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NATIONAL
July 25, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - In a gilded but often lonely life, Cordelia Scaife May, heiress to one of America's most storied fortunes, had a few cherished passions. Protecting birds was one. Keeping immigrants out was another. An ardent environmentalist more comfortable with books and birds than with high-society galas, May believed nature was under siege from runaway population growth. Before her death in 2005, she devoted much of her wealth to rolling back the tide - backing birth control and curbing immigration, both legal and illegal.
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WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Henry Chu
BERLIN - The last time she checked, Katya Tasheva had the normal number of limbs and eyes. So she feels a nasty shock of non-recognition, she says, when German news reports warn of a coming invasion of people like her - Bulgarians - as if they were aliens from space. "It's all of a sudden like we're these three-eyed, five-legged people who are all going to steal stuff," said Tasheva, 27, a singer who has lived in Berlin for nine years. "Normally when I listen to these comments, I just laugh and switch the channel or turn the page….
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OPINION
July 28, 2013
Re "Rich bird-lover's anti-immigration legacy has wings," July 25 As an immigrant and an environmentalist, I'm appalled by the late heiress Cordelia Scaife May's legacy of funding anti-immigration groups. May's belief that immigration fuels population growth and harms the environment is racist and outdated. A 2010 University of Pennsylvania study showed that Mexican immigrant fertility rates rapidly decline in subsequent generations, debunking previous reports of continued high population growth among Latinos.
OPINION
July 28, 2013
Re "Rich bird-lover's anti-immigration legacy has wings," July 25 As an immigrant and an environmentalist, I'm appalled by the late heiress Cordelia Scaife May's legacy of funding anti-immigration groups. May's belief that immigration fuels population growth and harms the environment is racist and outdated. A 2010 University of Pennsylvania study showed that Mexican immigrant fertility rates rapidly decline in subsequent generations, debunking previous reports of continued high population growth among Latinos.
OPINION
June 13, 2008
Re "Over the line," editorial, June 11 How can The Times just not understand facts? The editorial states, "Should the government cede so much ground to an anti-immigration mob that shows no signs of being appeasable?" The proper term is "anti-illegal" immigration. The word "illegal" should mean a lot. I do not know one person who is against legal immigration, but most people I know are against illegal immigration. The Times' continual deletion of the word "illegal" is very well calculated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1995
Many complaints are expressed regarding illegal immigrants attending the California state universities. Most of these illegal immigrants are taxpaying (residents) of the State of California. They also contribute to the Social Security fund but will never receive these benefits, since this is generally done with an illegal Social Security number. One never hears complaints about out-of-state students, many of whom come here, establish bogus residency, and then benefit from the lower tuition.
OPINION
April 20, 2008
Re "They've served the U.S. -- now they're citizens," April 15 It seems today that you must be either anti-American or anti-immigration. The article that explains how 22 U.S. immigrants who have chosen to fight for this country have gained citizenship shows that our divisions over who has a right into this country and who does not are misinformed, to say the least. I am a naturally born U.S. citizen and have been granted rights that others, who truly value the freedoms the United States can provide, should enjoy.
OPINION
January 16, 2008
Re "San Diego Minutemen adopt a road," Jan. 12 That was a nice piece about the Minutemen adopting a highway, but I think you gave credit to the wrong group. The Campo Minutemen adopted Buckman Springs Highway in Campo, Calif., more than a year ago, and there was no controversy or complaints. The group has at least one man cleaning up literally every day, and every few weeks there is a crew out on a Saturday. They are doing a great job. Indy Britton Campo, Calif. The Minutemen may wish to be simply characterized as a community activist group, but it is a loose network of anti-immigration groups whose primary goal is to stop an alleged invasion of the United States by immigrants from Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1996
The commentary by Bert Corona and Nativo Vigil Lopez ("Beating Case Spotlights Larger Issues," April 14) sounds like a hostile threat to me. In their biased, one-sided, blind, zealous, spiteful tirade, they express their "repugnance" and "disgust" at the "inhumane police acts of terror." They claim those acts of terror are very common now along the U.S.-Mexican border. They also blame politicians for creating the hostile anti-immigrant climate. They want a lot of other things like more money for citizenship assistance, less border patrol enforcement and no immigration reform.
OPINION
February 24, 2002 | JONAH GOLDBERG
I first met Pat Buchanan almost 33 years ago, though I can't say I remember him--I was 8 days old. My dad's great friend, Victor Lasky, the late, great conservative muckraker, brought Buchanan to attend my bris (the Jewish celebration that brilliantly marries ritual circumcision and smoked fish on a bagel). Lasky introduced the future three-time presidential candidate to my Dad: "This is Pat Buchanan, he's a terrific redbaiter." Since my family's apartment on the Upper West Side of Manhattan was, for political conservatives, what the catacombs were for Christians in ancient Rome--sanctuary from the pagan authorities--it was probably the only place north of Lincoln Center that someone could be called a "terrific redbaiter" and it would be both offered and received as a high compliment.
