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Anti Terrorist

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1997
A three-year audit of the Los Angeles Police Department's Anti-Terrorist Division found relatively few problems with the way officers in the unit performed their secretive duties. Despite a concern by some activists that the unit's intelligence-gathering powers could be abused to violate people's civil and privacy rights, the Police Commission audit found that nearly all investigations were handled properly.
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NEWS
April 23, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than four months of negotiations, rumors, threats and rhetorical posturing by the government and the guerrillas, Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori ended the marathon hostage standoff at the Japanese ambassador's residence in Lima in characteristic style. The president ordered a secretive, surprising and extremely risky military raid, the speed and skill of which matched the prowess of the attack by the leftist rebels who took over the mansion Dec. 17.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1996 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Chris Cox (R-Newport Beach) has been appointed to a nonpartisan anti-terrorism task force formed to beef up the nation's security in the wake of the crash of TWA's Flight 800 and the bombing at the Olympics, government officials announced Tuesday. Cox said following the announcement that the task force is "getting down to business very quickly" to find ways to "supercharge" current anti-terrorism laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996
The police explanation of why Sgt. Daniel Christian shot and killed his SWAT teammate James Jensen Jr. is hardly reassuring: that he "mistook his partner for a suspected drug dealer." So, obviously, it is perfectly acceptable to kill suspected drug dealers or, perhaps, suspects in general. It is this attitude, and the readiness to kill, that caused the death of Jensen. The Oxnard police SWAT team in this predawn raid was poised and primed to blast anything that moved and this is exactly what Sgt. Christian did when he fired repeatedly into the smoky darkness.
NEWS
February 11, 1996 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wires from the polygraph machine had come off, and finally the intense questioning by investigators from the Central Intelligence Agency was over. Robert Cleare, an American spy who had once been on the CIA's career fast track, had just endured a combined total of 19 hours of interrogation by his employer. Yet even as his grilling was completed in the fall of 1993, Cleare's troubles were just beginning.
NEWS
October 29, 1995 | JOHN MINTZ, WASHINGTON POST
The U.S. military should share with civilian architects the lessons it has learned about protecting sensitive government buildings from terrorist attacks, including ways of strengthening a structure's lower floors to make it bomb-resistant, a new government report says.
NEWS
May 16, 1995 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Monday denounced the National Rifle Assn. in his bluntest language yet, saying that the powerful gun lobby should be "ashamed" for describing federal agents as "jackbooted government thugs" in a fund-raising letter. Clinton renewed his attack on critics of federal law enforcement during a somber ceremony for fallen police officers, saying that no one has a right to "run down" law enforcement "or to suggest that it is somehow all right for them to be put in harm's way."
NEWS
April 28, 1995
Highlights of President Clinton's new anti-terrorism measures: Hire 1,000 new agents, prosecutors and other federal law enforcement and support personnel to investigate, deter and prosecute terrorist activity. Require within a year that microscopic particles be placed in certain raw materials used in making bombs to make it easier for police to trace the source of explosive devices after detonation. Study whether common materials used in bombs, such as fertilizer, can be made non-explosive.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City has injected new urgency into the debate over the nation's immigration laws and is expected to lead to swift and significant changes in immigration and counterterrorism policies, according to lawmakers and other legal experts. It has not yet been determined whether international causes or grievances had a role in the blast or whether any recent immigrants to this country were involved.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During his two years as administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, James Lee Witt has presided over 62 disasters: fires, floods, earthquakes, hurricanes and tornadoes. But he had never seen anything like what he saw here Thursday: a disaster caused not by nature but by "somebody meaner than hell."
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