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Antigua

NATIONAL
October 26, 2002 | Mark Fineman, Eric Slater and Sam Howe Verhovek, Times Staff Writers
TACOMA, Wash. -- Suspected sniper John Allen Muhammad had a fondness for the Bushmaster .223-caliber rifle, the model linked to 11 of the 14 shootings that terrorized the nation's capital. He bought two of them at gun shops here in the last three years -- including the suspected murder weapon, according to gun shop employees and other sources.
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TRAVEL
May 20, 2001 | ROBERT A. DUNTON, Robert A. Dunton is a freelance writer in San Diego
Over dinner one night, a trusted globe-trotting friend dropped the name "Antigua." Visions of coconut-laden palm trees and lapping turquoise waters immediately flashed through my head. "The Caribbean island, right?" I blurted. "No," Joe replied. "Guatemalan Antigua. It has the most amazing colonial architecture and great language schools--inexpensive too. You, mi amigo, have got to go."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2000 | SCOTT WILSON, Scott Wilson is a research librarian for The Times
In a lush valley 5,000 feet up in the mountains lies this 457-year-old city, dwarfed by the three volcanoes that surround it. Visitors from around the world are drawn here, partly by its beauty and history, but mostly by its 60 Spanish-language schools. Foreigners spend anywhere from two weeks to two months in Antigua in intensive, one-on-one language training, and eventually they yearn for a break from verb conjugations and pronunciation drills.
NEWS
September 6, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighteen months ago, two U.S. immigration agents brought 43-year-old Shelley Tennyson Joseph home in handcuffs to a land he hardly knew. Back in 1980, he had been sentenced to 55 years in prison for committing a rape and armed robbery on St. Croix, in the U.S. Virgin Islands. Joseph recalls that he said to himself: "I can't serve that time. I'm going to let that time serve me."
NEWS
August 19, 2000 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He called himself Dragon, and she was Amber--a notoriously irreverent Internet queen. Yet neighbors insist that they hadn't a clue what really went on inside the seaside villa that the gregarious U.S. businessman and young British woman had been renting on this not-so-sleepy Caribbean island.
NEWS
July 4, 2000 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A fatal shooting lies at the heart of noted Chilean writer Marcela Serrano's latest novel. The heroine, Violeta Dasinski, kills her abusive husband, Eduardo. This act of violence transforms the lives of Violeta and her lifelong friend Josefa Ferrer, the narrator. But the way Serrano tells the story, the shooting is oddly muffled, almost insignificant, like the speck of grit in an oyster shell that gives rise to layers of pearl.
NEWS
October 21, 1999 | From Associated Press
Hurricane Jose ripped roofs from houses, tore down a newly built church and flung debris through deserted streets Wednesday as it hit Antigua head-on and threatened a string of other Caribbean islands. Storm-weary islanders in neighboring St. Kitts, where a few homes remain roofless from last year's devastating hurricane season, braced themselves as Jose bore down packing 100-mph winds and drenching rain. "It's projected to move right across the Leeward Islands.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the polls closed and the counting began in this Caribbean nation's bitterly fought general elections Tuesday night, the opposition candidates followed what has become a tradition in their decades-long pursuit of power: They all went into hiding. But when the final tallies were in Wednesday morning in this country long awash in mysteries unsolved and charges unproved, they all were safe. They'd lost--again. The long-ruling Bird dynasty remained intact.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First came reports about arms and ammunition: shipping containers packed with rifles, grenades, launchers, pistols, bullets and tear gas, all consigned to the government of Antigua and Barbuda. Then an unknown arsonist torched the headquarters of the twin-island nation's opposition newspaper. And then Antigua's only prison burned to the ground.
NEWS
April 15, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taffy and Bonnie Bufton don't live here anymore. Until a few months ago, the aging Welsh couple were the only residents of tiny Guiana Island--447 acres of cactus, thorn bush, mangrove and rocks. Their realm: two ramshackle houses, a 36-volt generator, 70 sheep, about 50 fallow deer, an ancient tractor and Taffy's rusty 1953 British sedan. For more than 30 years, the Buftons drank rainwater filtered through socks. The couple, now in their 70s, tended the deer and the sheep.
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