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Anthony Dwain Lee

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000
Re "Police Release Details of Party Shooting," Oct. 31: Whatever happened to the good old days when, if a complaint came in, the cops went to the house, knocked on the front door and when it was opened warned, "Let's keep the noise down, folks"? Now they sneak furtively around the house in the dark and shoot at the guests through the windows. In my mind the killing of Anthony Dwain Lee, a charming, talented and innocent man, can only be viewed as murder. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles The culprit in the tragic shooting of Lee is not really Officer Tarriel Hopper.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2000
LAPD Sgt. Daniel Witman (letter, Dec. 8) states that a Dec. 7 editorial should have paid more attention to the actions of Anthony Dwain Lee than those of the officer who shot him four times in the back. Witman points to the things that Lee "chose" to do at the party and the fact that Lee had "hours" to plan his day to avoid what happened to him. Let's just turn this around. Officer Tarriel Hopper got a call complaining about noise at a party. Hopper "chose" not to wait, as instructed, for the host of the party.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The television actor killed by a Los Angeles police officer responding to a noise complaint at a Halloween party was shot once in the back of the head and three times in the back, wounds that appear to contradict police accounts, according to an autopsy report released Monday. Police said Anthony Dwain Lee was killed Oct. 28 at a Benedict Canyon mansion after pointing a replica handgun at an officer standing outside a glass door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2000 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the "LAPD has never seen a shooting they didn't think they could justify," attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. filed a $100-million claim Monday against the city in the death of actor Anthony Dwain Lee. Cochran said he hopes that the claim filed on behalf of Lee's sister, the first step toward a lawsuit, will force the Police Department to improve officers' training and develop policies to deal with noise complaints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends and family--from Hollywood to his hometown high school--gathered here Saturday to celebrate the life of Anthony Dwain Lee, never dwelling long on the circumstance of his death. "I'm going to ask you to help me take this bitter poison and turn it into medicine," said Tina Lee-Vogt, sister of the 39-year-old actor who was shot to death Oct. 28 by a Los Angeles Police Department officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000
Re "Couple Found Slain Hours After Police Call to Home," Nov. 2: L.A. police officers respond to a noise complaint in Benedict Canyon, and an innocent man is killed. Officers respond to a call for a possible slaying at an apartment in Arleta and leave without ever finding two dead bodies inside. Sounds like somebody needs to get their priorities straight. TERRY BRANNON Los Angeles The death of Anthony Dwain Lee is, without question, a tragedy. Listening to Mike Downey (Nov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2000
LAPD Sgt. Daniel Witman (letter, Dec. 8) states that a Dec. 7 editorial should have paid more attention to the actions of Anthony Dwain Lee than those of the officer who shot him four times in the back. Witman points to the things that Lee "chose" to do at the party and the fact that Lee had "hours" to plan his day to avoid what happened to him. Let's just turn this around. Officer Tarriel Hopper got a call complaining about noise at a party. Hopper "chose" not to wait, as instructed, for the host of the party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000
Re "Officer Believed He Was About to Be Shot," Commentary, Nov. 12: While it is Ted Hunt's and Mitzi Grasso's job to protect LAPD officers, their defense is misplaced. I do not dispute that an officer's job in the field is "laden with fear and doubt." But all human beings, especially those in law enforcement, observe their surroundings. This officer knew that this was a Halloween party at a million-dollar home, in a million-dollar neighborhood, with privately hired security on the grounds.
