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Anorexia Nervosa

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NEWS
August 21, 1994 | STEVE WILSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Strong, lithe and vivacious, Christy Henrich spent years spinning, leaping and vaulting across balance beams, around parallel bars and over padded mats, a muscular sprite nicknamed "E.T." for Extra Tough. That seems impossibly long ago. On July 26, withered to little more than a fragile skeleton, her papery skin a ghostly gray-white, her gums and kidneys bleeding, her throat ulcerated, her heart barely pumping, Henrich died of multiple organ failure. She was 22 and weighed less than 60 pounds.
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NEWS
March 21, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots Blog
This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details. The Israeli Parliament's move to ban skinny models from appearing in that nation's media may be less momentous than its efforts to thwart Iran's bid to build nuclear weapons. But to the Israeli politicians who sponsored the measure, which won approval in Tel Aviv on Monday, and to American experts on eating disorders, the measure is a clear step toward a key goal: promoting more realistic body images among girls and women.
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HEALTH
April 7, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Anorexia nervosa is a difficult disease to understand, causing people to starve themselves or see themselves as fat when they're actually underweight. Many theories on the cause of anorexia have been floated, from parenting practices to cultural forces that pressure girls to be thin. But researchers now believe that the baffling, dangerous disorder has its roots in biology, that genes make some people vulnerable.
NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Autism spectrum disorders can be caused by as many as 300 or so rare genetic mutations, scientists reported Wednesday. The research strongly implicates genetics, including spontaneous gene mutations, in the development of the disorder. But why do four times as many males as females develop autism spectrum disorder? In one of the three papers published in the journal Neuron , researchers suggest that girls are more resistant to gene mutations than boys. Girls seem to require a higher number of gene mutations to become afflicted with autism spectrum disorder.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like many wrestling coaches, Terry Davis often placed tremendous emphasis on weight. How much does that boy weigh? Can he lose five pounds by Friday? Didn't I tell that kid not to go an ounce over 130? Davis, a longtime youth coach now in his first year at Whittier Christian High in La Habra, used to consider weight to be nearly as important as performance. But his outlook has changed.
BOOKS
December 24, 1989 | Nancy Mairs, Mairs' latest book, "Remembering the Bone House" (Harper & Row), is a memoir of her life as a female body. and
During the two most severe depressive episodes I've experienced, when I lost weight in the rapid and involuntary manner characteristic of this kind of emotional disorder, I found myself the object, for a surprising number of women, less of sympathy than of envy: "Oh," they'd sigh, "aren't you lucky to be so thin."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2009 | By Dana Parsons
Bryan Bixler is dying. He feels it in his bones a little more each day, as if passing the mirror in his Laguna Beach apartment and glancing at himself isn't evidence enough. Here's what greets him: sunken eyes, paper-thin arms and legs that hang like a puppet's, the slow-motion gait that he fears will define his movements for the rest of his days. What happened, he wonders, to that young man who once ran half-marathons? It's all so crazy. That's what he tells himself. Dying a bit more every day and knowing how to fix it but being unable to do it. Knowing that if he would just start eating like a normal person, he'd give himself a fighting chance.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | LESLIE KNOWLTON
While both anorexia nervosa and bulimia involve distorted obsessions with food, anorexics become emaciated and bulimics usually maintain a normal weight. * Both are considered serious psychiatric illnesses, with bulimia more common and anorexia more intractable. * People with eating disorders may also have other psychiatric problems, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder or mood disorders. * 86% of sufferers report onset of illness by age 20.
OPINION
April 7, 2009
Re "Starving for medical help," April 3 Medi-Cal patients aren't the only ones who have difficulty getting appropriate treatment for anorexia nervosa. Privately insured patients are also denied coverage for specialized care on a regular basis. Genes are responsible for much of the disorder, and 75% of patients who begin treatment in adolescence improve or recover fully. Yet, as poignantly described in The Times, family members often blame patients, and patients blame themselves. Without treatment, anorexia nervosa kills more people than any other psychiatric disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1989 | Compiled from staff and wire reports
An addiction to opiates produced by the brain while dieting may be the cause of anorexia nervosa, an eating disorder in which patients starve themselves, sometimes to death, Michigan researchers said last week. The scientists say their research, presented at the 40th annual meeting of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, suggested anorexics may have "abnormal biological responses" to diet-triggered opiates.
