Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAnti Piracy
IN THE NEWS

Anti Piracy

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Christopher J. Dodd, a former Democratic senator from Connecticut and now Hollywood's point person in Washington, had some rare kind words for Republicans. Dodd, chairman and chief executive of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood's chief lobbying group, praised the GOP's statements on intellectual property and Internet freedom during its convention in Tampa, Fla. "The Republican Party platform language strikes a very smart balance: it emphasizes the importance of us doing more as a nation to protect our intellectual property from online theft while underscoring the critical importance of protecting Internet freedom," Dodd said in a statement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
First there was the Boy Scouts' "Respect Copyrights" activity patch, backed by the Motion Picture Assn. of America. Then there was "Crime-Fighting Canines," a weekly anti-piracy comic strip series for children in which two black Labrador retrievers named Lucky and Flo sniffed out bootleg DVDs. The series was part of a school education campaign led by the MPAA. Now that group, along with the Recording Industry Assn. of America and the nation's main Internet service providers, is quietly backing another controversial push to educate schoolchildren about the evils of piracy.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
November 17, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The fight between Hollywood and Silicon Valley over proposed anti-piracy legislation is heating up on Capitol Hill. At a congressional hearing Wednesday, Michael O'Leary, senior executive vice president for the Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood's chief lobbying arm, urged lawmakers to move swiftly to pass a bill that would make it easier to shut down rogue websites that traffic in pirated movies and TV shows. Such websites pose a threat to the 95,000 small businesses across the country involved in the production and distribution of movies and television and cost the industry billions of dollars each year, O'Leary testified.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
In a victory for Hollywood's anti-piracy efforts, the trade group representing the major studios has won a legal fight against Hotfile, one of the largest file sharing sites on the Internet. The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida on Wednesday  found Hotfile liable for copyright infringement and rejected Hotfile's defense under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The court further held that Hotfile's principal, Anton Titov, was personally liable for Hotfile's infringement as well.  This case marked the first time that a U.S. court has ruled on whether so-called cyberlockers like Hotfile can be held liable for their infringing business practices.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
In a victory for Hollywood's anti-piracy efforts, the trade group representing the major studios has won a legal fight against Hotfile, one of the largest file sharing sites on the Internet. The U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida on Wednesday  found Hotfile liable for copyright infringement and rejected Hotfile's defense under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. The court further held that Hotfile's principal, Anton Titov, was personally liable for Hotfile's infringement as well.  This case marked the first time that a U.S. court has ruled on whether so-called cyberlockers like Hotfile can be held liable for their infringing business practices.
NATIONAL
January 14, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration signaled Saturday it does not support aspects of pending anti-piracy legislation, a setback for the Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood's chief lobbying arm. The measures - which have deeply divided the entertainment and technology industries - would give the Justice Department more tools to shut down foreign websites involved in theft of movies and TV shows. Major Hollywood studios and unions have been mounting a campaign in support of the bills to combat online piracy, which costs the industry billions annually.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2012 | By Andrea Chang and Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
What would the world be like without the Internet? Fire up your browser and see what you can't do. In the first strike of its kind, hundreds of popular sites such as Wikipedia, Reddit and Boing Boing were scheduled to temporarily shut down Wednesday to protest a pair of anti-piracy bills that they say essentially amount to censorship of the Internet. The prospect of a day without the websites set off a frenzy in the hours leading up to the strike, which was slated to begin Tuesday night, with parents urging their children to do their homework early and tech-savvy users posting instructions for how to access cached Wikipedia pages during the blackout.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
  Chinese Internet users are applauding the U.S. tech industry's Web "strike" this week to protest federal anti-piracy bills that would give Uncle Sam greater control of cyberspace. As websites including Wikipedia shut down and millions of Americans complained to lawmakers about the potential for government censorship, Chinese netizens spoke admiringly of the public rebellion. Such a display in China would be nearly impossible right now, given Beijing's tight grip on citizens' online activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
The industry's chief lobbying group wants to do a better job of telling Hollywood's story. The Motion Picture Assn. of America is launching a new website today called The Credits that provides feature stories, graphics and facts and figures intended to offer more insight into the people and businesses that make the film and television industry run. "I don't think the industry has done a very good job of telling its story," said Chris Dodd, chairman...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1991
