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Anne Lamott

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April 4, 2010 | By Samantha Dunn
Imperfect Birds A Novel Anne Lamott Riverhead Books: 274 pp., $25.95 From the very first line of the very first page, Anne Lamott defines what's at stake in her new novel, "Imperfect Birds": "There are so many evils that pull on our children. Even in the mellow town of Landsdale, where it is easy to see only beauty and decency, a teenager died nearly every year after a party and kids routinely went from high school to psych wards, halfway house, or jail. Once a year a child from the county of Marin jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Without Anne Lamott, the entire sub-category of contemporary parent writing - which includes Brett Paesel, Christie Mellor, Ayun Halliday - as well as all those mommy bloggers - probably wouldn't exist. Her 1993 bestseller "Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son's First Year" set the standard, acknowledging the doubts and the difficulties, the sense that many first-time parents have of being cast into an alternate universe where simply taking a shower and getting dressed in clean clothes is a moral victory over the chaos and entropy that every infant leaves in his or her wake.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Without Anne Lamott, the entire sub-category of contemporary parent writing - which includes Brett Paesel, Christie Mellor, Ayun Halliday - as well as all those mommy bloggers - probably wouldn't exist. Her 1993 bestseller "Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son's First Year" set the standard, acknowledging the doubts and the difficulties, the sense that many first-time parents have of being cast into an alternate universe where simply taking a shower and getting dressed in clean clothes is a moral victory over the chaos and entropy that every infant leaves in his or her wake.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2010
BOOKS Tony Curtis: One of the last great lotharios of Hollywood, the "Some Like It Hot" star will discuss his career and show film clips from classics such as "Spartacus." He'll also be interviewed by "Experience Talks" host Tim Carpenter and sign copies of his new books, "American Prince" and "The Making of Some Like It Hot." The dish is that the on-screen chemistry between Marilyn Monroe and Curtis had its roots behind the scenes. Woodbury University, Fletcher Jones Auditorium, 7500 Glenoaks Blvd.
BOOKS
March 18, 2007 | Charlotte Innes, Charlotte Innes is a poet whose work was recently anthologized in "The Best American Spiritual Writing 2006." She writes about books for several publications and teaches English and journalism at Brentwood School.
THERE'S no one quite like Anne Lamott. She's an irreverent, civil liberties-minded late convert to Christianity who found Jesus after years of drinking and drug-taking in the bohemian outback of Marin County. A vocal opponent of Republican politics, she's also a single mother whose son, Sam, now a teenager, has been a presence in her writing since his birth (more recently with his permission, she notes). Clearly, Lamott is not your typical Christian writer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2003 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
This is a paperback reissue of an Anne Lamott novel first published in 1985 by North Point Press. For fans who missed it the first time around, "Joe Jones" is a time capsule that shows the author developing the style and themes that have won her fame for "Traveling Mercies," "Operating Instructions" and "Hard Laughter." And for readers unfamiliar with Lamott's unique blend of bohemianism and spirituality, it isn't the worst of introductions. "Joe Jones" opens somewhat misleadingly.
NEWS
September 16, 2002 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The white VW bug in the garage and the sign at the entrance--Hippies Use Side Door--signal that this is where Anne Lamott lives. It's a light-filled house on a knoll in this Marin County town of 7,500 with its bohemian '60s sensibility. "You probably saw more tie-dye today than you've seen in years, right?" says Lamott, opening the door. She's wearing jeans and a casual shirt and her signature dreadlocks are slightly askew, one "sticking up like a little antenna."
BOOKS
May 9, 1993 | Erika Taylor, Erika Taylor is the author of "The Sun Maiden" (Atheneum) and, with her husband Kevin, has a 2-month-old son, Aaron
There are two types of readers. (And, as the old saying goes, two types of people: those who separate others into categories and those who don't.) The first reader-type doesn't like surprise or discomfort. They enjoy good solid writing, which reaffirms all their beliefs about the world. The second reader-type is just the opposite, hoping for an author who will confuse, challenge, and ultimately change them even if it's just a little bit.
NEWS
January 18, 1995 | CARROLL LACHNIT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On an Advent morning, writer Anne Lamott sat in the kitchen of her San Rafael home, scowling at her black Lab retriever, Sadie. The dog had helped herself to the dozen cupcakes Lamott and her 5-year-old son, Sam, had baked for his kindergarten Christmas party. Sadie dolefully circled Lamott, eyes up, hoping for forgiveness. Wasn't it the season of grace and love? Lamott relented and gave Sadie a pat.
NEWS
January 26, 1999 | REGINA MARLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If you're stuck in an elevator when the Big One hits, you couldn't do much better than be stranded there with Anne Lamott. In a pinch, even her latest book, a collection of funny, warm and sagacious personal essays that first appeared in the online magazine Salon, could get you through the dark hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2010 | By Samantha Dunn
Imperfect Birds A Novel Anne Lamott Riverhead Books: 274 pp., $25.95 From the very first line of the very first page, Anne Lamott defines what's at stake in her new novel, "Imperfect Birds": "There are so many evils that pull on our children. Even in the mellow town of Landsdale, where it is easy to see only beauty and decency, a teenager died nearly every year after a party and kids routinely went from high school to psych wards, halfway house, or jail. Once a year a child from the county of Marin jumped off the Golden Gate Bridge."
