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Antibodies

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers studying the AIDS virus report in the journal Nature that it could remain infectious even when surrounded by neutralizing antibodies that would normally destroy it. A team at Virginia Commonwealth University examined follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in the lymph nodes where large amounts of HIV, the AIDS virus, congregate. Although most viruses are inactivated when they are trapped by the dendritic cells, clearing the way for the patient to recover from infection, they found that HIV remains infectious.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
October 11, 2013 | By Karen Ravn
Fall is in the air and so, alas, are zillions of grains of weed pollen, sailing hither and yon, high and low, far and wide. These guarantee an abundance of new little weeds next year - and an abundance of sniffy, sneezy, wheezy people right now, namely those unfortunate souls who have an allergy to pollen. Pollen allergy is often called "hay fever," although it doesn't cause fever and its only connection with hay is that it inflicts its woes at hay-harvesting time. The name "seasonal allergic rhinitis" - where "rhinitis" refers to an inflamed nose - is more accurate if less evocative.
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HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Deepi Brar
When you pop a pill in the future, don't expect old-fashioned results. Thanks to new advances in the lab and a deeper understanding of the human body, drugs are becoming highly personalized and precisely targeted. And the hope is they'll also be more effective. A new appreciation of our individual differences could spell the end of one-size-fits-all medicine. Our genes, lifestyles, environmental influences and even the bacteria in our guts work together to make us the people we are. All of these factors - and more - dictate how we respond to pills, tablets and capsules.
HEALTH
September 13, 2012 | By Deepi Brar
When you pop a pill in the future, don't expect old-fashioned results. Thanks to new advances in the lab and a deeper understanding of the human body, drugs are becoming highly personalized and precisely targeted. And the hope is they'll also be more effective. A new appreciation of our individual differences could spell the end of one-size-fits-all medicine. Our genes, lifestyles, environmental influences and even the bacteria in our guts work together to make us the people we are. All of these factors - and more - dictate how we respond to pills, tablets and capsules.
NEWS
January 5, 1991 | From Reuters
Researchers Friday claimed a breakthrough in the development of disease-fighting human monoclonal antibodies. Scientists in Schering-Plough Corp.'s Laboratory for Immunological Research in Dardilly, France, said they were able, for the first time, to grow the cells that produce human antibodies in a laboratory culture.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Antibodies produced by genetically engineered plants seem to work just as well as those naturally produced by the body, researchers reported. The antibodies, nicknamed "plantibodies," worked against the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), which causes genital herpes, the researchers reported in the journal Nature Biotechnology. Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1995 | From Times staff and wire reports
A vaccine that blocks cocaine from reaching the brain could hold the promise of a new treatment for addicts, according to scientists at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla. George Koob and his colleagues found they could use a chemical structurally similar to cocaine to create antibodies against the drug. These antibodies stopped the drug from moving into the brain--at least in rats, Koob's group reported in Nature.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers at the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla have developed a new, inexpensive technique for producing specialized antibodies that promises to open up a whole new area of medicine, including cancer therapy, and to greatly expand medical diagnostics. The technique also could be used to give agricultural crops a functioning "immune system" that would protect them against insects, funguses and other pathogens and to create new plants that could be used to clean up polluted waterways and soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1987 | Compiled from Times staff and wire service reports
Stanford researchers have reported what appears to be the first significant use of monoclonal antibodies to help transplant tissues in animals. Transplant recipients often have trouble incorporating foreign tissues into their bodies, and doctors have had to rely on powerful and often dangerous drugs to keep such patients from rejecting the transplants. If the Stanford discovery eventually helps humans overcome the rejection problem, it would make transplants much safer.
NEWS
March 27, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Scientists believe they may have finally discovered a major cause of colic in breast-fed babies. St. Louis researchers said Tuesday that cow antibodies in human breast milk may be the cause of the dreaded--but usually not serious--condition.
