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Antiviral

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Even if the horror-thriller "Antiviral" wasn't written and directed by David Cronenberg's son, Brandon, this meat locker of a movie might still invite comparisons to much of the elder filmmaker's signature output. Stark, startling and weirdly inventive, "Antiviral" is set in a vaguely futuristic dystopia where the cult of celebrity has become that much more, well, cultish. The deal: Fans can get closer than ever to their favorite superstars by being injected with famous folks' viruses, which are harvested and brokered by high-security clinics.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Even if the horror-thriller "Antiviral" wasn't written and directed by David Cronenberg's son, Brandon, this meat locker of a movie might still invite comparisons to much of the elder filmmaker's signature output. Stark, startling and weirdly inventive, "Antiviral" is set in a vaguely futuristic dystopia where the cult of celebrity has become that much more, well, cultish. The deal: Fans can get closer than ever to their favorite superstars by being injected with famous folks' viruses, which are harvested and brokered by high-security clinics.
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HEALTH
September 21, 2009 | Shari Roan
Mononucleosis, the curse of high school and college students, doesn't have to bring social and academic lives to a screeching halt, researchers say. Instead, the disease can be treated to shorten the duration of the illness and reduce the chance of transmission. In a study presented Sept. 14 at the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in San Francisco, University of Minnesota researchers found that students who receive an antiviral medication early in the course of the illness become less sick than those offered the standard advice to rest for several weeks.
NEWS
January 18, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
A major advance in treating hepatitis C appears to be on the horizon. Researchers reported Wednesday that combining two antiviral medications was effective in stopping the infection in some patients who were not helped by the traditional treatment. Progress in fighting hepatitis C infection is of high importance because millions of Americans have the virus. However, the standard treatment with the medication interferon, while effective in many people, is linked to severe side effects.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
I am bone-tired all of the time. I also have dry skin, dry, brittle hair and nails that break easily. I asked my doctor if the problem could be linked to my thyroid. She ran a blood test for TSH and says it is OK. (It is just over 5.) Your TSH level suggests inadequate thyroid hormone. There is a controversy about what TSH levels are normal, but thyroid experts now believe the range is between 0.3 and 3. High cholesterol, depression, fatigue and difficulty losing weight are all indicative of low thyroid.
HEALTH
September 14, 2009 | Shari Roan
The flu tends to come on suddenly -- you're fine in the morning and aching and shivering that night -- while a cold usually develops gradually over the course of two or three days. Flu usually causes a fever and aches; a cold usually doesn't. Other symptoms of the flu include headache, fatigue, cough, sore throat, nasal congestion, body aches, chills and, usually in children, vomiting or diarrhea. How do I know if it's the novel H1N1 strain? Unless your doctor orders a test, you won't.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1989 | United Press International
Epitope Inc. announced that the Securities and Exchange Commission has approved its sale of 1.25 million shares of common stock at $5 each. Shares in the biotechnology company are being sold to a limited number of U.S. and European institutional and other qualified investors, officials said. Sutro & Co. of San Francisco is the underwriter for the stock offering. Net proceeds from the offering will be used in development of new diagnostic tests for AIDS, therapeutic drugs for malaria, antiviral barriers and novel plant varieties, as well as general corporate purposes, Epitope officials said.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2011 | By David Willman, Los Angeles Times
Over the last year, the Obama administration has aggressively pushed a $433-million plan to buy an experimental smallpox drug, despite uncertainty over whether it is needed or will work. Senior officials have taken unusual steps to secure the contract for New York-based Siga Technologies Inc., whose controlling shareholder is billionaire Ronald O. Perelman, one of the world's richest men and a longtime Democratic Party donor. When Siga complained that contracting specialists at the Department of Health and Human Services were resisting the company's financial demands, senior officials replaced the government's lead negotiator for the deal, interviews and documents show.
HEALTH
December 4, 2000 | MARNELL JAMESON
For some high-risk individuals who don't get their flu shot until later this month, antiviral medication taken preventively may be an option. If a patient is at high risk for developing life-threatening complications from the flu, a doctor or other health-care provider may prescribe one of three federally approved antivirals. These should be taken for two weeks after a person receives a flu shot until the immunity from the vaccine has kicked in.
SCIENCE
April 28, 2009 | Shari Roan
Pharmacies are bracing for an increased demand for antiviral medications even as health officials warned that the drugs, designed for treating and preventing influenza, should be used judiciously.
