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Anniversaries

ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Much is being made about "Lost in Space" sinking "Titanic" this weekend, but in many ways, the more interesting tale involves "Grease," a 20-year-old picture currently in its second week of re-release, at No. 4 on the box-office charts. In its 10 days of re-release, in fact, "Grease," the '50s-themed musical starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, has grossed a stunning $20.2 million; its opening weekend take of $12.
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NEWS
April 16, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A single protester, realizing that he faced almost certain arrest, sought to honor the victims of last June's Beijing massacre by displaying white paper flowers in Tian An Men Square on Sunday. The man, who identified himself as a scientist from southern Guizhou province, briefly drew a small crowd of Chinese pedestrians and foreign correspondents, then was detained and taken away by police.
NEWS
June 23, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Like death and taxes, June gloom is a certainty of life -- at least in Southern California. And although the marine layer has been doing its usual thing, Los Angeles-based dancer-choreographer Loretta Livingston hopes Friday night will be clear. That's because her new site-specific piece, "June Moon (Dressed in White)," will be performed outside the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in downtown L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a big day for anniversaries at Los Angeles police headquarters Tuesday. And the biggest honor belonged to robbery Det. Jack Giroud, who joined the LAPD 44 years ago, when Norris Poulsen was mayor and the city was a little more than half its current size. On hand to congratulate Giroud was wife Dixie, who marked her 24th anniversary with the Los Angeles Police Protective League, and Police Chief Bernard C. Parks, who said Feb. 1 was his 35th anniversary with the department.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is impossible to tell looking up from the street, but one of the twin Trillium office towers in Woodland Hills' Warner Center leans about five inches to one side. The Northridge earthquake shook the 17-story steel-frame building out of plumb, and several weeks of work last spring failed to straighten it. "It won't go back," said manager Robert Benton. Unnerved by the flaw, some tenants hired their own structural engineer and temporarily moved out.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nine-year-old Juan Carlos Osorio considers Christopher Columbus a hero for "discovering America" and displaying great courage. "If it was true the world was square, he would have died. He would have fallen off the ocean and into the sky," the fourth-grader said. On the other hand, he also knows that the famous explorer took American Indians as slaves and that they contracted devastating diseases from the crews of Columbus' ships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first U.S. military men to land on the Japanese mainland at the end of World War II were 5,000 lightly armed paratroopers of the 11th Airborne Division, wracked with worries about a possible ambush by die-hard Japanese soldiers and civilians. "Everybody was scared to death," said Len Wallach of West Hills, then an 18-year-old buck private and now a retired Army colonel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1999 | HARRISON SHEPPARD and DAVID HALDANE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Life was just returning to normal in Little Saigon, and now a series of new conflicts is looming that threatens to further divide the Vietnamese community and put it at odds with other residents of Westminster as well. While some say the friction creates the opportunity for a new dialogue and understanding between Vietnamese and the larger community, others fear a confrontation Friday, when thousands are expected to flood the city for events commemorating the fall of Saigon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1997 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"From Slowtime to Showtime." That's not the motto of television's Showtime network, but executives at the pay-cable channel can recall a few years when prominent agents and producers would joke about Showtime's pace when it came to putting original movies and programming on the fast track.
NEWS
February 15, 2001 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He's a cheeky little fellow with goofy eyes and a decidedly saucy way of summing up the world. He sticks his nose into everything. He's fond of very bad puns. And folks here are just gaga over him. The Weatherbird, a cartoon figure with a penchant for sass, celebrated his 100th birthday this week, making him the longest-running daily cartoon in American journalism. He's anchored the front page of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch since Feb. 11, 1901.
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