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Anniversaries

NEWS
April 20, 1997 | From Associated Press
The glimmer of a maroon and gray headstone stood out among the memorials for the 70 Branch Davidians on the sun-splashed prairie where they died four years ago Saturday after a standoff with the government. "In remembrance of all the men, women and children who were victimized and brutally slaughtered in the bombing of the Oklahoma City Federal Building," reads the marker, dated April 19, 1997.
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NEWS
March 14, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It may sound like merely a matter of history and ceremony, but it is providing President Clinton with one of the touchiest foreign-policy decisions of the year--whether to travel to Moscow in May and stand beside Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin to commemorate World War II's end in Europe. Yeltsin's invitation to Clinton for May 9 ceremonies marking the Allied victory over Nazi Germany has forced the President and his top advisers to make agonizing choices. If Clinton does not go, some U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1998 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Much is being made about "Lost in Space" sinking "Titanic" this weekend, but in many ways, the more interesting tale involves "Grease," a 20-year-old picture currently in its second week of re-release, at No. 4 on the box-office charts. In its 10 days of re-release, in fact, "Grease," the '50s-themed musical starring John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John, has grossed a stunning $20.2 million; its opening weekend take of $12.
NEWS
April 16, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A single protester, realizing that he faced almost certain arrest, sought to honor the victims of last June's Beijing massacre by displaying white paper flowers in Tian An Men Square on Sunday. The man, who identified himself as a scientist from southern Guizhou province, briefly drew a small crowd of Chinese pedestrians and foreign correspondents, then was detained and taken away by police.
NEWS
June 23, 2005 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
Like death and taxes, June gloom is a certainty of life -- at least in Southern California. And although the marine layer has been doing its usual thing, Los Angeles-based dancer-choreographer Loretta Livingston hopes Friday night will be clear. That's because her new site-specific piece, "June Moon (Dressed in White)," will be performed outside the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center in downtown L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2000 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a big day for anniversaries at Los Angeles police headquarters Tuesday. And the biggest honor belonged to robbery Det. Jack Giroud, who joined the LAPD 44 years ago, when Norris Poulsen was mayor and the city was a little more than half its current size. On hand to congratulate Giroud was wife Dixie, who marked her 24th anniversary with the Los Angeles Police Protective League, and Police Chief Bernard C. Parks, who said Feb. 1 was his 35th anniversary with the department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2002 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks will be marked by an array of events across the Southland in what some experts say is a natural next chapter in dealing with an unprecedented collective trauma. Besides nonstop television remembrances, the doors of mosques, temples and cathedrals will be open for interfaith services through Wednesday, the anniversary date. Surfers will paddle from San Onofre State Beach to scatter World Trade Center debris in the Pacific.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is impossible to tell looking up from the street, but one of the twin Trillium office towers in Woodland Hills' Warner Center leans about five inches to one side. The Northridge earthquake shook the 17-story steel-frame building out of plumb, and several weeks of work last spring failed to straighten it. "It won't go back," said manager Robert Benton. Unnerved by the flaw, some tenants hired their own structural engineer and temporarily moved out.
NEWS
December 26, 1991 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Nine-year-old Juan Carlos Osorio considers Christopher Columbus a hero for "discovering America" and displaying great courage. "If it was true the world was square, he would have died. He would have fallen off the ocean and into the sky," the fourth-grader said. On the other hand, he also knows that the famous explorer took American Indians as slaves and that they contracted devastating diseases from the crews of Columbus' ships.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1995 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first U.S. military men to land on the Japanese mainland at the end of World War II were 5,000 lightly armed paratroopers of the 11th Airborne Division, wracked with worries about a possible ambush by die-hard Japanese soldiers and civilians. "Everybody was scared to death," said Len Wallach of West Hills, then an 18-year-old buck private and now a retired Army colonel.
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