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BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
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WORLD
October 25, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
An Ontario Superior Court judge struck down a section of Canada's Anti-Terrorism Act, saying it violated guarantees of freedom of religion and thought. Judge Douglas Rutherford made the decision in the case of Mohammed Momin Khawaja, a Canadian man charged with conspiring to carry out bombings in Britain. Rutherford said a clause that limits the definition of terrorist activity to acts motivated by religion, politics or ideology was unconstitutional. He left the rest of the act in place.
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BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
WORLD
October 25, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
An Ontario Superior Court judge struck down a section of Canada's Anti-Terrorism Act, saying it violated guarantees of freedom of religion and thought. Judge Douglas Rutherford made the decision in the case of Mohammed Momin Khawaja, a Canadian man charged with conspiring to carry out bombings in Britain. Rutherford said a clause that limits the definition of terrorist activity to acts motivated by religion, politics or ideology was unconstitutional. He left the rest of the act in place.
NEWS
June 29, 1988 | Associated Press
The government can't shut down the Palestine Liberation Organization's observer mission to the United Nations, a federal judge ruled today. The Anti-Terrorism Act passed by Congress does not supersede U.S. obligations under its 1947 Headquarters Agreement with the United Nations, U.S. District Judge Edmund Palmieri said.
NEWS
August 10, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistani military ruler Gen. Pervez Musharraf issued a decree that seemed to bar ex-Prime Ministers Benazir Bhutto and Nawaz Sharif from holding party offices because of court convictions. Proclaimed in the name of figurehead President Mohammed Rafiq Tarar, it said any person disqualified from being a parliament member or convicted of a criminal offense involving moral turpitude or under the Anti-Terrorism Act could not be an officeholder.
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A federal judge ruled Wednesday that the United States cannot close the Palestine Liberation Organization's mission to the United Nations. U.S. District Court Judge Edmund Palmieri said the Anti-Terrorism Act of 1987 does not require the closure of the PLO's permanent observer mission to the United Nations, nor do the act's provisions "impair the continued exercise of its appropriate functions."
NEWS
March 15, 1988
The head of the Palestine Liberation Organization's U.N. mission vowed to defy a U.S. order to close the group's office, challenging Atty. Gen. Edwin Meese III to "put me behind bars." Zehdi Labib Terzi also said that if the mission is closed, then Israel should be excluded from U.N. debates on the Middle East. "We have the right to stay here, we will stay here and we will stay where we are," he added. The PLO has permanent U.N. observer status.
NEWS
July 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
William H. Webster, former director of the FBI and later the CIA, was appointed Monday to lead the Commission on the Advancement of Federal Law Enforcement. Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist named Webster to the panel, which is being created under the 1996 Death Penalty and Anti-Terrorism Act.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1997 | DAVID B. OTTAWAY, WASHINGTON POST
Four months after President Clinton signed a law last year barring financial transactions between American corporations and countries accused of supporting terrorism, the administration quietly exempted one such country--Sudan--where Occidental Petroleum Corp. was seeking a stake in a $930-million oil deal, according to federal officials and documents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1988
A federal judge in New York has now put aright what Congress so ill-advisedly set awry. District Court Judge Edmund L. Palmieri has ruled that the U.S. government has no legal authority to order the closure of the Palestine Liberation Organization mission to the United Nations.
NEWS
August 30, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
In a clear victory for the State Department, the Reagan Administration decided Monday not to appeal a federal court decision prohibiting the U.S. government from closing the Palestine Liberation Organization's observer mission at the United Nations. The Justice Department, which had wanted to try to overturn the ruling, issued a terse announcement that the Administration had decided "that, on balance, the interests of the United States are best served by not appealing."
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