Music-industry events such as Live Aid, Farm Aid, the Policeman's Ball in Britain, Christmas Around the World and numerous other fund-raisers have assisted the disadvantaged and needy. The National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences is made up of individuals involved in the making of music from inception to sales. The organization rewards musicians with awards voted by their peers for artistic ability and craftsmanship. No Grammy is based on sales. NARAS also is active with the Recording Industry Assn.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Jon Healey
This week the entertainment industry finally is getting a version of something it has been craving since the original Napster transformed online piracy into a mass-market phenomenon: a new Copyright Alert System that turns Internet service providers into anti-piracy enforcers. It's not as powerful as the major record companies and Hollywood studios have proposed, and it ignores many sources of bootlegged music and movie files online. But it's a start. And if the industry's assumptions are correct, it could make a dent in the problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Chris Dodd, Hollywood's chief lobbyist, extended an olive branch to Silicon Valley. Eager to put to rest a bruising battle with Google and other tech companies over ill-fated anti-piracy bills this year, Dodd stressed common ground between California's two signature  industries in a speech Tuesday at the Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco. "What I don't want to do is relive the SOPA debate -- and I hope you don't either," Dodd said, alluding to the Stop Online Piracy Act that sparked an unprecedented online protest led by Google, Wikipedia and other tech giants.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
The industry's chief lobbying group wants to do a better job of telling Hollywood's story. The Motion Picture Assn. of America is launching a new website today called The Credits that provides feature stories, graphics and facts and figures intended to offer more insight into the people and businesses that make the film and television industry run. "I don't think the industry has done a very good job of telling its story," said Chris Dodd, chairman...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Christopher J. Dodd, a former Democratic senator from Connecticut and now Hollywood's point person in Washington, had some rare kind words for Republicans. Dodd, chairman and chief executive of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, Hollywood's chief lobbying group, praised the GOP's statements on intellectual property and Internet freedom during its convention in Tampa, Fla. "The Republican Party platform language strikes a very smart balance: it emphasizes the importance of us doing more as a nation to protect our intellectual property from online theft while underscoring the critical importance of protecting Internet freedom," Dodd said in a statement.
OPINION
February 25, 2012 | Patt Morrison
Hollywood loves comeback stories. Will SOPA/PIPA be one of them? The anti-piracy bills that were working their way through Congress with Hollywood's blessing got tanked by a massive online campaign - petitions, website blackouts, even T-shirts. From 1981 until 2010, Christopher J. Dodd was a Democratic senator from Connecticut. A year later, as head of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, he was dealing with SOPA/PIPA fallout. Showing up at the Oscars - which he will do - is just the tip of the MPAA job. Dodd has arranged matinees for veterans at MPAA's theater in D.C., worked on film trade matters, and postelection, he'll try out an anti-piracy law sequel.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2012 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
After a week in which their anti-piracy legislation got derailed by the full force of the Internet lobby, the mood in Hollywood was one of anger, frustration and a growing resignation that the entertainment industry will be forced to accept a much weaker law than originally envisioned. A full-on counterattack by a tech industry opposed to the toughest elements in the congressional bills, including a well-publicized Wednesday shutdown by key Internet sites, halted the legislation.
WORLD
January 5, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
A French warship captured 19 Somali pirates when it came to the rescue of two cargo ships threatened in the Gulf of Aden, the office of President Nicolas Sarkozy said. The Jean de Vienne was patrolling as part of a European Union anti-piracy force when it came to aid a Croatian cargo vessel and a Panamanian ship. The 19 pirates were handed over to Somali authorities. The incident came three days after another French vessel captured eight Somali pirates who had attacked a Panamanian- registered vessel.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
  Chinese Internet users are applauding the U.S. tech industry's Web "strike" this week to protest federal anti-piracy bills that would give Uncle Sam greater control of cyberspace. As websites including Wikipedia shut down and millions of Americans complained to lawmakers about the potential for government censorship, Chinese netizens spoke admiringly of the public rebellion. Such a display in China would be nearly impossible right now, given Beijing's tight grip on citizens' online activities.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2012 | By David Pierson
Watching from China, where web censorship is practically a national hallmark, some can't help but smirk and crack jokes about the controversy raging over Internet freedom in the U.S. “Now the U.S. government is copying us and starting to build their own firewall,” wrote one micro-blogger, relating China's chief censorship tool to the U.S. plan to block sites that trade in pirated material. The Relevant Organs , an anonymous Twitter account (presumably) pretending to be the voice of the Chinese communist leadership, quipped: “Don't understand the hoopla over Wikipedia blackout in the U.S. today.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|