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Anschutz Exploration Corp

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NEWS
June 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton was pressed to reconsider allowing oil drilling in a Montana valley sacred to Native Americans. A permit to drill was issued last month to a company owned by a prominent Republican donor. Norton was questioned during a hearing about a permit issued to Anschutz Exploration Corp. Philip Anschutz donated thousands to the campaigns of President Bush, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and others.
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NEWS
June 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Interior Secretary Gale A. Norton was pressed to reconsider allowing oil drilling in a Montana valley sacred to Native Americans. A permit to drill was issued last month to a company owned by a prominent Republican donor. Norton was questioned during a hearing about a permit issued to Anschutz Exploration Corp. Philip Anschutz donated thousands to the campaigns of President Bush, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) and others.
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NEWS
May 22, 2001 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal land agency on Monday upheld billionaire Philip Anschutz's right to drill an exploratory oil well in an area of south-central Montana where Native American tribes want to preserve sacred rock drawings. The site, called Weatherman Draw, has become an early flash point for the Bush-Cheney energy plan, which aims to ease access for oil and natural gas exploration on public lands.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial plan to explore for oil in a Montana valley adorned with indigenous rock art has been put on hold after tribal leaders offered to swap reservation land for the drill site, known as Weatherman Draw. The dispute over Weatherman Draw brought together several Indian tribes, the Sierra Club and the National Trust for Historic Preservation and marked the first test, outside Alaska, of the Bush administration's policy to open up more public land to energy exploration.
NEWS
May 21, 2001 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The artists never signed their names, and for centuries their sandstone gallery remained hidden from all but their tribal descendants who wandered these windy sagebrush steppes. That obscurity is about to end, as one of the nation's richest oilmen, who also is a major contributor to the Republican Party, has been given permission to search for what he believes could be a pool of 10 million barrels of oil buried here.
NEWS
April 24, 2002 | GEOFFREY MOHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Denver-based energy company has given up plans to drill for oil in a Montana canyon decorated with ancient rock art that is sacred to several American Indian tribes and will donate its leases to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The decision by Anschutz Exploration Corp. announced Tuesday ends a yearlong wrangle over Weatherman Draw, an obscure 2-mile-long niche in southern Montana that became an early battleground over President Bush's energy policy in the Western states.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2001 | BECKY BOHRER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The wind can howl for days without taking a breath, blowing with a force known to tip over railroad cars. Leaders of the Blackfeet Indian reservation, where unemployment hovers near 70%, hope the wind has enough strength to carry off some of the poverty too. The Blackfeet, who live in the shadows of the Rocky Mountains in northwest Montana, are developing what is being called the first commercial wind farm on an American Indian reservation.
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