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SPORTS
May 10, 1986
A lot of people seem to think that Ferdinand won the Kentucky Derby. But those who watched the race, especially the isolated replay, know better. Bill Shoemaker won the Kentucky Derby. Has there ever been a more brilliant ride in the annals of thoroughbred racing? LANNY R. MIDDINGS San Ramon
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
In 1970, Joseph Sax wrote a law review article that laid the foundation for a court case that would become famous in the annals of California water. More than a decade after publication of Sax's seminal essay on the public trust doctrine, the California Supreme Court ruled that the state had a duty to take into account the public trust in allocating water resources - an opinion that ultimately forced Los Angeles to reduce diversions from the Mono Lake basin in the Eastern Sierra.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1996
How dare Lewis Segal compare Irish step dancing to a "fascist march"! The Jewish people were not the only people persecuted in the annals of history. Study some Irish history, Mr. Segal, and apologize to the Irish for your insulting remark. BERNARD M. CONNORS Valencia
SPORTS
May 28, 2010 | Mark Heisler
It's a hard world to get a break in, although for some more than others. If you're the Lakers, you can miss two shots in the final seconds of Game 4 in the 2002 Western Conference finals, with the Sacramento Kings about to go up 3-1, and see the rebound batted out to the only player who isn't going for it, who hits the winning three-pointer. Only you, Robert Horry. Or you can be down one with :00.4 left in San Antonio in 2004 after Tim Duncan's floating 20-footer, see your designed options taken away and inbound it to the only player who's open, who throws up an 18-foot half hook, which goes in. Thanks, Derek Fisher.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1989 | Claudia Puig, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bob Hope has signed a new contract with NBC for an unprecedented 40th year of programming for the network, effective with the 1989-90 television season this fall. Hope's finale for the current season--a special celebrating his 86th birthday and the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution--is due to air Wednesday night. The comedian's lengthy association with the network is the most enduring in broadcast annals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1988
The Whizzer ran with the ball again. Unfortunately, he ran in the wrong direction, and he wasn't carrying a football this time. 'Tis a sad thing that the annals of sports trivia won't carry the entry that the Whizzer carried a football in the wrong direction with the result of a safety rather than the biographical entry that Justice Byron (Whizzer) White successfully led an attack on the First Amendment to the Bill of Rights of the Constitution of the United States. GEORGE H. MAASKE Santa Ana
HEALTH
September 18, 2006 | Hilary E. MacGregor Times Staff Writer, Times Staff Writer
Many women immediately quit smoking when they find out they are pregnant, knowing the habit is unhealthy for their unborn child. But sometimes that concern takes them only so far. A new study has found that women who were unmotivated to remain smoke-free after the birth of a child were more concerned about their weight than those who intended to kick the habit for good.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1999 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
The annals of child kidnapping are replete with heartbreaking tragedies, but probably none have been quite as bizarre as the crime that first mesmerized, then convulsed, Los Angeles more than 70 years ago. By the time it was over, it would involve not only an apparent abduction, but also impersonation, police coercion, false imprisonment, psychiatric abuse and--this being Los Angeles--a court fight that stretched on for more than a decade.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1987 | Academy Awards news, views and statistics from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The first Oscars ceremony was held on May 19, 1929, in the Blossom Room of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel--now completely refurbished and serving as headquarters for this year's Hollywood Centennial celebration as well as Sunday night's anti-Oscars, the Golden Raspberry Awards. "Howard the Duck" and "Under the Cherry Moon" tied for the uncoveted worst-picture Razzie award.
SCIENCE
September 5, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
President Kennedy's Addison's disease, which came to light only after his election in 1960, was most likely caused by a rare autoimmune disease, according to a Navy doctor who reviewed Kennedy's medical records. The disease, autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 2, or APS 2, also caused Kennedy's hypothyroidism, according to a report published Tuesday in the Annals of Internal Medicine. Hard though it is to believe these days -- when a celebrity's smallest sneeze is analyzed -- Kennedy's family and advisors were able to keep his medical history virtually secret.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2010 | By Martin Rubin
Even with the whole of the 20th century and a decade of the 21st separating us from the Victorians, that era continues to fascinate, as the success of director Guy Ritchie's recent Sherlock Holmes movie shows. No wonder, for few other periods offer such a wealth of contrasts. On the surface, there was all that respectability and propriety embodied in the starchy image of the queen, a time when it was actually thought proper to cover the legs of pianos as well as women lest they appear too suggestive.
