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December 11, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Over at Essay Daily (which calls itself “A Filter for and An Ongoing Conversation About Essays and Magazines About Writing”), John D'Agata offers a brief meditation on Ansel Adams - and the moment he understood that photographs were not taken so much as made. The year was 1927, and Adams “hadn't figured out yet how to make photography work, how to render with light and luck and dark the deep and powerful truths that he felt when in the mountains.” He was in Yosemite, shooting images of Half Dome, when, as an experiment, he decided to use “a heavy red filter that immediately darkens the sky, transforms it even darker than the cliff face itself, so that an abyss opens up on the left side of the cliff, as if the brooding shelf of Half Dome has torn straight through it like a cleaver made of light.” This, D'Agata suggests, is the turning point: when Adams stopped merely being someone who shot pictures and became an artist, with all the intentionality it implies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014 | By David Ng
The Getty Museum reported an uptick in attendance for March due in part to interest in its exhibition devoted to Jackson Pollock's "Mural. " March attendance at the Getty Center reached 127,466 visitors, an increase of 3% from the same month last year, museum officials said. Attendance in March 2013 was 123,734, a Getty spokeswoman said, also an unusually high number due to an early Easter and spring break and an exhibition of Vermeer's "Woman in Blue. " From 2010 to 2012, average March attendance at the Getty Center was about 97,000.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Breaking a silence it had maintained during a monthlong controversy, the leading archive housing Ansel Adams' photographs has disputed Rick Norsigian's claim that old-fashioned glass-plate negatives he bought at a garage sale in Fresno represent a "lost" chapter in the great nature photographer's career. "We have no reason to believe that these negatives are, in fact, the work of Ansel Adams," said the statement issued Tuesday by the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona in Tucson.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
The most striking thing about the 44 images reproduced in Sylvia Plath's “Drawings” (Harper: 64 pp., $25.99) may be how unpopulated they are. Produced during the two years the poet spent on a Fulbright fellowship at Cambridge - the same period in which she met and married (secretly, at first) Ted Hughes  - this material evokes a world bound almost entirely by objects: boats, shoes, rooftops, all of it detailed, shadowed, but at the same time more than a little bit removed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2010
The bankrupt Fresno Metropolitan Museum has agreed to return six Ansel Adams photographs to his son, who objected to the items being sold to pay creditors. Adams' attorney, Rene Lastreto, said the famed nature photographer never intended for private collectors to hang those prints in their living rooms. The move is intended to settle a lawsuit by Michael Adams and his wife, Jeanne, who gave the prints to the museum but maintained they did not give permission for their sale.
NEWS
December 24, 1988 | ROBERT LACHMAN, Times Staff Writer; Robert Lachman is chief photographer for The Times Orange County Edition.
In his younger days, John Sexton's world was that of engines and grease, speed and danger. While attending high school, Sexton usually spent his spare time working on the pit crew of a professional drag racer. The idea of making a living by recording that world through a photographic lens hadn't occurred to him. And few would have guessed that Sexton would one day evolve into one of the best-known art photographers in America.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The Hawaii works by painter Georgia O'Keeffe and photographer Ansel Adams will be featured in a special exhibition at the Honolulu Museum of Art beginning Friday. O'Keeffe is best known for her colorful portrayals of flowers and the Southwest, and Adams for his expansive California landscapes. But both found a wealth of subjects during their visits to Hawaii . O'Keeffe traveled to the islands in 1939 to create advertising illustrations for Hawaii Pineapple Co. (now Dole)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1988
Almost as an apology, Ansel Adams told viewers of his stunning photographs that he printed them in a manner that may have distorted reality. Adams did so to recall for himself the personal experience and emotion that he felt at the time he shot the pictures. He hoped that at least a few of those who saw his photos could experience some of the same emotion. The response to Adams' photos indicates that he was far too humble about the possible effect that they would have on the viewer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Works from the three leading players in this summer's big art-photography controversy will be hung in a Los Angeles gallery on Saturday for a brief exhibition aimed at giving folks a chance to see what the hubbub is all about, and decide for themselves. One is Ansel Adams, America's greatest nature photographer, who'll be represented by about 20 prints — hand-developed and signed by Adams himself and guaranteed to be authentic by the Duncan Miller Gallery in West Los Angeles, which is putting on the show.