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | SUE FOX and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The fake gun held by Anthony Dwain Lee was an exact black rubber copy, the kind allowed on movie and TV sets but illegal to sell or brandish in a threatening manner under local and state laws. In 1987, Los Angeles became the first major U.S. city to outlaw the manufacture and sale of realistic toy guns after KNBC-TV consumer reporter David Horowitz was held hostage on the air by a man wielding a toy pistol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2000 | KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the "LAPD has never seen a shooting they didn't think they could justify," attorney Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. filed a $100-million claim Monday against the city in the death of actor Anthony Dwain Lee. Cochran said he hopes that the claim filed on behalf of Lee's sister, the first step toward a lawsuit, will force the Police Department to improve officers' training and develop policies to deal with noise complaints.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2000 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The television actor killed by a Los Angeles police officer responding to a noise complaint at a Halloween party was shot once in the back of the head and three times in the back, wounds that appear to contradict police accounts, according to an autopsy report released Monday. Police said Anthony Dwain Lee was killed Oct. 28 at a Benedict Canyon mansion after pointing a replica handgun at an officer standing outside a glass door.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000 | NANCY VOGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Friends and family--from Hollywood to his hometown high school--gathered here Saturday to celebrate the life of Anthony Dwain Lee, never dwelling long on the circumstance of his death. "I'm going to ask you to help me take this bitter poison and turn it into medicine," said Tina Lee-Vogt, sister of the 39-year-old actor who was shot to death Oct. 28 by a Los Angeles Police Department officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2000
Re "Officer Believed He Was About to Be Shot," Commentary, Nov. 12: While it is Ted Hunt's and Mitzi Grasso's job to protect LAPD officers, their defense is misplaced. I do not dispute that an officer's job in the field is "laden with fear and doubt." But all human beings, especially those in law enforcement, observe their surroundings. This officer knew that this was a Halloween party at a million-dollar home, in a million-dollar neighborhood, with privately hired security on the grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2000
Re "Couple Found Slain Hours After Police Call to Home," Nov. 2: L.A. police officers respond to a noise complaint in Benedict Canyon, and an innocent man is killed. Officers respond to a call for a possible slaying at an apartment in Arleta and leave without ever finding two dead bodies inside. Sounds like somebody needs to get their priorities straight. TERRY BRANNON Los Angeles The death of Anthony Dwain Lee is, without question, a tragedy. Listening to Mike Downey (Nov.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | JOSH MEYER CARLA HALL and KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He loved the Castle. Five stories of domed ceilings and glass walls, perched on a slender stem of a street in the hills of Benedict Canyon. It was five miles and a million dollars from his little box of an apartment in Van Nuys. Of course, Anthony Dwain Lee was at the Halloween costume party at the Castle. One of his friends lived there. That night, a deejay spun house music. Bartenders posed as Catholic schoolgirls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2000
Re "Police Release Details of Party Shooting," Oct. 31: Whatever happened to the good old days when, if a complaint came in, the cops went to the house, knocked on the front door and when it was opened warned, "Let's keep the noise down, folks"? Now they sneak furtively around the house in the dark and shoot at the guests through the windows. In my mind the killing of Anthony Dwain Lee, a charming, talented and innocent man, can only be viewed as murder. JAMES PRIDEAUX Los Angeles The culprit in the tragic shooting of Lee is not really Officer Tarriel Hopper.
NEWS
November 1, 2000 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Anthony Dwain Lee and others were laughing at a joke near the end of a Halloween party when a police officer shined his flashlight at them through a glass door and fired nine shots as Lee turned toward the light, holding a fake gun, lawyer Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. said Tuesday, based on witness interviews.
NEWS
November 5, 2000 | JOSH MEYER CARLA HALL and KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He loved the Castle. Five stories of domed ceilings and glass walls, perched on a slender stem of a street in the hills of Benedict Canyon. It was five miles and a million dollars from his little box of an apartment in Van Nuys. Of course, Anthony Dwain Lee was at the Halloween costume party at the Castle. One of his friends lived there. That night, a deejay spun house music. Bartenders posed as Catholic schoolgirls.
NEWS
November 1, 2000 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actor Anthony Dwain Lee and others were laughing at a joke near the end of a Halloween party when a police officer shined his flashlight at them through a glass door and fired nine shots as Lee turned toward the light, holding a fake gun, lawyer Johnnie L. Cochran Jr. said Tuesday, based on witness interviews.
NEWS
October 31, 2000 | JOSH MEYER SUE FOX and KURT STREETER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Police Department on Monday rallied around an officer who shot and killed a man at a weekend Halloween costume party, saying that he too was a victim of a tragic set of circumstances. Authorities say Anthony Dwain Lee was pointing an authentic-looking rubber replica of a .357 magnum semi-automatic Desert Eagle at police when he was shot. It was not clear where Lee, an up-and-coming actor, got the replica.
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