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Antennas

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA
A cellular telephone company will ask the Moulton Niguel Water District on Thursday for permission to install six communications antennas in four South County communities. Water district officials will vote on whether to allow Cox California Personal Communications Systems Inc. to build the antennas on water district reservoir tanks and sites in Mission Viejo, Laguna Hills, Aliso Viejo and Laguna Niguel.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1996 | JOHN POPE
Concerned that recent changes in federal telecommunications laws may produce an explosion of towers and antennas across the city, officials are taking steps to regulate the equipment. The Telecommunications Reform Act, signed into law earlier this year by President Clinton, was a sweeping reform of the industry. It removed monopoly protections so that telephone companies, cable companies and others in the communications industry now can compete in each other's markets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
They are tall, they are hot and, city officials said, they tend to be pretty ugly. That was the justification for imposing an immediate interim law this week to regulate wireless antenna facilities in the city. "Presently, installation of a new antenna requires a conditional-use permit, but the Planning Commission has very little discretion regarding aesthetics," said Rick Warsinski, acting director of development services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1996 | JOHN CANALIS
The City Council lifted a moratorium on wireless communication antennas Tuesday, setting strict guidelines on where the devices can be placed. Working with representatives of cellular service companies, officials agreed to allow free-standing transmitters only in industrial and commercial areas. The devices must be at least 100 feet from residential neighborhoods, and special approval is required near churches, parks and schools.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
The City Council today will discuss proposed regulations for companies erecting wireless telecommunications facilities in the city. The proposed changes to the zoning and local coastal codes would provide stricter regulations on where telecommunications companies can place their equipment. In the last two months, the Planning Commission and City Council have received requests for permits by several companies, including Pacific Bell Mobile Services and Cox Communications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1997 | KIMBERLY BROWER
The City Council this week upheld a Planning Commission decision to deny a request to put a wireless communication antenna in Monarch Beach Terrace. But the council voted to let the Planning Commission amend Pacific Bell's application so that the company can seek another site for the equipment, and to let other applicants revise pending requests. "We took a difficult decision and hopefully made everyone happy," Mayor William L.Ossenmacher said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1994 | ANTONIO OLIVO
A group of Encino homeowners has appealed the Los Angeles City Planning Commission's decision to allow a cellular phone antenna to exceed height limits atop a Ventura Boulevard office building. In the second community action since August against Airtouch Cellular's project, Homeowners of Encino has filed a letter with the Los Angeles City Council that refutes justifications made by the Planning Commission to give the go-ahead to the project at 17547 Ventura Blvd. in Encino.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The state's top court has declined to intervene in the legal fight over the completion of a $21.5-million public safety radio system. The California Supreme Court will not review an appeal by two Tiburon families and the town of Tiburon, which had sought to block construction of a 72-foot radio antenna in a residential neighborhood. The Marin Emergency Radio Authority wants to build the tower to complete a countywide public safety radio system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1996 | DAVID E. BRADY
Hoping to reduce opposition to a proposal to build a cellular telephone antenna in Chatsworth, representatives from a telecommunications company will meet with area residents Thursday night to discuss the project. In its initial application, L.A. Cellular sought a conditional-use permit to build a 60-foot "monopole" at 10239 Vassar Ave., behind a photographic supply business, a project that many residents have denounced as aesthetically at odds with the surrounding community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
A proposal for a cellular phone antenna atop a light pole in a neighborhood park has been scrapped after months of protests by residents. "We are putting aside the plans for the time being," said Steven C. Crosby, a spokesman for LA Cellular. "We do need more coverage in that area, but we are looking at alternatives." City officials signed an agreement with the company in August allowing an 8-foot antenna to be attached to a 60-foot baseball field light in Bonita Creek Park.
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