SPORTS
December 3, 2009 | By Steve Harvey
Good news for St. Louis, Tampa Bay and Detroit fans -- spring training baseball begins in three months. (I don't know what to tell Cleveland fans.) For St. Louis football fans, if any are left, it was another historic weekend: As the St. Louis Post Dispatch pointed out, the Rams became the first St. Louis NFL team to lose 10 of its first 11 games -- a period covering 43 seasons of NFL football in that city, much of it pretty bad football. To show you how inept the Rams are, Seattle quarterback Matt Hasselbeck was a disaster for fantasy footballers competing 14 of 25 passes for just 101 yards and no touchdowns.
SPORTS
June 12, 2007 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
Maybe it's because of the Church Pews. Those rows of bunkers between the third and fourth holes are probably one reason Oakmont Country Club is spoken about in such reverential terms. Or maybe it's all about Oakmont's long and colorful history of playing host to major championships, 10 in all -- seven U.S. Opens and three PGA Championships -- dating back 85 years. It could be all the great champions, a Hall of Fame list if there ever was one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2007 | Steve Harvey
The new book "Hit the Streets!" is an entertaining compilation of true-life police tales by Steven Rose, a retired L.A. cop. Rose takes the reader along on several unusual adventures, such as a late-night search of a deserted building near LAX where a would-be burglar was believed to be hiding. "Just about the time we were about to give up and call off the search," Rose wrote, "I spotted some blond strands of hair sticking out from under a large pile of carpets in a dark corner."
SPORTS
January 29, 2007 | J.A. Adande
Ah, order is restored to the sports world. For a moment there it looked as if the laws of physics were unraveling when Tom Brady's pass was picked off in crunch time of the AFC championship game last week. Then Roger Federer won a Grand Slam tennis event, and the PGA golf tournament here at Torrey Pines ended up with Tiger Woods as the champion. In a related story, the sun rose in the east and set in the west. That's seven consecutive times Woods has played in a PGA Tour event and won.
HEALTH
September 18, 2006 | Hilary E. MacGregor Times Staff Writer, Times Staff Writer
Many women immediately quit smoking when they find out they are pregnant, knowing the habit is unhealthy for their unborn child. But sometimes that concern takes them only so far. A new study has found that women who were unmotivated to remain smoke-free after the birth of a child were more concerned about their weight than those who intended to kick the habit for good.
MAGAZINE
January 4, 1987
Jan. 25--Super Bowl XXI's half-time show salutes the Hollywood Centennial. Feb. 1--A star honoring Natalie Wood will be placed in the Walk of Fame in front of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel. A reception in the hotel follows, during which a centennial time capsule--filled with 100 items unique to Hollywood--will be unveiled. March--The California Lottery will issue game tickets with a Hollywood theme. May--An old-fashioned world premiere will be held in Hollywood.
MAGAZINE
January 4, 1987
1904--A city ordinance prohibits liquor sales except by prescription. 19l0--Movie houses banned. 1917--A woman appears nude in a leading role in a mainstream film. 1922--The Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America is founded, with former U.S. Postmaster General Will Hays serving as president.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2004 | Julie Cart, Times Staff Writer
Wildlife officials are combing the snow-covered high plains here for clues to explain the mysterious deaths of 280 elk, more than 60% of a herd that inhabits the southern edge of Wyoming's Red Desert. State Game and Fish officials say they cannot recall an elk die-off of this magnitude unrelated to harsh winter weather. The stricken elk, wintering in a broad swale, were found beginning a few weeks ago, dying of dehydration or starvation. "There are a lot of strange things about this," said Dr.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2003 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
In the annals of rock history, there's a squirrelly footnote known as the Shaggs, a small-town girl band that -- despite being named for their trendy hairdos -- could better be described as the anti-Farrahs. The Shaggs were really the Wiggins -- Dot, Betty and Helen -- three shy, hefty daughters of Austin Wiggin, a domineering man who truly believed his destiny lay in siring Fremont, N.H.'s female answer to Herman's Hermits.
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