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Anthony Shadid

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NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been corrected. See note below.
The National Book Foundation announced the finalists for the National Book Awards on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" show Wednesday. Junot Diaz, who was recently named a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow, is among the fiction finalists for his short-story collection, “This Is How You Lose Her.” Two other fiction finalists -- Ben Fountain's “Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk” and “The Yellow Birds” by Kevin Powers -- deal with America's long military...
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NEWS
October 10, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been corrected. See note below.
The National Book Foundation announced the finalists for the National Book Awards on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" show Wednesday. Junot Diaz, who was recently named a MacArthur “Genius” Fellow, is among the fiction finalists for his short-story collection, “This Is How You Lose Her.” Two other fiction finalists -- Ben Fountain's “Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk” and “The Yellow Birds” by Kevin Powers -- deal with America's long military...
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012 | By Lorraine Ali, Special to Tribune Newspapers
A yearning for home, wherever that may be, is one of many themes that the late New York Times journalist Anthony Shadid so deftly touches on in "House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East. " Shadid, a Lebanese American who was born and raised in Oklahoma City, takes leave from his job as a Middle East war reporter in 2007 to rebuild the abandoned and war-ravaged home of his great grandfather in the small Lebanese town of Marjayoun. But even before he takes on the project, Shadid's idea of the Middle East as an ancestral home, a place that yields answers to personal and family questions, is challenged by what he finds during his years covering bloody conflicts in Israel (where he was shot in the shoulder by an Israeli sniper while reporting from the West Bank for the Boston Globe)
NATIONAL
June 25, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Those who were there said the crowd gasped. Ed Shadid, the cousin of late New York Times reporter Anthony Shadid, was speaking at a banquet for the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee on Saturday night in Washington, D.C. He had been offering advice on how people could support Anthony's causes when he dropped a bombshell that instantly hit Twitter and later made headlines at Politico and Gawker. “It's not the rosy picture, I'm trying to say, that was portrayed,” Ed Shadid said of the New York Times' depiction of his cousin's decision to go into  Syria.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York -- Anthony Shadid, a journalist who gave voice to those muffled by the turmoil around them — from Iraqi families enveloped in civil war to young Libyans spurred to take up arms against a dictator — died while doing just that: reporting from Syria in defiance of official attempts to limit media coverage of the bloodshed there. Shadid, who died Thursday at 43, was stricken by an apparent asthma attack while preparing to leave Syria with his New York Times colleague, photographer Tyler Hicks.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Those who were there said the crowd gasped. Ed Shadid, the cousin of late New York Times reporter Anthony Shadid, was speaking at a banquet for the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee on Saturday night in Washington, D.C. He had been offering advice on how people could support Anthony's causes when he dropped a bombshell that instantly hit Twitter and later made headlines at Politico and Gawker. “It's not the rosy picture, I'm trying to say, that was portrayed,” Ed Shadid said of the New York Times' depiction of his cousin's decision to go into  Syria.
BOOKS
September 4, 2005 | Geraldine Brooks, Geraldine Brooks, a former correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, is the author of the novels "March" and "Year of Wonders" and the nonfiction books "Nine Parts of Desire" and "Foreign Correspondence."
ANTHONY SHADID is a formidable journalist. His dispatches from Iraq for the Washington Post, for which he won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, are remarkable for their insight and graceful writing. Shadid has everything required for that assignment: a deep knowledge of Arab society, fluency in the language, personal courage and an empathy that allows him to engage with both Iraqis and U.S.