NEWS
February 7, 2000 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yosemite was a constant touchstone in the life of Virginia Best Adams, the sometimes collaborator, sometimes publisher and overall steadying influence in the life of her husband, the late photographer Ansel Adams. But her roots to Yosemite, the park her husband helped make famous in his classic photographs of Half Dome and the Yosemite Valley, took hold much earlier and flourished far longer than the better-known Ansel's.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Over at Essay Daily (which calls itself “A Filter for and An Ongoing Conversation About Essays and Magazines About Writing”), John D'Agata offers a brief meditation on Ansel Adams - and the moment he understood that photographs were not taken so much as made. The year was 1927, and Adams “hadn't figured out yet how to make photography work, how to render with light and luck and dark the deep and powerful truths that he felt when in the mountains.” He was in Yosemite, shooting images of Half Dome, when, as an experiment, he decided to use “a heavy red filter that immediately darkens the sky, transforms it even darker than the cliff face itself, so that an abyss opens up on the left side of the cliff, as if the brooding shelf of Half Dome has torn straight through it like a cleaver made of light.” This, D'Agata suggests, is the turning point: when Adams stopped merely being someone who shot pictures and became an artist, with all the intentionality it implies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
Are photographers vandals? Does the mere presence of a camera at an ordinary place or extraordinary event inevitably damage the experience of it, as vandalism does? Is photography a powerful creative tool for the willful destruction of established art, all in the service of making new possibilities and unexpected ways of seeing? These questions, provocative and surprising, began to be posed in 1974 by artist John Divola, then 25 and just out of school. Born and raised in the San Fernando Valley, an area whose wholesale transformation from rural to suburban shifted into overdrive after World War II, during his youth, Divola studied first at Cal State Northridge and then UCLA.
NEWS
July 18, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The Hawaii works by painter Georgia O'Keeffe and photographer Ansel Adams will be featured in a special exhibition at the Honolulu Museum of Art beginning Friday. O'Keeffe is best known for her colorful portrayals of flowers and the Southwest, and Adams for his expansive California landscapes. But both found a wealth of subjects during their visits to Hawaii . O'Keeffe traveled to the islands in 1939 to create advertising illustrations for Hawaii Pineapple Co. (now Dole)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2012 | By Suzanne Muchnic
Eleanor Callahan, whose ever-changing image became a sensitively nuanced chapter of photography history — composed of pictures taken over more than 50 years by her husband, Harry Callahan — died Tuesday in an Atlanta hospice. She was 95. The cause was cancer, said her daughter, Barbara Callahan. The couple met on a blind date in 1933, when Eleanor was a secretary at Chrysler Motors in Detroit and Harry was a clerk at the firm. They were married three years later, forging a remarkably close relationship that lasted until Harry's death in 1999 and produced hundreds of imaginatively composed black-and-white portraits.
TRAVEL
January 8, 2012
To learn more For information on photography classes offered by the Ansel Adams Gallery, go to http://www.anseladams.com . The free photo walks are offered at 9 a.m. on Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays and are limited to 15 people. The children's photo walk - which is open to adults - is offered only in summer. Call (209) 372-4413 to reserve space.
TRAVEL
January 8, 2012 | Terry Gardner
"Great shot," my friend said. "Yeah, my Canon G10 is really smart. " After two years of mumbling, "Shutter speed, ISO -- I don't know," as I put my camera in auto (or "idiot-proof") mode, it seemed time for me to know as much about photography as my camera knew. So recently I headed to Yosemite National Park and the Ansel Adams Gallery, which offers free camera walks, as well as photo classes and multi-day workshops for a fee, taught by staff photographers. Many of the iconic Yosemite photos I adore were shot by Adams, who died in 1984, and I thought a lesson here would be the nearest thing to learning from the man himself.
NEWS
January 8, 1991 | PAMELA MARIN
Picture This About 150 guests convened in a see-through tent attached to the Fine Arts Gallery at UC Irvine on Saturday night--the first locals to get a look at some Ansel Adams photographs on display through February. The guests--school types, art types, business types--sipped champagne and cocktails at the tent site, circled the gallery rooms, then shuttled to the student center for dinner and a peek at another selection from the late photographer's prodigious oeuvre.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
A wall painter for the Fresno school district who bought a cache of antique glass-plate photographic negatives at a garage sale 10 years ago laid out his case Tuesday that they were created by Ansel Adams early in his career, offering affirmations from photographic and forensic experts he had hired. In a Beverly Hills gallery packed with reporters and photographers, Rick Norsigian and the Beverly Hills law firm that is helping him market prints made from the negatives (and promote a documentary about his find)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2011 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Ending a legal dispute that began last summer, Rick Norsigian has agreed to stop using Ansel Adams' name, likeness, or the "Ansel Adams" trademark as he continues to sell prints and posters of Yosemite and coastal California that he has long contended document "lost negatives" shot by the great nature photographer. Norsigian has spent the last decade trying to prove that the 65 old-fashioned glass-plate negatives he bought at a Fresno garage sale were taken by Adams in the 1920s and 1930s and represent a previously missing chapter in the photographer's oeuvre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Works from the three leading players in this summer's big art-photography controversy will be hung in a Los Angeles gallery on Saturday for a brief exhibition aimed at giving folks a chance to see what the hubbub is all about, and decide for themselves. One is Ansel Adams, America's greatest nature photographer, who'll be represented by about 20 prints — hand-developed and signed by Adams himself and guaranteed to be authentic by the Duncan Miller Gallery in West Los Angeles, which is putting on the show.
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