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WORLD
April 15, 2010 | By Julian E. Barnes
The Pentagon has increased its use of the military's most elite special operations teams in Afghanistan, more than doubling the number of the highly trained teams assigned to hunt down Taliban leaders, according to senior officials. The secretive buildup reflects the view of the Obama administration and senior military leaders that the U.S. has only a limited amount of time to degrade the capabilities of the Taliban. U.S. forces are in the midst of an overall increase that will add 30,000 troops this year and plan to begin reducing the force in mid-2011.
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WORLD
February 12, 2014 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Shashank Bengali
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Nine members of an anti-Taliban militia were killed execution-style at a house on the outskirts of this troubled provincial capital, in the latest violence to mar the Pakistani government's effort to open peace talks with outlawed Islamist militants. Police said most of the victims were members of the same family, which had belonged to a local committee that helped law enforcement agencies track and thwart the movements of militant groups in the area. The militias were established in 2008 after a surge in militant activity in Peshawar and other parts of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, with authorities providing guns and ammunition to volunteers who conducted patrols in their areas.
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WORLD
June 19, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The morning raid caught members of the tribal militia by surprise. By the end of the attack on the camp on a patch of desert scrub in eastern Afghanistan, 12 fighters of a group that had dared to take on the Taliban were dead. But their attackers were not Taliban militants. They were fellow Shinwari tribesmen, incensed that the militia had commandeered a swath of their land. The incident this year highlights the pitfalls of establishing militias in Afghanistan, a country marked by tribal rivalries, age-old feuds and warlords.
WORLD
June 30, 2013 | By Zulfiqar Ali and Alex Rodriguez
PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Separate bomb blasts across Pakistan killed at least 36 people Sunday, the latest in a series of extremist attacks to hit the South Asian nation since Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif rose to power this spring. In the northwestern city of Peshawar, militants detonated a car bomb near a security forces convoy, killing at least 15 people. Shafeeullah Khan, a senior police officer in Peshawar, said the attackers planted explosives in a Suzuki compact car and parked it on a busy road.
WORLD
March 28, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
It was a classic photo opportunity: the governor of Kandahar province astride a lumbering farm tractor, plowing under the first green shoots of opium poppies poking their way through the soil. The engine clattered; the cameras clicked away. "Enough?" the governor asked, and clambered down. Just outside the photo frames, truckloads of Afghan police and a convoy of U.S. armored vehicles stood guard over this drug-eradication exercise a half-hour west of Kandahar, the main city of southern Afghanistan.
WORLD
July 9, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez and Zulfiqar Ali, Los Angeles Times
Suicide bomb explosions tore through a busy market Friday in a volatile tribal region of Pakistan, killing more than 65 people in an attack that illustrated the Taliban's potency despite several recent military offensives against the insurgents. The blasts took place in the village of Yakka Ghund outside the offices of a senior administrator for the Mohmand tribal region, police said. At least 112 people were injured. Authorities said one of the bombers was on a motorcycle and the other detonated a Toyota Corolla sedan filled with explosives.
WORLD
September 25, 2009 | Associated Press
A suspected U.S. missile strike killed four people in northwestern Pakistan late Thursday, intelligence officials said. The strike occurred near the town of Mir Ali in the North Waziristan tribal region close to the Afghan border, said two intelligence officials who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to reporters. The border region provides Islamist militants with a haven from which they can stage attacks on foreign forces in Afghanistan.
WORLD
October 25, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
More than 1,000 people shouted anti-Taliban slogans in a protest against the slaying of 26 young men from their community. The demonstration in eastern Laghman province was one of the largest anti-Taliban gatherings since the fall of the hard-line Islamist regime following the U.S. invasion in late 2001. A Taliban spokesman said the men were taken from a bus Oct. 16 in Kandahar province and killed because they were members of Afghan security forces. But Afghan officials said the victims were civilians who were on their way to find jobs in neighboring Iran.
