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BUSINESS
May 31, 1989
Anti-Cancer Drug Backed: Cetus Corp.'s anti-cancer drug Proleukin interleukin-2 has been recommended for approval by the European Economic Community's committee for proprietary medicinal products. The drug is used in treatment of advanced kidney cancer. The role of the committee, which meets in Brussels on a regular basis, is to act as a centralized body for review of applications for approval of biotech and high-tech drugs and to issue an opinion regarding drug approval. The company said it also applied in November for marketing approval of Proleukin with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
February 14, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Some components of green tea may counteract the beneficial effects of a widely used anti-cancer agent called Velcade, also known as bortezomib. Dr. Axel Schonthal of the USC Keck School of Medicine and colleagues evaluated the impact of green tea compounds on the efficacy of bortezomib against multiple myeloma, a blood cancer, and glioblastoma, a malignant brain tumor. Bortezomib fights cancer by inducing tumor cell death. Schonthal and colleagues found that some of the green tea polyphenols and other components prevented bortezomib from killing tumor cells.
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OPINION
May 24, 1992
Let's hope that those that ridicule environmentalists as "tree huggers" will read your report about taxol, derived from bark of yew tree, and described as "the most promising anti-cancer drug in two decades." ROBERT S. GREENBERG, Granada Hills
NATIONAL
May 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Rick Perry said in Austin that he won't veto a bill that blocks state officials from following his order that sixth-grade girls be vaccinated against a virus that causes cervical cancer. The Republican governor accused state legislators of politicizing the debate over his February executive order that required vaccinations against the human papillomavirus vaccine for girls starting in September 2008.
BOOKS
October 25, 1992 | Lois Wingerson, Wingerson, author of "Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Project and the Future of Medicine" (New American Library), writes often on medicine and molecular biology
Twenty years ago, in a cancer-research lab, I got to know a remarkable mouse. She had conquered so many massive tumors that we called her "Old Brinksmanship." Brinksmanship was an inbred BALB/c house mouse, the star of our experiment in tumor immunology. Our theory was that a prior "insult," an injection of cells from a mouse of a different strain, would somehow get a BALB/c mouse's immune system hopped up enough to attack and conquer cancer cells injected a few days later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1989 | From staff and wire reports
California researchers have identified a new genetic mechanism by which cancer can occur. Dr. Ronald M. Evans and his colleagues at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla reported last week in Nature that they had discovered a gene that is able to override the protective effects of anti-cancer genes called anti-oncogenes. Researchers had previously believed that cancer could occur only when the anti-oncogenes were absent, such as when they are not inherited properly or are destroyed by carcinogenic chemicals or radiation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1989
Fats found in grilled hamburger and processed cheese may act as anti-cancer agents in mice, a researcher said. But he cautioned that the finding is not a signal to "chow down" on cheeseburgers. The findings revealed last week concur with some earlier reports but fly in the face of other recent studies at the UC Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, where scientists experimenting with rats found that substances produced by cooking hamburger cause cancer. Michael Pariza, a food microbiologist at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, and his colleagues found that a fatty acid known as conjugated linoleic acid, or CLA, in grilled hamburger and processed cheeses tended to inhibit cancer development in mice.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Gov. Rick Perry said in Austin that he won't veto a bill that blocks state officials from following his order that sixth-grade girls be vaccinated against a virus that causes cervical cancer. The Republican governor accused state legislators of politicizing the debate over his February executive order that required vaccinations against the human papillomavirus vaccine for girls starting in September 2008.
OPINION
October 15, 2002
I understand the anger and frustration felt by Peggy Orenstein (Commentary, Oct. 9) at the fact that breast cancer continues to kill women (and men), but I disagree with some of the points she makes. The death rate from breast cancer has been decreasing at a rate of 2.2% per year since 1991. As an oncologist who treats breast cancer patients and a longtime volunteer for the American Cancer Society, I am convinced that the decreasing breast cancer death rate is the result of increased breast cancer awareness and increased funding for research.
