Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAntipsychotic Drugs
IN THE NEWS

Antipsychotic Drugs

FEATURED ARTICLES
SCIENCE
January 15, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
A widely used class of antipsychotic drugs that includes bestsellers Zyprexa, Risperdal and Seroquel is just as likely -- perhaps even more likely -- to cause a fatal heart attack as older antipsychotic drugs like haloperidol, researchers reported today. The findings, which run contrary to a long-standing belief, add to a growing drumbeat of criticism about this class of drugs, known as atypical antipsychotics.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
May 30, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
A widely used antioxidant supplement can reduce some of the symptoms of autism in children, a pilot study has found. The supplement -- N-acetylcysteine, or NAC -- lowered irritability in the children and reduced repetitive behaviors, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine reported in the journal Biological Psychiatry. The team cautioned, however, that only 31 children were enrolled and that larger studies are needed to confirm the potential benefit. Currently, irritability, mood swings and depression in autistic children are treated with antipsychotic drugs.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
September 6, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Sales for children of antipsychotic medicines made by Johnson & Johnson, AstraZeneca and Pfizer Inc. have exploded, fueled by a fortyfold increase over nine years in the number of children diagnosed with bipolar disorder. The number of prescriptions for children doubled to 4.4 million from 2003 to 2006, according to data provided to Bloomberg by Wolters Kluwer, a drug-tracking company.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams
Tucson shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner can be forcibly medicated with antipsychotic drugs, a federal appeals court ruled Monday. In a 2-1 ruling, the U.S. 9 th Circuit Court of Appeals said prison authorities have the right to treat an inmate who would otherwise be a danger to himself or others around him. Loughner, 23, has been charged with 49 felony counts in the Jan. 8, 2011, shooting rampage outside of a Tucson supermarket in...
NATIONAL
June 30, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Accused Tucson gunman Jared Lee Loughner can be forced to take antipsychotic drugs while doctors attempt to make him fit to stand trial in the shooting of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and 18 others, a federal judge ruled Wednesday. Loughner, 22, is accused of killing six and wounding 13 during a Jan. 8 rampage as Giffords was greeting constituents. The Arizona Democrat was shot in the head but survived. "I defer to medical doctors," U.S. District Judge Larry A. Burns said at an emergency hearing requested by the defense.
SCIENCE
October 12, 2006 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Drugs widely prescribed to control agitation, aggression, hallucinations or delusions in Alzheimer's patients provided few, if any, benefits and carried severe side effects, according to a large study released Wednesday. The findings challenged conventional wisdom about the medications and painted a grim picture of the state of Alzheimer's treatment. "We need a new generation of drugs for these very serious behaviors," said Dr. Thomas R.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Attorneys for the government and Jared Lee Loughner battled before a federal appeals court panel Tuesday over whether forcing antipsychotic drugs on the Tucson shooting defendant is legally justified and likely to restore his mental competency to stand trial on capital charges. In a complex debate citing the mere handful of similar cases in federal court archives, Assistant U.S. Atty. Christina M. Cabanillas told a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that prison doctors, not judges and lawyers, were in the best position to decide what medications are needed to make Loughner fit for trial.
SCIENCE
May 30, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
A widely used antioxidant supplement can reduce some of the symptoms of autism in children, a pilot study has found. The supplement -- N-acetylcysteine, or NAC -- lowered irritability in the children and reduced repetitive behaviors, researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine reported in the journal Biological Psychiatry. The team cautioned, however, that only 31 children were enrolled and that larger studies are needed to confirm the potential benefit. Currently, irritability, mood swings and depression in autistic children are treated with antipsychotic drugs.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Elderly patients with dementia were significantly more likely to die prematurely if taking certain antipsychotic drugs, the government said in an advisory Monday to healthcare workers and patients. The Food and Drug Administration is asking manufacturers of atypical antipsychotic drugs to add to their labeling a boxed warning noting the risks and that the drugs were not approved to treat symptoms of dementia in the elderly.
HEALTH
February 6, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Schizophrenics who took two antipsychotic drugs showed no more improvement than those on a single drug, raising doubts about the benefit of using multiple medicines to treat the disease, researchers have found. The study, published in the Feb. 2 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, tested 68 patients who responded poorly to clozapine, the generic version of Novartis AG's Clozaril. Half the group took clozapine along with Johnson & Johnson's antipsychotic Risperdal.
NATIONAL
March 5, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Tucson shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner can be forced to take antipsychotic drugs while prison doctors try to make him sane enough to stand trial in the attack last year on then-Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and others, a divided federal appeals court ruled Monday. Loughner's violent behavior at a prison hospital in Missouri justified his forced medication, even though a pretrial detainee might normally have the right to refuse unwanted drugs, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals said in a 2-1 ruling.
NATIONAL
November 2, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Attorneys for the government and Jared Lee Loughner battled before a federal appeals court panel Tuesday over whether forcing antipsychotic drugs on the Tucson shooting defendant is legally justified and likely to restore his mental competency to stand trial on capital charges. In a complex debate citing the mere handful of similar cases in federal court archives, Assistant U.S. Atty. Christina M. Cabanillas told a three-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that prison doctors, not judges and lawyers, were in the best position to decide what medications are needed to make Loughner fit for trial.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Prison doctors are violating the rights of Tucson shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner by forcibly medicating him with drugs more powerful than needed to control his outbursts, defense lawyers told a federal appeals court Tuesday. The three-judge panel weighing Loughner's plea for an end to the involuntary medication with anti-psychotic drugs appeared sensitive to the defendant's legal arguments that, as he hasn't been tried on the 49 felony counts against him, he should retain the right to decide what drugs go into his body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Attorneys for Tucson shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner asked a federal appeals court to order an end to his forced medication at a prison hospital, arguing in papers filed Thursday that the government is violating his constitutional right to refuse potentially dangerous antipsychotic drugs. The appeal of U.S. District Judge Larry A. Burns' decision last month, that prison doctors are in a better position to prescribe treatment for the diagnosed schizophrenic than are the courts, is the latest legal volley between Loughner's public defenders and the U.S. attorney's office in Tucson over how to restore his mental competency to stand trial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Tucson shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner can refuse anti-psychotic medication until his appeal of the treatment prescribed by prison doctors is decided, a federal appeals court ruled Tuesday. Loughner, who has been deemed mentally ill and incompetent to stand trial in the Jan. 8 shooting rampage that killed six and injured 13, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, is in custody at a federal prison medical center in Missouri. Doctors there began treating him against his will with psychotropic drugs a month ago, prompting his lawyers to ask the courts to halt the forced medication that they said could irreparably harm or even kill the 22-year-old suspect.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | By Carol J. Williams
Tucson shooting suspect Jared Lee Loughner can be forcibly medicated with antipsychotic drugs, a federal appeals court ruled Monday. In a 2-1 ruling, the U.S. 9 th Circuit Court of Appeals said prison authorities have the right to treat an inmate who would otherwise be a danger to himself or others around him. Loughner, 23, has been charged with 49 felony counts in the Jan. 8, 2011, shooting rampage outside of a Tucson supermarket in...
Los Angeles Times Articles
|