OPINION
December 18, 2001
Looking at that picture of the anti-Taliban fighters examining stacks of munitions (front page, Dec. 12), I had to wonder: Who manufactured that ammunition? Who sold that ammunition? Who bought that ammunition? Who delivered that ammunition? As the world's largest exporter of weapons and things warlike, I have to wonder, did any of it say "Made in USA"? Carol Marshall Orange
WORLD
September 10, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
In the country where the Sept. 11 plot was hatched and its Al Qaeda masterminds found shelter, public knowledge of the link between the devastating events of a decade ago and today's war has grown hazy. Nearly half of all Afghans are under the age of 15, too young to have a firsthand recollection of that day, or the U.S.-led invasion that began less than a month later. Among older people, even those grateful that the invasion ended Taliban rule, there is a sense that the conflict has moved far beyond its original impetus.
WORLD
May 18, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A police chief who had stood up repeatedly to the Taliban was shot and killed in a drive-by attack by four insurgents on motorcycles, officials said Saturday. The police chief, Abdul Ghani, was leaving his driveway in his car around 8 p.m. Friday when the attackers rode up on two motorcycles and opened fire, officials said. He was badly wounded in the shooting and died on the way to the hospital, said Abdul Rahman Zhowandai, a spokesman for the governor of Farah province.
WORLD
September 10, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
In the country where the Sept. 11 plot was hatched and its Al Qaeda masterminds found shelter, public knowledge of the link between the devastating events of a decade ago and today's war has grown hazy. Nearly half of all Afghans are under the age of 15, too young to have a firsthand recollection of that day, or the U.S.-led invasion that began less than a month later. Among older people, even those grateful that the invasion ended Taliban rule, there is a sense that the conflict has moved far beyond its original impetus.
WORLD
March 28, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
It was a classic photo opportunity: the governor of Kandahar province astride a lumbering farm tractor, plowing under the first green shoots of opium poppies poking their way through the soil. The engine clattered; the cameras clicked away. "Enough?" the governor asked, and clambered down. Just outside the photo frames, truckloads of Afghan police and a convoy of U.S. armored vehicles stood guard over this drug-eradication exercise a half-hour west of Kandahar, the main city of southern Afghanistan.
WORLD
March 10, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez and Zulfiqar Ali, Los Angeles Times
A suicide bombing killed at least 34 people and injured more than 40 at a funeral held by an anti-Taliban tribal militia Wednesday in northwest Pakistan, prompting militia leaders to angrily rebuke the government for failing to provide enough support for their battle against insurgents. The attack occurred in the village of Adezai, about 15 miles south of the city of Peshawar and just east of the volatile tribal areas where Al Qaeda and Taliban militants maintain strongholds. A teenage boy appeared at the funeral and was thought to be a mourner, witnesses and local police said.
WORLD
December 7, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
A pair of suicide bombers attacked a large gathering of anti-Taliban elders inside a government compound in northwestern Pakistan on Monday, killing at least 41 people in one of the worst terrorist strikes in the volatile tribal belt this year. The attack occurred in the town of Ghalanai at the administrative headquarters of Mohmand, a region along the Afghan border that continues to see periodic clashes between Taliban militants and Pakistani troops. A meeting was underway at the compound between leaders of a local anti-Taliban militia and a top Mohmand official, authorities said.
WORLD
July 9, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez and Zulfiqar Ali, Los Angeles Times
Suicide bomb blasts tore through a busy market in a volatile tribal region along the Afghan border Friday, killing more than 55 people in an attack that illustrated the Taliban insurgency's potency despite several recent offensives carried out by Pakistani troops against militants in the country's tribal belt. The explosions took place in the village of Yaka Ghund in the Mohmand tribal region, outside the offices of a senior Mohmand administrator, police said. More than 100 people were injured.
OPINION
February 4, 2002
Re "Bush Vows to Take War on Terror to Hostile Nations, Calls for Unity," Jan. 30: After 1) opposing the Taliban many years before most Americans had ever heard of it; 2) allowing the United States to use its air space for attacking the Taliban; 3) providing crucial intelligence on the Taliban and military aid to the Northern Alliance, the dominant anti-Taliban force; 4) opening its roads and ports on the Persian Gulf to humanitarian aid sent to the Afghan people; 5) using its strong influence over the Northern Alliance to help prevent failure of the international conference in Germany that brought the present Afghan government to power; and 6)
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