NEWS
April 19, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II / For the Booster Shots blog
Researchers at San Diego's Scripps Research Institute have developed what they say could be the first effective treatment for cocaine overdoses. Their technique, which uses synthetically produced antibodies to bind cocaine and remove it from circulation, has so far been tried only in mice, but the team hopes to start human trials soon -- if they can produce enough of the antibodies in an economically viable manner. Immunologists Jennifer B. Treweek and Kim D. Janda of Scripps have in the past been working on so-called active vaccine against cocaine and nicotine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Physicist Rosalyn S. Yalow, who shared the 1977 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the development of a medical diagnostic test that revolutionized patient care and led to a new understanding of diabetes and a host of other diseases, died May 30 in the Bronx, N.Y. She was 89. No cause of death was announced. Although her work in medical diagnostics was seminal, she was perhaps equally well known for her temerity in entering a field that had previously been dominated by men and for her persistence in pursuing her goals in the face of opposition from the establishment and the opposite sex. She was only the second woman to win the Nobel in medicine and only the sixth to win a Nobel in any science.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Construction is set to begin this month on a $95-million development in Santa Monica where a local biotech company will manufacture antibodies to fight cancer. The project, which received city approval this week, allows a consolidation and expansion of operations for Agensys Inc. The Santa Monica firm researches and develops new cancer therapies, some of which are in clinical trials. Agensys will consolidate its office, research, laboratory and manufacturing space in the development at 1800 Stewart St. on land leased from the city.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
An effective vaccine against the AIDS virus may have moved one step closer to reality, researchers said Thursday. Federal researchers have identified a pair of naturally occurring antibodies that are able to kill more than 90% of all strains of the AIDS virus, a finding they say could lead to the development of new treatments for HIV infections and to the production of the first successful vaccine against the virus. HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, is notoriously mutable, changing the composition of proteins on its surface with ease to escape pressure from the immune system.
SCIENCE
February 11, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Three years after the U.S. blood-banking industry recommended against transfusing plasma from female donors because of a potentially life-threatening antibody reaction, researchers have found that plasma from women may actually be better, not worse, for heart surgery patients. In a study of patients treated before the new guidelines were implemented, those receiving plasma from women were only half as likely to suffer lung complications from the surgery and were 45% less likely to be hospitalized or die in the 10 days after surgery, a Duke University Medical Center team reported.
NEWS
September 11, 2009
AIDS antibodies: A Sept. 4 article and headline in Section A about the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies against the AIDS virus said the antibodies could block progression of an infection to AIDS. They cannot. Rather, researchers hope that similar antibodies stimulated by a vaccine could prevent a person from becoming infected in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A certain type of antibody in the blood can apparently increase the risk of stroke, researchers from the University of Maryland Medical Center reported last week at an American Heart Assn. meeting. In a study at 16 medical centers, they found that the so-called anticardiolipin antibodies were more than twice as likely to be found in stroke patients as in people hospitalized for other medical conditions.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers at the Scripps Clinic in San Diego have developed a powerful new technique that will allow scientists to identify and isolate specialized antibodies, especially human antibodies, for medical and other uses far more quickly and inexpensively than was previously possible.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
After 15 years of futile search for a vaccine against the AIDS virus, researchers are reporting the tantalizing discovery of antibodies that can prevent the virus from multiplying in the body and producing severe disease. They do not have a vaccine yet, but they may well have a road map toward the production of one. A team based at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla reports in Friday's journal Science that they have isolated two so-called broadly neutralizing antibodies that can block the action of many strains of HIV, the virus responsible for AIDS.
HEALTH
July 20, 2009 | Emily Sohn
There are various types of food-allergy tests, but beware: They're not all equally accurate. Some, in fact, can be very misleading. By far the best are food challenge tests, in which a person is fed carefully regulated amounts of food, under close supervision, and the amounts are gradually increased. Other tests examine blood or skin reactions. These are more common -- and also less reliable.
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