NEWS
February 11, 1994 | Reuters
San Diego researchers reported Thursday that they had achieved complete chemical synthesis of taxol, a promising anti-cancer drug made from the yew tree. The research by the team of scientists from Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla will be published in the Feb. 17 issue of the magazine Nature. Taxol was originally isolated from the Pacific yew tree. More recently it has also been made from the European yew.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Texas lawmakers rejected Gov. Rick Perry's anti-cancer vaccine order Wednesday, sending him a bill that blocks state officials from requiring the shots for at least four years. Perry has said he is disappointed but has not indicated whether he will veto the bill. He has 10 days to sign or veto it, or the proposal will become law without his signature. Lawmakers can override a veto with a two-thirds vote. The legislation passed by well over that margin in both chambers. Republican Rep.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2006 | John Balzar, Times Staff Writer
You might never hear of Bill Fenical again. In the years ahead, though, you could owe him some of your good health. Perhaps your life. Fenical probably won't join the ranks of those Communications Age nobles who transform convenience gadgetry and technological gewgaws into inconceivable wealth. Yet this chemist is hot on the trail of discoveries far more tantalizing. William -- "call me Bill" -- Fenical, PhD, is out to cure cancer. Maybe prevent cancer.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
An anti-cancer drug that suppresses the immune system is the first drug that has been shown to alleviate the most devastating effects of scleroderma, a disease of the connective tissues and lungs. Patients taking cyclophosphamide experienced significant improvement in lung function and a reduction in breathlessness. They also reported feeling healthier and more energetic, Dr. Donald P. Tashkin of UCLA told a San Diego meeting of the American Thoracic Society on Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2004 | Charles Ornstein and Tracy Weber, Times Staff Writers
William Watson doesn't have cancer. But for at least four days last week, nurses at Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center gave the 46-year-old man a potent anti-cancer drug before they realized the medication was intended for another patient. When the error was discovered, Watson said, a nursing supervisor told him: "I want you to sign this paper saying that this had happened, but it had no effect on you."
OPINION
October 15, 2002
I understand the anger and frustration felt by Peggy Orenstein (Commentary, Oct. 9) at the fact that breast cancer continues to kill women (and men), but I disagree with some of the points she makes. The death rate from breast cancer has been decreasing at a rate of 2.2% per year since 1991. As an oncologist who treats breast cancer patients and a longtime volunteer for the American Cancer Society, I am convinced that the decreasing breast cancer death rate is the result of increased breast cancer awareness and increased funding for research.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2000 | SYLVIA PAGAN WESTPHAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The run-up in biotechnology stocks during the first three months this year saved tiny Techniclone Corp. from the brink of oblivion. Shares that were trading at 25 cents in December hit $16.63 during trading in March. But as Techniclone stock has since plummeted--along with a general drop in biotech stocks--the future is a bit more complicated for the Tustin developer of cancer treatments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An anti-cancer gene that helps guard against lung and breast cancer may perform its lifesaving function by shutting down a gene that helps stimulate cell growth, researchers said last week. Researchers have suspected that an anti-cancer gene, called the retinoblastoma gene, might act by shutting off one or more cell-growth genes. But they didn't know which ones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1997 | Associated Press
Scientists say they have taken a leap toward figuring out how a cancer-suppressing gene makes dangerous cells die. The work might help researchers understand how radiation therapy and some chemotherapy kill cancers. The gene is called p53. When it turns on, it can block a cell's attempt to reproduce itself or make it commit suicide. In these ways, it can keep a cell with damaged DNA from creating a cancerous tumor.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
Researchers say that they have found the active ingredient of the cancer-fighting drug Taxol in hazelnuts, a discovery that could lead to alternatives to current production methods. "This is potentially good news for cancer patients," said Angela M. Hoffman, a member of the research team at the University of Portland in Oregon, who presented the study Wednesday at the national meeting of the American Chemical Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1998 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a strange sight to witness: With her deep-red hair and her vivid ruby lips, Susan Trear was dancing in a wooden barrel filled with red seedless grapes to the tunes of Italian folk songs. Though the scene was indeed reminiscent of an "I Love Lucy" episode, Sunday's grape-stomping celebration in Irvine was for a deadly serious cause.
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