NATIONAL
July 25, 2013 | By Joseph Tanfani
WASHINGTON - In a gilded but often lonely life, Cordelia Scaife May, heiress to one of America's most storied fortunes, had a few cherished passions. Protecting birds was one. Keeping immigrants out was another. An ardent environmentalist more comfortable with books and birds than with high-society galas, May believed nature was under siege from runaway population growth. Before her death in 2005, she devoted much of her wealth to rolling back the tide - backing birth control and curbing immigration, both legal and illegal.
NEWS
July 24, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
A federal appeals court Monday struck down a controversial ordinance that sought to ban landlords in the Texas community of Farmers Branch from renting to immigrants who are illegally in the country . The 2008 ordinance, which never took effect, required renters to obtain a city license verifying they were in the country legally, and made it a crime for a landlord to rent to anyone without a license. The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals ruling is hardly surprising, given that Farmers Branch officials argued that the law wasn't trying to regulate immigration; rather, they said, it was merely an attempt to regulate housing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy and Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - California legislative leaders and 10 public employee unions announced opposition Wednesday to any sale of the Los Angeles Times and other Tribune Co. newspapers to a pair of wealthy brothers who fund conservative causes. In a letter dated Tuesday to Bruce Karsh, president of Oaktree Capital Management, the largest shareholder in Tribune Co., and chairman of its board of directors, the unions said David and Charles Koch are "anti-labor, anti-environment, anti-public education and anti-immigrant.
NEWS
June 29, 2012 | By Susan Brenneman
Tamar Jacoby, in her June 26 Op-Ed  in response to the Supreme Court's decision announced June 25 on Arizona's SB 1070 law, used the term "anti-immigrant" to summarize those who favor "show your papers" rules, have blocked comprehensive immigration reform and object to creating any kind of path to citizenship for people in the U.S. without papers. Many commenters seized on the usage to criticize her opinion and analysis, which focused on the signs that the "antis" are on the wane.
OPINION
April 24, 2012 | By Pratheepan Gulasekaram and Karthick Ramakrishnan
The Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday on the constitutionality of Arizona's 2010 immigration enforcement law. If upheld, SB 1070 would require local police in most circumstances to determine the immigration status of anyone they stop based only on a reasonable suspicion that the person is unlawfully in this country. It would also compel residents to carry their immigration papers at all times and create state immigration crimes distinct from what is covered by federal law. A few other states, such as Alabama and Georgia, and some cities have passed similar laws, and many more may consider such laws if the Supreme Court finds Arizona's law to be constitutional.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2012 | By Richard Fausset
ATLANTA -- Mississippi's controversial illegal immigration crackdown bill died in a state Senate committee Tuesday, bucking a trend in Deep South states for more-stringent enforcement efforts. Reportedly still afoot, however, are other legislative maneuvers to get the core elements of the bill onto the desk of recently elected Gov. Phil Bryant, a strong supporter of an Arizona-style immigration law. Pro-immigrant groups say they are not ready to declare victory until the legislative session ends next month.
OPINION
April 24, 2012 | By Pratheepan Gulasekaram and Karthick Ramakrishnan
The Supreme Court hears oral arguments Wednesday on the constitutionality of Arizona's 2010 immigration enforcement law. If upheld, SB 1070 would require local police in most circumstances to determine the immigration status of anyone they stop based only on a reasonable suspicion that the person is unlawfully in this country. It would also compel residents to carry their immigration papers at all times and create state immigration crimes distinct from what is covered by federal law. A few other states, such as Alabama and Georgia, and some cities have passed similar laws, and many more may consider such laws if the Supreme Court finds Arizona's law to be constitutional.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Farmers Branch City Council unanimously approved tough new anti-immigration measures, including one that makes English the city's official language. In a series of 6-0 votes, the council also approved fines for landlords who rent to illegal immigrants, and decided to allow local authorities to screen suspects in police custody to determine whether they are in the country illegally.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2011 | Richard Fausset
Rodney Hunt, fresh off work in a starched, buttoned-down shirt, joined the crowd that was streaming into a meeting of the Central Mississippi Tea Party. It was just after the state primaries, and Hunt, 65, a reserved man by nature, had emerged as something of a Mississippi kingmaker. Hunt's organization, the Mississippi Federation for Immigration Reform and Enforcement, or MFIRE, had endorsed Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant, who had just crushed his opponent in the GOP primary and appeared destined to become governor, partly because he was promising voters he'd push for a tough anti-illegal-immigration law -- the group's signature issue.
OPINION
September 30, 2011
This week Alabama became the first of several states that have passed draconian anti-immigrant laws to successfully defend key provisions of its law in court. U.S. District Judge Sharon Lovelace Blackburn found that parts of Alabama's controversial law didn't conflict with the federal government's authority to regulate immigration. That means that, effective immediately, state and local police must arrest and detain anyone they suspect of being in the country illegally. Schools are required to determine the immigration status of students and provide it to district officials.
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