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Antibodies

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1999 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Channel Islands National Park should immediately be closed until federal officials can design a more effective system for warning visitors about a potentially deadly virus carried by mice at the popular tourist destination, Rep. Elton Gallegly said Tuesday. The call for action comes after a 7-year-old Oxnard boy was found playing with a deer mouse on Santa Rosa Island that later tested positive for hantavirus antibodies.
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BUSINESS
December 28, 1998 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Biotechnology, an industry that has had more than its share of hype and disappointment, enters 1999 with a large number of promising medical products in development. Several are expected to complete crucial tests or be sent to the Food and Drug Administration for marketing approval in the coming year. The biotech drugs farthest along include several artificial antibodies that target cancer or dampen a hyperactive immune system in diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma.
NEWS
November 30, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Antibodies produced by genetically engineered plants seem to work just as well as those naturally produced by the body, researchers reported. The antibodies, nicknamed "plantibodies," worked against the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2), which causes genital herpes, the researchers reported in the journal Nature Biotechnology. Dr.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1998 | PAUL JACOBS
In the December edition of Nature Biotechnology, researchers from Johns Hopkins University and ReProtect in Baltimore, Monsanto's Agracetus division in Wisconsin, and Protein Design Labs in Mountain View, Calif., report that they have been able to create soy plants that make antibodies to the genital herpes virus. There is still a long way to go before these antibodies are tested in humans and approved by regulators as safe and effective against herpes infection.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1998 | Barbara Murphy
The U.S. Patent Office has issued a patent for the use of poultry antibodies to determine the number of blood cells in humans to the inventors of the technology, doctors Tomas Lindahl and Anders Larsson, clinical hemostasis researchers in Sweden. Biopool International in Ventura entered into an agreement with the inventors in 1994 to be the exclusive worldwide licensee of the technology and has funded expenses associated with obtaining the patent.
BUSINESS
January 1, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Cell Genesys Inc.'s Abgenix unit said it has licensed technology for using mice to develop human antibodies to Pfizer Inc., an agreement that could bring it $30 million plus eventual royalties. The worldwide research collaboration and licensing agreement will give Pfizer access to Abgenix's XenoMouse, a breed of mice that can produce human antibodies to fight diseases when given human genes, Abgenix said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1997
Injections of an antibody that targets a natural human protein are showing promise in hard-to-treat cases of Crohn's disease, a chronic digestive illness. The treatment involves injections of an antibody called cA2. It neutralizes a protein known as tumor necrosis factor that is believed to play a role in causing Crohn's disease. The study is published in today's New England Journal of Medicine. The treatment, which has not been approved for routine use, was developed by Centocor Inc.
NEWS
August 6, 1997 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II and HEATHER KNIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two Navy researchers said Tuesday that they have devised a way to prevent the body from rejecting transplants without suppressing the whole immune system and leaving the recipient vulnerable to infections. Preliminary experiments on monkeys suggest that the treatment also could free organ recipients from the need to take anti-rejection drugs for the rest of their lives, thereby greatly reducing the cost and complications of transplants, the researchers said. Lt. Cmdr. Allan D. Kirk and Capt.
NEWS
April 2, 1997 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although as many as 9,000 helpings of frozen fruit potentially contaminated by hepatitis A were eaten in Los Angeles city schools, there is no need to panic about a widespread outbreak, health officials said Tuesday. That is because the disease is largely preventable if those who ate the fruit get immune system-boosting shots within the next week and follow mom's advice: "Wash your hands." "The general public should not be alarmed," said Dr.
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