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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1999
What could the frozen continent of Antarctica possibly have in common with the extremely hot sands of the Sahara? Both are deserts with little rainfall. And yet Antarctica, whose composition is 98% ice, is responsible for 70% of the world's freshwater. Discover Antarctica's amazing plants and animals and learn about this continent's important role in the world's ecology through the direct links on the Times Launch Point Web site: http://www.latimes.com/launchpoint.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
When Sean "Stanley" Leary's friends heard he'd gone missing in Utah's Zion National Park, they drove hundreds of miles to help. Leary was well-known in the tight-knit world of mountain adventurers. At Yosemite National Park, he was an old hand, with more than 50 ascents of El Capitan under his belt - including a record-setting 2 1/2-hour scramble up a 2,900-foot wall that demands several days from seasoned climbers. He explored new routes up peaks in the Arctic and in Antarctica and was an ardent BASE jumper - an adventure enthusiast who leaps off mountains and other high places.
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NEWS
May 28, 1989 | Source: Associated Press
Here are some facts and figures about Antarctica. History: Britain's Capt. James Cook is believed to have first entered Antarctic waters during an expedition from 1773 to 1775, and was followed by several other mariners who discovered land there in the early 1800s. The American Capt. Charles Wilkes first identified it as a continent in 1840, when he traced 1,500 miles of coastline. The first inland expeditions were carried out by Norway's Leonard Kristensen and Britain's Robert F. Scott and Ernest Shackleton in the late 1800s and early 1900s.
NEWS
December 10, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
The lowest temperature recorded on Earth may have been logged in Antarctica on Aug. 10, 2010: a reading of 135.8 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (or minus 93.2 degrees Celsius). That unfathomably frigid temperature reading, taken via NASA satellite, was part of an effort by American scientists to locate the coldest spot on the planet. Turns out, there are a string of extremely cold spots, pockets of unbelievable chill at high elevations in Antarctica. Researchers at the National Snow and Ice Data Center reported the findings at a news conference Monday during the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting in San Francisco.
NEWS
June 23, 2012 | Los Angeles Times
For the final leg of his six-month backpacking adventure last year, Robert Fawcett took a 12-day trip to Antarctica. Although he had traveled to 11 countries and visited destinations such as Everest Base Camp in Nepal and Angkor Watt in Cambodia, the frozen continent still left him awestruck. "The sheer beauty of the ice, coupled with extremely intimate wildlife encounters, made for a trip that was pure magic," he said. The Santa Monica resident used a Canon EOS 60D.     View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
NEWS
March 13, 2011
In this photo shot by Times reader "mantin," a penguin investigates a leopard seal as his friends stand by to watch this potentially fatal encounter. Unfortunately for this brave little guy, leopard seals are one of Antarctica's top predators and are known to eat penguins.   Interested in feedback from Los Angeles Times photographers? Come join us at the L.A. Times Travel & Adventure Show  March 19 and 20 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Panels topics include tips for better travel photos and family vacation photos made easy.
SCIENCE
July 13, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Ancient volcanoes discovered deep in the ocean off Antarctica may explain a climate mystery critical to predicting Earth's fate as humans pump more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. University of Texas geologists dredging thousands of feet below the surface of the central Scotia Sea off the southeastern tip of South America hauled up volcanic rock after their sonar mapping showed formations that looked uncannily like a sunken island chain. “It just didn't look like real ocean floor,” said geologist Ian W. Dalziel, of the University of Texas, Austin, lead author of the paper published Thursday in the journal Geology.
NEWS
December 10, 2013 | By Amy Hubbard
The lowest temperature recorded on Earth may have been logged in Antarctica on Aug. 10, 2010: a reading of 135.8 degrees below zero Fahrenheit (or minus 93.2 degrees Celsius). That unfathomably frigid temperature reading, taken via NASA satellite, was part of an effort by American scientists to locate the coldest spot on the planet. Turns out, there are a string of extremely cold spots, pockets of unbelievable chill at high elevations in Antarctica. Researchers at the National Snow and Ice Data Center reported the findings at a news conference Monday during the American Geophysical Union's annual meeting in San Francisco.
SCIENCE
April 1, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Amundsen and Scott may have to share billing with Confucius and Mao Tse-tung when China publishes a new map of Antarctica in 2007. Chinese researchers back from a four-month expedition said 46 newly surveyed Antarctic islands would receive Chinese names, state media said Wednesday. Scholars, politicians, emperors and artists figured high on the 160-name shortlist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1990 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers from UC Santa Barbara have been chosen by the National Science Foundation to establish a new Long-Term Ecological Research Site in Antarctica, the foundation announced last week. NSF currently has 17 such sites elsewhere to monitor slow changes in the environment, but this will be the first on the southernmost continent. The $500,000-a-year project is designed to monitor the ice-dominated marine ecosystem at the bottom of the world.