OPINION
February 24, 2012 | By Timothy M. Phelps
Marie Colvin and I covered our first combat together in 1986, after the U.S. bombed Libya. She was 30, pretty, ambitious and talented. She soon had Col. Moammar Kadafi and his aides in her thrall and parlayed her many scoops for United Press International into a job as a foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times of London. I last saw her a year ago, in Cairo during the revolution. Three decades of bearing witness to war showed in her face: I recognized her only from her black eye patch, which she had worn since a hand grenade destroyed her left eye in Sri Lanka in 2001.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
New York Times foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid died Thursday after suffering an apparent asthma attack while on assignment in Syria.  He was 43 years old. According to an Associated Press report, New York Times photographer Tyler Hicks, who was traveling with Shadid, said that thePulitzer Prize-winningreporter had also suffered a bout a week earlier. The attack Thursday was more severe: Shadid reportedly lost consciousness and collapsed.  His breathing became “very faint” and “very shallow,” Hicks said, and ceased completely after a few minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012
House of Stone A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East Anthony Shadid Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 311 pp., $26
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 2012 | By Lorraine Ali, Special to Tribune Newspapers
A yearning for home, wherever that may be, is one of many themes that the late New York Times journalist Anthony Shadid so deftly touches on in "House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East. " Shadid, a Lebanese American who was born and raised in Oklahoma City, takes leave from his job as a Middle East war reporter in 2007 to rebuild the abandoned and war-ravaged home of his great grandfather in the small Lebanese town of Marjayoun. But even before he takes on the project, Shadid's idea of the Middle East as an ancestral home, a place that yields answers to personal and family questions, is challenged by what he finds during his years covering bloody conflicts in Israel (where he was shot in the shoulder by an Israeli sniper while reporting from the West Bank for the Boston Globe)
OPINION
February 24, 2012 | By Timothy M. Phelps
Marie Colvin and I covered our first combat together in 1986, after the U.S. bombed Libya. She was 30, pretty, ambitious and talented. She soon had Col. Moammar Kadafi and his aides in her thrall and parlayed her many scoops for United Press International into a job as a foreign correspondent for the Sunday Times of London. I last saw her a year ago, in Cairo during the revolution. Three decades of bearing witness to war showed in her face: I recognized her only from her black eye patch, which she had worn since a hand grenade destroyed her left eye in Sri Lanka in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2012 | By Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from New York -- Anthony Shadid, a journalist who gave voice to those muffled by the turmoil around them — from Iraqi families enveloped in civil war to young Libyans spurred to take up arms against a dictator — died while doing just that: reporting from Syria in defiance of official attempts to limit media coverage of the bloodshed there. Shadid, who died Thursday at 43, was stricken by an apparent asthma attack while preparing to leave Syria with his New York Times colleague, photographer Tyler Hicks.
NEWS
February 17, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
New York Times foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid died Thursday after suffering an apparent asthma attack while on assignment in Syria.  He was 43 years old. According to an Associated Press report, New York Times photographer Tyler Hicks, who was traveling with Shadid, said that thePulitzer Prize-winningreporter had also suffered a bout a week earlier. The attack Thursday was more severe: Shadid reportedly lost consciousness and collapsed.  His breathing became “very faint” and “very shallow,” Hicks said, and ceased completely after a few minutes.
BOOKS
September 4, 2005 | Geraldine Brooks, Geraldine Brooks, a former correspondent for the Wall Street Journal, is the author of the novels "March" and "Year of Wonders" and the nonfiction books "Nine Parts of Desire" and "Foreign Correspondence."
ANTHONY SHADID is a formidable journalist. His dispatches from Iraq for the Washington Post, for which he won the 2004 Pulitzer Prize for international reporting, are remarkable for their insight and graceful writing. Shadid has everything required for that assignment: a deep knowledge of Arab society, fluency in the language, personal courage and an empathy that allows him to engage with both Iraqis and U.S.
WORLD
March 17, 2011 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The New York Times reported Wednesday that four of its journalists covering the fighting in Libya were missing. The newspaper said it had received secondhand information that reporters Anthony Shadid and Stephen Farrell and photographers Tyler Hicks and Lynsey Addario had been picked up by government forces near Ajdabiya. "We have talked with officials of the Libyan government in Tripoli, and they tell us they are attempting to ascertain the whereabouts of our journalists," said Bill Keller, the paper's editor.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2010
The winners PUBLIC SERVICE The Bristol (Va.) Herald Courier BREAKING NEWS REPORTING The Seattle Times staff INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING Barbara Laker and Wendy Ruderman of the Philadelphia Daily News, and Sheri Fink of ProPublica, in collaboration with the New York Times Magazine EXPLANATORY REPORTING Michael Moss and members of the New York Times staff LOCAL REPORTING Raquel Rutledge of the Milwaukee...
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