NEWS
October 21, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration has amped up warnings on the label of the commonly prescribed HIV antiviral Invirase , adding information about potentially life-threatening cardiac side effects when used in tandem with Norvir, another widely used antiviral. The new labeling requirement follows an FDA warning in February that the drugs taken together could affect electrical activity in the heart, prolonging what are known as QT and PR intervals – indicators of heart rhythm on an EKG. Prolongation of the QT interval can lead to an abnormal heart rhythm known as torsades de pointes, which can cause lightheadedness or fainting and, in some cases, life-threatening ventricular fibrillation.
NEWS
August 24, 2010
A study of birth records in Denmark shows no increase in birth defects among children born to mothers who received the antiviral drugs acyclovir, valacyclovir and famciclovir during the first trimester of pregnancy, researchers said Monday. The drugs are often used to treat herpes simplex and herpes zoster infections. About two out of every 1,000 American women are exposed to the drugs during the first trimester, researchers from the National Institutes of Child Health and Human Development said in an editorial accompanying the report in the Journal of the American Medical Assn.
NEWS
August 9, 2010
An experimental antiviral agent called boceprevir doubled the cure rate for hepatitis C in a small phase 2 clinical trial designed to show efficacy, researchers reported Sunday. The drug will now be submitted to the larger Phase 3 trial required for approval of the drug by the Food and Drug Administration. Hepatitis C is a chronic viral infection that affects an estimated 170 million people worldwide, leading eventually to cirrhosis and liver cancer if not controlled. The standard treatment now is a 48-week regimen of pegylated interferon, which boosts the immune system, and the antiviral agent ribavirin, which is a general-purpose antiviral agent.
SCIENCE
December 4, 2009 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
An experimental antiviral drug that works by a different mechanism than existing drugs has been shown to suppress hepatitis C in chimpanzees and is already being tested in human clinical trials, researchers reported Thursday. The new agent is a so-called antisense drug that binds to RNA required by the virus for replication, preventing the virus from proliferating in the liver. Preliminary tests suggest that the drug, called SPC3649, has no toxic side effects, does not allow development of resistance -- which plagues other hepatitis drugs -- and has lasting effects after treatment has stopped.
HEALTH
September 21, 2009 | Shari Roan
Mononucleosis, the curse of high school and college students, doesn't have to bring social and academic lives to a screeching halt, researchers say. Instead, the disease can be treated to shorten the duration of the illness and reduce the chance of transmission. In a study presented Sept. 14 at the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy in San Francisco, University of Minnesota researchers found that students who receive an antiviral medication early in the course of the illness become less sick than those offered the standard advice to rest for several weeks.
HEALTH
September 14, 2009 | Shari Roan
The flu tends to come on suddenly -- you're fine in the morning and aching and shivering that night -- while a cold usually develops gradually over the course of two or three days. Flu usually causes a fever and aches; a cold usually doesn't. Other symptoms of the flu include headache, fatigue, cough, sore throat, nasal congestion, body aches, chills and, usually in children, vomiting or diarrhea. How do I know if it's the novel H1N1 strain? Unless your doctor orders a test, you won't.
SCIENCE
February 7, 2009 | Mary Engel
A milder than usual U.S. flu season is masking a growing concern about widespread resistance to the antiviral drug Tamiflu and what that means for the nation's preparedness in case of a dangerous pandemic flu. Tamiflu, the most commonly used influenza antiviral and the mainstay of the federal government's emergency drug stockpile, no longer works for the dominant flu strain circulating in much of the country, government officials said this week.
SCIENCE
October 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A strain of the H5N1 bird flu virus is showing resistance to Tamiflu, the antiviral drug that countries around the world are now stockpiling to fend off the looming threat, researchers said. They urged drug manufacturers to make more effective versions of Relenza, another antiviral that is also known to be effective in battling the much-feared H5N1. Relenza is inhaled.
HEALTH
September 7, 2009 | Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon
I am bone-tired all of the time. I also have dry skin, dry, brittle hair and nails that break easily. I asked my doctor if the problem could be linked to my thyroid. She ran a blood test for TSH and says it is OK. (It is just over 5.) Your TSH level suggests inadequate thyroid hormone. There is a controversy about what TSH levels are normal, but thyroid experts now believe the range is between 0.3 and 3. High cholesterol, depression, fatigue and difficulty losing weight are all indicative of low thyroid.
HEALTH
August 24, 2009 | Shari Roan
Indiscriminate use of antiviral medications to prevent and treat influenza could ease the way for drug-resistant strains of the novel H1N1 virus, or swine flu, to emerge, public health officials warn -- making the fight against a pandemic that much harder. Already, a handful of cases of Tamiflu-resistant H1N1 have been reported this summer, and there is no shortage of examples of misuse of the antiviral medications, experts say. People often fail to complete a full course of the drug, according to a recent British report -- a scenario also likely to be occurring in the U.S. and one that encourages resistance.
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