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Anthony Smith

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SPORTS
August 30, 1991 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a gripping story that Anthony Smith, now a Raider defensive end, told of his childhood. In 1989, while at the University of Arizona, Smith told Times sportswriter Steve Springer and a reporter from the Arizona Republic that he had risen from a life of crime and overcome a serious drug problem. Orphaned at 3, Smith said, he had been shuffled from relative to relative and had been swallowed up quickly by the urban jungle of New York.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
The evening that brothers Kevin and Ricky Nettles were abducted outside their Los Angeles mechanic's shop, one of their employees said they were visited by an armed man who looked like a police detective. The employee, 67, described in court last week how on that November day in 1999 he saw onetime Los Angeles and Oakland Raiders defensive end Anthony Wayne Smith stop Ricky Nettles in the street and usher him into the back of a car, where another man sat behind the wheel. "He told me he was taking [Ricky]
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BOOKS
January 14, 1990 | SONJA BOLLE
"For many portions of the world, their exploration by Europeans was a brief affair," observes Anthony Smith in "Explorers of the Amazon." "The mystery of the Nile was speedily unravelled after brave individuals had ventured west from Zanzibar to encounter Lake Victoria. The first shipload of immigrants reached Australia in 1788, and within 80 years most of the major traverses had been achieved. Men first saw Antarctica in 1820 and had reached its pole within a century."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2012 | Ann M. Simmons and Sam Farmer
Anthony Wayne Smith was a top draft pick of the Los Angeles Raiders in 1990, a barrel-chested rising star. He excelled as a defensive end. He amassed cash and bought a plush Playa del Rey pad. He found love. But only months after his football career ended, prosecutors allege, Smith killed two men -- and two more in the years that followed. A jury deadlocked on one murder charge against the North Carolina native in April; charges against him in three other cold-case murders were filed as he awaited retrial.
SPORTS
July 29, 1993 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was nearly 6 in the evening, but the temperature at St. Edward's University still hovered near 100 degrees. For most of the Raiders and Dallas Cowboys, another wearying day of double practice sessions was over. Time to grab some food and maybe take a dip in the pool before the night strategy meetings. But for the defensive linemen, the physical part of the day wasn't quite over. Having removed their bulky shoulder pads, they were still jogging up and down the field.
SPORTS
September 4, 1994 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a lifetime of climbing, he sits on top of the hill. But he sits alone. After a lifetime of dreaming, he has realized his fantasies. But with them have come nightmares. At 27, Anthony Smith has become the leader of the Raiders' defensive line and the owner of a new, three-story home high on a Playa del Rey hill, the city spread out before him. He has gone from poverty to wealth, from obscurity to fame. Last winter, he signed a four-year, $7.6-million contract with the Raiders.
SPORTS
December 8, 1992 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Can you envision a pinch-hitter leading the major leagues in home runs? Can you picture a sixth man coming off the bench to lead the NBA in scoring? Can you imagine a power-play specialist leading the NHL in goals? On the Raiders, no such imagination is required. Just look at Anthony Smith. Smith, a defensive lineman in only his second season, got two sacks Sunday against the Kansas City Chiefs to take over the conference lead with 13, giving Smith an average of one a game.
SPORTS
November 5, 1992 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One man is 53, the other 25. One lives in Calgary and the other in Los Angeles. One has tasted fame and glory, the other hungers for it. Defensive lineman Anthony Smith of the Raiders and Deacon Jones, a former Ram lineman and a member of pro football's Hall of Fame, would appear to be at opposite ends of the spectrum. But these opposites attract.
SPORTS
November 10, 1989 | STEVE SPRINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anthony Smith was only 8, but he wanted a Cadillac. That Cadillac. The one next door. The one he saw his neighbor come out and warm up on those cold New York mornings. An orphan since 3, Smith had drifted from relative to relative. At 8, he was living with his Aunt Netti. She drank a lot, leaving Smith and his three brothers and two sisters to run the house and make the decisions, and Smith's decision was to get that car.