SCIENCE
November 17, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A volcano may be stirring more than a half-mile beneath a major ice sheet in Antarctica, raising the possibility of faster base melting that could ultimately affect climate. Seismologists working in a mountainous area of Marie Byrd Land in western Antarctica detected a swarm of low-magnitude earthquakes in 2010 and 2011 similar to those that can precede volcanic eruptions, according to a study published online Sunday in Nature Geoscience. The area of activity lies close to the youngest in a chain of volcanoes that formed over several million years, and the characteristics and depth of the seismic events are consistent with those found in volcanic areas of Alaska's Aleutian Islands, the Pacific Northest, Hawaii and Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines, the study concludes.
SCIENCE
August 22, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A three-century record of penguin poop shows that the flightless birds probably thrived during the Little Ice Age, a Chinese research team says. Contrary to some reports that the Adelie penguin fared better in warmer conditions, when sea ice broke up, Earth scientist Zhou-Quing Xie of the University of Science and Technology in Hefei, China, says that from 1490 to 1670, the middle of the so-called Little Ice Age, Adelies thrived on Ross Island off...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
A submarine designed to explore beneath the ice shelves of Antarctica is taking a detour in Lake Tahoe this week for an unusual expedition. The unmanned vessel is diving more than 1,000 feet to scour the lake's bottom and capture valuable data and high-definition images of an earthquake fault that scientists have wondered about for years. Since 1998, when the West Tahoe fault was first put on the map, engineers have tried different ways to decipher the underwater fault, which they estimate - based on shore studies - is capable of producing a 7.1 to 7.4 magnitude earthquake and tsunamis up to 30 feet high every 2,500 to 4,000 years.
SCIENCE
July 13, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Ancient volcanoes discovered deep in the ocean off Antarctica may explain a climate mystery critical to predicting Earth's fate as humans pump more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. University of Texas geologists dredging thousands of feet below the surface of the central Scotia Sea off the southeastern tip of South America hauled up volcanic rock after their sonar mapping showed formations that looked uncannily like a sunken island chain. “It just didn't look like real ocean floor,” said geologist Ian W. Dalziel, of the University of Texas, Austin, lead author of the paper published Thursday in the journal Geology.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Antarctica's Lake Vostok doesn't seem like the most hospitable home on the planet for any kind of life. Trapped under a glacier 2.3 miles thick, it's subject to extreme pressures, extreme cold, extreme heat (possibly from hydrothermal vents) and lack of light. And yet scientists studying ice cores from the sub-glacial lake have discovered 3,507 distinct genetic fragments indicating a remarkable diversity of life under the ice. The findings, published by the journal PLOS ONE, show that the Antarctic lake -- the largest subglacial lake in the world, and the seventh largest overall in volume -- may be home to a complex ecosystem, and could fuel the hopes of researchers looking for alien life on other worlds, such as Jupiter's icy moon Europa.
TRAVEL
July 6, 2013
When taking a car trip with your kids, have them wear slip-on shoes. Otherwise, you'll spend time at every stop while they fish around for their shoes, untie them and retie them. M. Molen Oceanside When traveling through several states or countries, I take a picture of a license plate to help identify where I am when looking through hundreds of pictures. Sandy Hoaglund Valencia When traveling to Antarctica, select a ship that carries 100 or fewer passengers. Ships are allowed to disembark only 100 passengers at a time to protect the environment.
SCIENCE
July 24, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Another meteorite from Mars has been discovered in Antarctica, one of only about 30 known Martian space rocks on Earth. What makes this rock special is its comparatively large size, said Timothy J. McCoy, curator of meteorites at the Smithsonian Institution. "It's a 700-gram rock [about 1 1/2 pounds] but by meteorite standards it's a mountain of material," he said.
SCIENCE
May 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Vast areas of Antarctica melted in 2005 when temperatures rose for a week, in a process that may accelerate invisible melting deep beneath the surface, NASA said this week. An analysis of satellite data showed that an area the size of California melted and then refroze -- the most significant thawing in 30 years.
SCIENCE
June 21, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Last month was among the hottest Mays in the 134-year global record, tying with 1998 and 2005 as the third warmest. According to an analysis released Thursday by the National Climatic Data Center, May's combined average temperature over global land and ocean surfaces was 1.19°F above the 20th century average of 58.6°F. The agency reported that regions experiencing record warmth included north-central Siberia, west-central Australia, parts of northern and eastern Europe, portions of northern Africa and the Philippines.
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Who can resist those snappy little personality quizzes? Somehow it feels as though some great mystery about ourselves will be revealed, though it never is. Still, you might have been spending a lot of time wondering whether you're an Adelie sort of penguin or a Chinstrap. The people at Pew Charitable Trusts' environmental group seemingly have been aware of how many sleepless nights you've had pondering this very issue, so they came up with a Penguin Personality Quiz . The official reason is that Thursday is World Penguin Day -- because of course every month, every week, every day, is named for something, and I'm not just talking about the sun, the moon and Norse gods.
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