NEWS
December 29, 2010 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Isabelle Caro's emaciated frame on Italian billboards a few years ago carried a shocking anti-anorexia message -- which was exactly what the French model had intended. Her highly publicized battle against the eating disorder, however, didn't manage to save her own life. Caro died Nov. 17 at the age of 28, media reports say. One story quotes her longtime acting instructor Daniele Dubreuil-Prevot as saying "she did not know the cause of death but that Caro 'had been sick for a long time,' referring to her anorexia.
NEWS
October 4, 2010
It's no secret there's a disparity between the average U.S. woman who weighs 140 pounds and stands 5 feet 4 inches tall and the average American model who weighs 117 pounds and 5 feet 11 inches tall. The compairison comes from the National Eating Disorders Assn. , which counts body image as a factor that may contribute to anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders. Who suffers most from anorexia? Forty percent of new cases are girls between 15 and 19 years old. Find out the symptoms of anorexia and the toll the disease takes on the human body at WomensHealth.
OPINION
April 7, 2009
Re "Starving for medical help," April 3 Medi-Cal patients aren't the only ones who have difficulty getting appropriate treatment for anorexia nervosa. Privately insured patients are also denied coverage for specialized care on a regular basis. Genes are responsible for much of the disorder, and 75% of patients who begin treatment in adolescence improve or recover fully. Yet, as poignantly described in The Times, family members often blame patients, and patients blame themselves. Without treatment, anorexia nervosa kills more people than any other psychiatric disorder.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2009 | By Dana Parsons
Bryan Bixler is dying. He feels it in his bones a little more each day, as if passing the mirror in his Laguna Beach apartment and glancing at himself isn't evidence enough. Here's what greets him: sunken eyes, paper-thin arms and legs that hang like a puppet's, the slow-motion gait that he fears will define his movements for the rest of his days. What happened, he wonders, to that young man who once ran half-marathons? It's all so crazy. That's what he tells himself. Dying a bit more every day and knowing how to fix it but being unable to do it. Knowing that if he would just start eating like a normal person, he'd give himself a fighting chance.
HEALTH
October 1, 2007 | Janet Cromley, Times Staff Writer
A part of the brain that helps regulate taste may play a role in anorexia nervosa. Using functional MRIs, researchers at UC San Diego and the University of Pittsburgh measured activity in the brains of 32 women, while the women tasted sugar and distilled water. Half of the women had recovered from anorexia; the other half had never had the eating disorder.
HEALTH
March 13, 2006 | From Reuters
Genetics play a big role in anorexia nervosa, the exaggerated fear of weight gain that causes many young women to starve themselves, researchers have found. A study of twins in Sweden found that about 56% of the risk for developing the eating disorder is based on family history, the report from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill said. Other unspecified factors triggered the disorder in 44% of the cases, the study said.
NEWS
April 22, 1990
I was very touched by CBS' repeat of "The Karen Carpenter Story." I can relate to her problem, because at the age of 17, I too had anorexia nervosa. The doctors didn't know very much about the disease in the early '70s, but today I am being nursed back to health. I loved Karen, who had a lovely voice that I'll always remember. Kathy Clark, Laguna Niguel
NEWS
May 25, 1986
A recently discovered hormone may play a role in both depression and anorexia nervosa, and the two disorders may be more closely related than previously believed, researchers report. The discovery that high levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) accompany both disorders may help unravel their biochemical basis and possibly lead to better treatments, they said.
HEALTH
April 7, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Anorexia nervosa is a difficult disease to understand, causing people to starve themselves or see themselves as fat when they're actually underweight. Many theories on the cause of anorexia have been floated, from parenting practices to cultural forces that pressure girls to be thin. But researchers now believe that the baffling, dangerous disorder has its roots in biology, that genes make some people vulnerable.
SPORTS
March 15, 1997 | TRIS WYKES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stacey Jensen used to be a star soccer player. She is still an outstanding student. But compulsiveness and competitiveness, traits that helped shape her into a top performer on the field and in the classroom, eventually led to a condition that threatened her life. Jensen, 17, a La Reina High senior, is fighting to overcome anorexia nervosa with the same inner fire that she once used to run down soccer opponents. Only now her success is measured on a scale.
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