SPORTS
October 5, 1996 | Associated Press
Defensive end Anthony Smith reported to the Oakland Raiders, nearly a week after announcing he was leaving the team. Smith was put on reserve and remained suspended without pay, the Raiders said Friday. He would not travel with the team for Sunday's game against the New York Jets. A spokesman for Smith announced last week that Smith would no longer play for the Raiders. He left the team last Thursday for his home in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
Anthony Wayne Smith, a former Oakland Raiders defensive end who is awaiting a retrial for his alleged role in the 2008 murder of a Lancaster man, has been charged with three additional murders, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office confirmed Wednesday. A criminal complaint, filed Monday, includes the original murder charge involving the slaying of Maurilo Ponce but also accuses Smith of the 1999 killings of brothers Kevin and Ricky Nettles and the murder of Dennis Henderson in 2001.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
The trial of a former Oakland Raiders defensive end accused of murder ended in a mistrial Wednesday when jurors failed to reach agreement on a verdict, according to authorities. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Carlos A. Chung terminated the trial after jurors were unable to reach a verdict on whether Anthony Wayne Smith was involved in the killing of 31-year-old mechanic Maurilio Ponce on Oct. 7, 2008. The jury, which deliberated for nine days, split 8 to 4 for a guilty verdict, said Sandi Gibbons, a spokeswoman for the L.A. County district attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2012 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
The trial of a former Oakland Raiders defensive end accused of participating in the "execution" of an acquaintance in a desolate corner of Lancaster may hinge on cellphone records and a taped interview with the weeping defendant. Before jurors began deliberating in earnest Friday, prosecutors argued that Anthony Wayne Smith was crying "crocodile tears" when he told investigators he wasn't involved in the death of 31-year-old mechanic Maurilio Ponce on Oct. 7, 2008. Cellphone tracking technology placed Smith and two accomplices near the death scene, the prosecutor said, and Smith was found with the victim's cellphone, car and keys.
SPORTS
October 5, 1996 | Associated Press
Defensive end Anthony Smith reported to the Oakland Raiders, nearly a week after announcing he was leaving the team. Smith was put on reserve and remained suspended without pay, the Raiders said Friday. He would not travel with the team for Sunday's game against the New York Jets. A spokesman for Smith announced last week that Smith would no longer play for the Raiders. He left the team last Thursday for his home in Los Angeles.
SPORTS
September 29, 1996 | Associated Press
Defensive end Anthony Smith has left the Oakland Raiders, his attorney said Saturday. "[Smith] has made a decision not to play for the Oakland Raiders," attorney Zachary Jones said in a telephone interview from Washington, D.C. The Raiders confirmed that Smith was not with the team in Chicago on Saturday night and would not play today against the Bears. Jones said he informed Raider senior assistant Bruce Allen of Smith's decision earlier Saturday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1996
Oakland Raider and animal activist Anthony Smith on Tuesday showed two assemblies of Venice schoolchildren his soft and sensitive side and told them to stay in school, shun drugs and mind their parents. In turn, the children showed their hearts and donated $158 and a truck full of supplies to the Wildlife Waystation. The Westminster Avenue School has been collecting for the nonprofit refuge, a haven for wild and exotic animals.
SPORTS
September 29, 1996 | Associated Press
Defensive end Anthony Smith has left the Oakland Raiders, his attorney said Saturday. "[Smith] has made a decision not to play for the Oakland Raiders," attorney Zachary Jones said in a telephone interview from Washington, D.C. The Raiders confirmed that Smith was not with the team in Chicago on Saturday night and would not play today against the Bears. Jones said he informed Raider senior assistant Bruce Allen of Smith's decision earlier Saturday.
BOOKS
March 19, 1995 | DICK RORABACK
THE FREE LIFE by Anthony Smith (Pushcart: $28; 319 pp.) "You just inflate this big balloon and off you go"--Rod Anderson. "We'll just play it by ear"--Pam Anderson. "Got to go now"--Malcolm Brighton. "They're sure in a hurry to die, aren't they?"--anonymous film producer, Sept. 20, 1970: The Andersons--she 28, he 32, Americans--and Brighton--32, English--lift off into a beneficent blue sky from a field in Springs, Long Island. Above them, a magnificent, seven-story balloon.
SPORTS
July 23, 1995 | Mike Downey
I already miss Anthony Smith, although he hasn't gone away. Anthony plays football for Oakland now. But he still has his 6,000-square-foot, French chateau-style house here with the Salvador Dali surrealist art on the walls. He has his black-bottom swimming pool with the panoramic view. He has a new position with the Raiders, who have moved him from defensive end to tackle. And now, he has Denise.
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