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Anne Roiphe

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September 6, 1987 | Linsey Abrams, Abrams' most recent novel is "Double Vision."
In both her fiction and nonfiction over the last two decades, Anne Roiphe has addressed topical social issues: women's liberation, homosexuality on campus, child psychology; the list goes on. In her new novel, "Lovingkindness," she has chosen as her subject matter two topics of public discourse in the '80s, which, in their intersection, raise several important questions about the lives of contemporary women.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2006 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
"THE year was 1883. Cholera had come to Alexandria" -- so ends the first chapter and sets the stage of "An Imperfect Lens," a striking novel examining the intersection of faith and science amid a massive cholera epidemic in Egypt. The story's main characters, scientists working under the direction of Louis Pasteur, struggle against time and limited knowledge to identify the microorganism making vast numbers of the population deathly ill.
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BOOKS
November 27, 1988 | Elaine Kendall, Kendall reviews frequently for View.
Brave, tactful and deeply thoughtful, Anne Roiphe's extended essay on the Holocaust nevertheless seems destined to arouse strong passions, if only because most of her readers will inevitably be those acutely sensitized to the subject. In her modest opening disclaimer, Roiphe states that she is neither a survivor nor the child of a survivor; not a historian, a political scientist or a theologian--but only a journalist profoundly concerned with humanity's future.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | PAULA SPAN, WASHINGTON POST
More often than she would like, as she sprints around the country promoting her new book, Anne Roiphe hears that phrase. A woman comes up to her, at a bookstore or a reading, and begins, "I'm not a feminist, but . . . ." And Roiphe smiles a tired smile. Invariably, the person she sees is "a strong woman who's economically independent, a decent sense of herself, nobody's handmaiden--by my standards she's a feminist," she says.
BOOKS
August 11, 1991 | Frances Stead Sellers, Sellers, former manuscript editor of Daedalus, the Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, is a free-lance writer and critic
In 1978, the New York Times published a story entitled "Christmas Comes to a Jewish Home," describing the "sacred event" of Christmas in a nominally Jewish household, complete with trimmed tree and readings from Dylan Thomas. Shocked readers denounced the article's "tooth-fairy theology." Anne Roiphe, its author, was taken aback.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992
I would like to give accolades to Anne Roiphe for defining the Shamir and Sharon government precisely for what it is--an orchestrated impediment to peace in the Middle East. The game that they're playing, in the world arena, of not playing by the rules (of the U.N. and Geneva Convention), and then thumbing their noses at the judges and world spectators, does immeasurable harm to the state of Israel, and the many peace-loving Jewish people, such as Roiphe. I know some extremist will readily call these views anti-Semitic.
BOOKS
December 24, 1995 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
WOMEN ON DIVORCE: A Bedside Companion edited by Penny Kaganoff and Susan Spano. (Harcourt Brace: $22; 195 pp.) In case you haven't heard, according to the editors of this compelling anthology, the numbers are as follows: "nearly a third of all women who marry between the ages of 20 and 44 get divorced. What is more, half of all second marriages end in divorce."
BOOKS
December 11, 1988
Elaine Kendall's congratulatory review of Anne Roiphe's study of the Holocaust, "A Season for Healing" (Book Review, Nov. 27), is a distressing inversion and distortion of the significance of that unique tragedy. Rather than commend Roiphe for slipping the planned murder of 6 million Jews into the larger context of 100 million murdered in this century, Kendall should re-examine the notion that sees only a quantitative difference between the Holocaust and other manifestations of brutality.
NEWS
December 26, 1985 | ROSELLE M. LEWIS
Your Child's Mind: The Complete Guide to Infant and Child Emotional Well-Being by Herman Roiphe MD and Anne Roiphe (St. Martin's/Marek: $19.95); First Feelings: Milestones in the Emotional Development of Your Baby and Child by Stanley Greenspan MD and Nancy Thorndike Greenspan (Viking: $17.95).
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You'd think that with all the sparkling, supportive dialogue about work and mothering, including Louise Erdrich's "The Blue Jay's Dance," Anne Lamott's "Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son's First Year" and now Anne Roiphe's "Fruitful" (to name one one-thousandth of the really fine gross national product) that we could have a law encouraging corporations with more than 15 employees to have on-site day care.
NEWS
September 20, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You'd think that with all the sparkling, supportive dialogue about work and mothering, including Louise Erdrich's "The Blue Jay's Dance," Anne Lamott's "Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son's First Year" and now Anne Roiphe's "Fruitful" (to name one one-thousandth of the really fine gross national product) that we could have a law encouraging corporations with more than 15 employees to have on-site day care.
BOOKS
December 24, 1995 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
WOMEN ON DIVORCE: A Bedside Companion edited by Penny Kaganoff and Susan Spano. (Harcourt Brace: $22; 195 pp.) In case you haven't heard, according to the editors of this compelling anthology, the numbers are as follows: "nearly a third of all women who marry between the ages of 20 and 44 get divorced. What is more, half of all second marriages end in divorce."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992
I would like to give accolades to Anne Roiphe for defining the Shamir and Sharon government precisely for what it is--an orchestrated impediment to peace in the Middle East. The game that they're playing, in the world arena, of not playing by the rules (of the U.N. and Geneva Convention), and then thumbing their noses at the judges and world spectators, does immeasurable harm to the state of Israel, and the many peace-loving Jewish people, such as Roiphe. I know some extremist will readily call these views anti-Semitic.
OPINION
January 12, 1992 | ANNE ROIPHE, Anne Roiphe, a board member of Americans for Peace Now, is a novelist and a journalist based in New York.
New Year's Eve we watched the fireworks shoot up into the sky over Central Park. At least the bang was not caused by guns or Scuds, at least the room I was in was unsealed, my enemies oceans away. The next few days we drowsily contemplated the past and future and cleaned a closet or two.
BOOKS
August 11, 1991 | Frances Stead Sellers, Sellers, former manuscript editor of Daedalus, the Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, is a free-lance writer and critic
In 1978, the New York Times published a story entitled "Christmas Comes to a Jewish Home," describing the "sacred event" of Christmas in a nominally Jewish household, complete with trimmed tree and readings from Dylan Thomas. Shocked readers denounced the article's "tooth-fairy theology." Anne Roiphe, its author, was taken aback.
BOOKS
December 11, 1988
Elaine Kendall's congratulatory review of Anne Roiphe's study of the Holocaust, "A Season for Healing" (Book Review, Nov. 27), is a distressing inversion and distortion of the significance of that unique tragedy. Rather than commend Roiphe for slipping the planned murder of 6 million Jews into the larger context of 100 million murdered in this century, Kendall should re-examine the notion that sees only a quantitative difference between the Holocaust and other manifestations of brutality.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2006 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
"THE year was 1883. Cholera had come to Alexandria" -- so ends the first chapter and sets the stage of "An Imperfect Lens," a striking novel examining the intersection of faith and science amid a massive cholera epidemic in Egypt. The story's main characters, scientists working under the direction of Louis Pasteur, struggle against time and limited knowledge to identify the microorganism making vast numbers of the population deathly ill.
BOOKS
November 27, 1988 | Elaine Kendall, Kendall reviews frequently for View.
Brave, tactful and deeply thoughtful, Anne Roiphe's extended essay on the Holocaust nevertheless seems destined to arouse strong passions, if only because most of her readers will inevitably be those acutely sensitized to the subject. In her modest opening disclaimer, Roiphe states that she is neither a survivor nor the child of a survivor; not a historian, a political scientist or a theologian--but only a journalist profoundly concerned with humanity's future.
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