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Anti Gang Programs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2009 | Maeve Reston
A social worker who grew up in New York after emigrating from Cuba as a child was picked Tuesday by Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to run the city's anti-gang programs. Villaraigosa praised Guillermo Cespedes as the innovative architect of his 2-year-old Summer Night Lights program, aimed at reducing violence by keeping the lights on until midnight at parks in some of the city's most crime-ridden areas. In the first year, the mayor said, Cespedes oversaw "every painstaking detail" at eight parks.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2009 | Maeve Reston
A social worker who grew up in New York after emigrating from Cuba as a child was picked Tuesday by Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa to run the city's anti-gang programs. Villaraigosa praised Guillermo Cespedes as the innovative architect of his 2-year-old Summer Night Lights program, aimed at reducing violence by keeping the lights on until midnight at parks in some of the city's most crime-ridden areas. In the first year, the mayor said, Cespedes oversaw "every painstaking detail" at eight parks.
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NEWS
March 15, 1990
A network of social service agencies will begin working together in April to try to keep youths out of street gangs. Venice, Mar Vista and Crenshaw are targeted by the program, which was recently approved by the Los Angeles City Council. The program grew out of 1988 legislation creating a "Youth At Risk" advocate to coordinate the city's diverse youth assistance and anti-gang programs, said City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2009 | Rich Connell
Los Angeles City Atty.-elect Carmen Trutanich announced Monday he had recruited teams of volunteer lawyers, homeowners, educators and others to conduct a top-to-bottom review of the sprawling government law office he takes over July 1. The working groups will develop "an action plan to restructure and reform the office of the city attorney to better serve the people," Trutanich said in a statement. Among other topics, the examination will cover anti-gang programs, public integrity enforcement, how the office is administered and a new unit of professional investigators that Trutanich wants to create.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992 | AMY PYLE
United Community Action Network received a $40,000 grant from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday for a gang diversion and parenting program in the Antelope Valley. The nonprofit network has run a variety of anti-gang programs out of its Palmdale office since 1990, including a 24-hour tip and help line, seminars and youth counseling. The grant will be supplemented by $55,000 in state funding to pay for one year of the program's operating costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1998
The state attorney general's office will give $196,000 to fund the city's anti-gang efforts, officials said. The funds, which will be spread over two years, will go to the Long Beach Community Partnership, which heads the city's Gang Intervention and Prevention Network. The money will be divided among the network's members, which include the YMCA, the Los Angeles County probation office, the Long Beach Police Department and the city Parks, Recreation and Marine's Gang Prevention Unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa made a splash when he announced plans last week for ending L.A. Bridges, an anti-gang initiative under fire since the Riordan administration for failing to demonstrate clear results. But in dropping the L.A. Bridges programs and shifting the money to his appointed "gang czar," Villaraigosa put off yet again answering one key question: Are these programs, which last year received $13.2 million, successful in quelling violence and keeping kids out of gangs?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1996 | KENNETH CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most programs aimed at reducing gang violence are ineffective or actually worsen the problem, a USC sociologist told a city committee Thursday. "The overwhelming evidence is that [anti-gang programs] are at best ineffective at achieving behavioral change," Malcolm Klein, a professor of sociology, said before the City Council's ad hoc committee on gang violence and youth justice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1993 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raul Alvarado's field trip to the horror show was a breeze--until he saw a fellow member of his gang lying naked and dead on a gurney, awaiting the knife. Stunned into silence, he was led down the hall at the Los Angeles County coroner's office, where he watched as much of another gangbanger's autopsy as he could take. For a long time, Alvarado would not talk. It took him most of the morning to get over the experience.
NEWS
August 5, 1992 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sharp blow to the fledgling gang-prevention program known as Hope in Youth, Mayor Tom Bradley on Tuesday fired off a strongly worded letter to the campaign's leader, Cardinal Roger M. Mahony, saying the city will not contribute the requested $2.5 million to a project with no track record--especially when other deserving anti-gang programs are struggling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2009 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday approved a multiagency pilot program to combat gang activity in four targeted communities -- Duarte-Monrovia, Florence-Firestone, Harbor Gateway and Pacoima. County Chief Executive Officer William T. Fujioka and Sheriff Lee Baca said the plan focuses on improving coordination of services, such as law enforcement, probation and social services, for at-risk youth in those areas. If the pilot program succeeds, it could be expanded countywide.
OPINION
December 13, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
Father Gregory Boyle, the Jesuit priest who has heroically labored for more than 20 years on behalf of the young men and women Los Angeles would most like to forget, likes to say that "nothing stops a bullet like a job." In fact, that's the slogan of Homeboy Industries, the phenomenally successful gang intervention program he created.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2008 | David Zahniser, Zahniser is a Times staff writer.
The city of Los Angeles ended 2006 with the high-profile killings of two children: a 9-year-old girl in Angeleno Heights and a 14-year-old girl in Harbor Gateway who, police say, was targeted in part because of her race. In the wake of those tragedies, the city's elected officials began work on a tax measure that would raise $30 million for anti-gang initiatives, including after-school programs and city-run recreation activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2008 | David Zahniser
Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton and L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca said Tuesday that they supported a city ballot measure that would raise taxes to pay for anti-gang programs. The campaign for Proposition A, a $30-million tax hike on the Nov. 4 ballot, said that it also has secured the support of Los Angeles Fire Chief Douglas Barry and businessman and former basketball star Earvin "Magic" Johnson. Proposition A would charge property owners an additional $36 per year, with the proceeds paying for after-school programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2008 | Phil Willon, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa on Monday credited a new summertime anti-gang program, which included special community events and extended nighttime hours at eight city parks, with a measurable drop in crime in some of the city's most violent neighborhoods. Between the Fourth of July and Labor Day, the Summer Night Lights program offered special movie nights and other youth- and family-oriented events until midnight four nights a week, during peak time for gang activity and other juvenile-related crime.
OPINION
July 9, 2008
The L.A. Bridges anti-gang program is being phased out, and good riddance. A great idea -- hiring experts to divert Los Angeles kids from gang life and to intervene in gang conflicts before they became violent -- became a bad idea, in large part because of political opportunism. Despite a lack of measurable results, City Council members kept renewing the program in exchange for their cut. Two cuts, actually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2008 | David Zahniser
Los Angeles Police Chief William J. Bratton and L.A. County Sheriff Lee Baca said Tuesday that they supported a city ballot measure that would raise taxes to pay for anti-gang programs. The campaign for Proposition A, a $30-million tax hike on the Nov. 4 ballot, said that it also has secured the support of Los Angeles Fire Chief Douglas Barry and businessman and former basketball star Earvin "Magic" Johnson. Proposition A would charge property owners an additional $36 per year, with the proceeds paying for after-school programs.
OPINION
February 16, 1997
Re "Treating L.A.'s Gang Problem: We Need 'Root' Doctors," Opinion, Feb. 9: Bravo Luis Rodriguez! Amen to your words, "Any society that does not take care of the material, spiritual and educational needs of its children--in fact the whole community . . . has failed." Who has failed? How about those elected officials? What with all that rhetoric, grandstanding and embarrassment to the pueblo of Los Angeles, what have they failed to do? Just look at the neighborhood and reflect on all the potential that is yet to be unleashed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2008 | David Zahniser, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa made a splash when he announced plans last week for ending L.A. Bridges, an anti-gang initiative under fire since the Riordan administration for failing to demonstrate clear results. But in dropping the L.A. Bridges programs and shifting the money to his appointed "gang czar," Villaraigosa put off yet again answering one key question: Are these programs, which last year received $13.2 million, successful in quelling violence and keeping kids out of gangs?
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