OPINION
February 19, 2010
India and its charms Re "Wisdom, a world away," Opinion, Feb. 14 What a beautifully conceived and executed response to the "tea baggers," however unintended it may have been. Anne Lamott's antidote to the mentally challenged weepers who cannot deal with adversity of any degree without threatening revolution is the grace with which the impoverished of India rise above their difficulties and play with the hand that is dealt them. Sure these are hard times for all of us, but why not try compassion, forgiveness and understanding instead of acrimony and bilious attacks?
BOOKS
March 18, 2007 | Charlotte Innes, Charlotte Innes is a poet whose work was recently anthologized in "The Best American Spiritual Writing 2006." She writes about books for several publications and teaches English and journalism at Brentwood School.
THERE'S no one quite like Anne Lamott. She's an irreverent, civil liberties-minded late convert to Christianity who found Jesus after years of drinking and drug-taking in the bohemian outback of Marin County. A vocal opponent of Republican politics, she's also a single mother whose son, Sam, now a teenager, has been a presence in her writing since his birth (more recently with his permission, she notes). Clearly, Lamott is not your typical Christian writer.
MAGAZINE
May 28, 2006
Having lived in (marvelous) Marin, I can visualize the places and scenery that Anne Lamott described in her essay ("Blessed Are the Annoying," May 7). And being the mother of a teenage boy, I could smell Sam's bedroom and experience the frustration of chores not done and promises going by the wayside because of sleeping or other teen-important activities. I appreciated Lamott's words of wisdom in "the four things I know for sure about raising kids," which told me that I have been affecting my son's character by overlooking all the things that are important to me, letting him go play beach volleyball instead of staying home to help me when I was sick.
MAGAZINE
February 26, 2006
Anne Lamott's "dance" with words is truly in a "class" by itself ("Dance Class," Feb. 5). Waltzing through one delightful sentence after another, never quite letting on which way a phrase will turn or when she will unselfconsciously step on her own prose, Lamott's writing is as exhilarating as it is engaging. Thank you for sharing her latest work. Anne Lamott is truly a national treasure. Alitta Kullman Laguna Hills Lamott makes me laugh uproariously, sob uncontrollably and always reminds me of the lessons this messy thing called life has to teach us when we pay attention.
OPINION
February 13, 2006
Re "The rights of the born," Opinion, Feb. 10 Abortion must remain legal, safe and available to all women. But with people like Anne Lamott calling fetuses "teeny weenie so-called babies" and comparing them to sea monkeys, our side cannot possibly prevail. There seems to be no room in this discussion for a woman like me, who holds two passionate beliefs: that abortion must always be legal, and that I could never have one myself. Although these are two separate issues, as they should be -- the government has no business teaching me morals -- Lamott's tirade makes abortion-rights proponents look like spoiled, selfish women who consider having an abortion something that everyone does and who get through tough times by pigging out on M&Ms.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"People need us," says Anne Lamott of writers, "to mirror for them and for each other without distortion--not to look around and say, 'Look at yourselves, you idiots!' but to say, 'This is who we are.' " And this is part of her larger belief that "good writing is about telling the truth." "Truth," she writes, "seems to want expression." So, a good writer needs to get at the truth. This is not easy because it is so often buried, obscured or dangerous.
MAGAZINE
February 26, 2006
Anne Lamott's "dance" with words is truly in a "class" by itself ("Dance Class," Feb. 5). Waltzing through one delightful sentence after another, never quite letting on which way a phrase will turn or when she will unselfconsciously step on her own prose, Lamott's writing is as exhilarating as it is engaging. Thank you for sharing her latest work. Anne Lamott is truly a national treasure. Alitta Kullman Laguna Hills Lamott makes me laugh uproariously, sob uncontrollably and always reminds me of the lessons this messy thing called life has to teach us when we pay attention.
BOOKS
March 27, 2005 | Bernadette Murphy, Bernadette Murphy is a regular contributor to the Book Review and the author of "Zen and the Art of Knitting," a work of narrative nonfiction.
People of faith (Christian and otherwise) disappointed with the results of the last presidential election have reason to raise their hearts and voices in thanks and praise -- for the writings of Anne Lamott. A left-wing Christian who's a recovering alcoholic with a checkered past and a wicked sense of humor, Lamott writes essays (many of which first appeared on Salon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2005 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
Outside it's raining like crazy. Inside Anne Lamott is fighting a cold. Her dog drags something from the cat box into the living room. Her large cat clambers across the futon chair in which Lamott is sitting and the wood armrest clatters to the floor. It could be grist for a typical quirky Lamott essay: the vicissitudes of daily life, first trying, then revealing some glimmer of meaning, a bit of unexpected grace like sudden sunshine on a stormy day.
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