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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1992 | CATHERINE O'BRIEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On 11 1/2 acres of western Oregon soil, at intervals of six inches, hope has been planted. Hope takes the form of 2 million eight-inch cuttings from yew trees. By mid-decade, these trees are to be marshaled in the fight against cancer. They contain taxol--the most promising cancer drug discovered in the last 10 years, according to the National Cancer Institute. "Nobody's ever grown yew this way to extract taxol. It's a gigantic experiment," said Mark E.
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BOOKS
October 25, 1992 | Lois Wingerson, Wingerson, author of "Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Project and the Future of Medicine" (New American Library), writes often on medicine and molecular biology
Twenty years ago, in a cancer-research lab, I got to know a remarkable mouse. She had conquered so many massive tumors that we called her "Old Brinksmanship." Brinksmanship was an inbred BALB/c house mouse, the star of our experiment in tumor immunology. Our theory was that a prior "insult," an injection of cells from a mouse of a different strain, would somehow get a BALB/c mouse's immune system hopped up enough to attack and conquer cancer cells injected a few days later.
OPINION
May 24, 1992
Let's hope that those that ridicule environmentalists as "tree huggers" will read your report about taxol, derived from bark of yew tree, and described as "the most promising anti-cancer drug in two decades." ROBERT S. GREENBERG, Granada Hills
NEWS
May 22, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of La Jolla scientists says it has designed and synthesized a new class of anti-cancer compounds that appear more potent than other chemotherapies, according to a study released today. The molecules, called synthetic enediynes, demonstrated a remarkable ability in laboratory experiments to target and destroy cancer cells without harming healthy cells, said K.C. Nicolaou, the lead author of the study and chairman of the chemistry department at the Scripps Research Institute.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK and THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITERS
On the night in question, the Florida State University building that houses Robert Holton's lab was locked. But somehow a desperate man who had driven hundreds of miles managed to slip inside. Despite the hour, nearly midnight, the bespectacled chemist was at work. When Holton responded to the rapid pounding on his office door, he faced a youngish-looking stranger, talking fast and loud: His mother had cancer. He needed taxol for her, needed it right away.
OPINION
April 12, 1992
Three scientific marvels all tightly wrapped around a scientific warning made appearances last week at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in San Francisco. The marvels involve a compound that can be derived from the bark of the Pacific yew, a tree that grows in the Pacific Northwest. The substance provides the most promising cancer drug of recent years, known in the United States as taxol.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A simple screening test has led to the isolation of a powerful anti-cancer drug and a safe, natural pesticide from the paw paw tree, sometimes called the "Indiana banana," a researcher said. The drug, which has so far been tested only in animals, is a million times as potent as the widely used cancer drug Adriamycin, said Jerry L. McLaughlin of Purdue University.
NEWS
October 24, 1990 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Loma Linda University Medical Center on Tuesday inaugurated the world's first hospital-based cancer treatment facility that uses a beam of protons to irradiate tumors. Declaring that their $45-million center marks a "milestone" in cancer treatment, Loma Linda officials said proton therapy could ultimately be effective for many of the 1 million new patients diagnosed with cancer in the United States each year.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the highly publicized tug-of-war over logging the ancient forests of the Pacific Northwest has been focused on the northern spotted owl, another controversy has slowly been brewing over the same issue--this one with a medical twist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | Compiled from Times staff and wire reports
An anti-cancer gene that helps guard against lung and breast cancer may perform its lifesaving function by shutting down a gene that helps stimulate cell growth, researchers said last week. Researchers have suspected that an anti-cancer gene, called the retinoblastoma gene, might act by shutting off one or more cell-growth genes. But they didn't know which ones.
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