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Antiwar Movement

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NATIONAL
December 12, 2009 | By Kate Linthicum
The antiwar movement isn't what it was in 2003. Then, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets across America to protest the lead-up to the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Today in Washington -- in what's billed as the largest peace protest since President Obama announced that he would send more soldiers to Afghanistan -- organizers are planning for a crowd of 1,500. "People are burned out," explained the rally's organizer, Laurie Dobson. As she and other antiwar activists struggle to remake their movement, they also acknowledge there are obstacles.
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NATIONAL
December 12, 2009 | By Kate Linthicum
The antiwar movement isn't what it was in 2003. Then, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets across America to protest the lead-up to the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Today in Washington -- in what's billed as the largest peace protest since President Obama announced that he would send more soldiers to Afghanistan -- organizers are planning for a crowd of 1,500. "People are burned out," explained the rally's organizer, Laurie Dobson. As she and other antiwar activists struggle to remake their movement, they also acknowledge there are obstacles.
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NEWS
March 21, 2003 | Rone Tempest and Aaron Zitner, Times Staff Writers
Only a month ago, John Brady Kiesling was a senior embassy officer in Athens, reading classified cables and defending U.S. policy on Iraq to Greek and European leaders. Today, as missiles thunder down on Baghdad, the 45-year-old Californian is touring college campuses -- including the U.S. Military Academy, Harvard and, on Thursday, UC Berkeley -- speaking out against the same Bush administration policy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2009
Jon Wiener's insightful review of "Underground" took an odd turn in its last sentence. ("His Bold Forecast Was Wrong," March 29) Are the lessons of Mark Rudd's candid reappraisal of the Weatherman's call for violent revolution really "irrelevant for our time"? I was at Columbia Law School when Rudd emerged as a leader of the antiwar movement. I chose to protest in the streets rather than to take over buildings. I chose to help organize with the National Lawyers Guild to defend protesters who got arrested.
NEWS
October 28, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As never before, their dance cards are full. Scholars of peace and diplomacy say that with little effort--and no exaggeration--they could schedule three speaking engagements per night. Elder statesmen of this country's antiwar movement report a similar surge in demand since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Academics who study terrorism or the Middle East are taking part in teach-ins that generally are packed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2002 | Staff and Wire Reports
Officials from Japanese political organizations are visiting Berkeley to learn about peace politics. The visitors held a conference Monday with council member Dona Spring to discuss strategies for Japan's fledgling antiwar movement. "It is very difficult to receive accurate information about American antiwar responses," said Kiyoshi Matsuya, of Japan's Rainbow and Green organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1996
Like Dennis Christopher, I too am a 40-year-old actor who fled his home at age 17 ("Call Him the 'Code' Breaker," by Janice Arkatov, May 26). However, instead of going immediately to college and joining the antiwar movement, I joined the Marine Corps to see the world and become a man. Upon my discharge two years later, I had only seen Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and San Juan, P.R., and the jury was still out on my manliness. I'm stretching the truth by saying I'm a 40-year-old, as I won't be until August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The Navy announced Friday that it planned to court-martial a sailor, now a vocal member of the antiwar movement, who refused deployment to the Persian Gulf because he opposed the U.S. mission in Iraq. Petty Officer 3rd Class Pablo Eduardo Paredes will face charges of being absent without leave and missing his ship, the Navy said. Paredes, 23, refused to board the amphibious assault ship Bonhomme Richard when it left Dec. 6 for the Persian Gulf.
OPINION
November 10, 2005 | Mark Rudd, MARK RUDD, who led the student uprising at Columbia University in 1968 and then became a member of the Weather Underground, teaches math at a community college in New Mexico.
I JOINED THE anti-Vietnam War movement as an 18-year-old college student, a freshman at Columbia University. It was the fall of 1965, just months after the U.S. began sending ground combat troops to Southeast Asia. The older members of the Columbia chapter of Students for a Democratic Society explained to me that unlike World War II, Vietnam was an imperial war, a war of occupation whose purpose was the repression of a national liberation movement.
OPINION
November 4, 2001 | JOHN BALZAR
The antiwar movement has shown its face but not its ideas. We've all seen the placards in the hands of scattered protesters--Stop This Racist War! Or, Stop the Bombing Now! So then what? Just what should the United States do if it won't fight in self-defense? Not in 60 years has America's antiwar movement been so wholly discounted in our national debate, even as it tries to rouse itself to action.
WORLD
August 11, 2006 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
A month into the war in Lebanon, Israel's long-quiescent peace movement is suddenly issuing a ringing call to arms. Isolated and beset by infighting in the first weeks of the conflict, the still-small peace camp was spurred into action by the Israeli government's authorization this week of a broader ground invasion in Lebanon.
NATIONAL
January 20, 2006 | Elizabeth Mehren, Times Staff Writer
In a dingy meeting room with walls the color of day-old oatmeal, 40 people in plastic chairs formed a ragged circle. Sharing first names, they went around the room: teachers, students, nurses and at least three active-duty service members. They had come to hear about military buildups around the world, but what they really wanted to do was hash out their feelings about the Iraq war. Fred wanted to know what to tell his 10th-grade grandson, who already worried that he would be sent to Iraq.
NATIONAL
December 11, 2005 | Art Pine, Special to The Times
Former Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy (D-Minn.), whose surprisingly strong showing in the 1968 New Hampshire presidential primary dramatized deepening public opposition to the Vietnam War and effectively ended President Lyndon B. Johnson's political career, died Saturday. He was 89. McCarthy died at a retirement home in the Georgetown section of Washington, where he had lived for several years.
OPINION
November 10, 2005 | Mark Rudd, MARK RUDD, who led the student uprising at Columbia University in 1968 and then became a member of the Weather Underground, teaches math at a community college in New Mexico.
I JOINED THE anti-Vietnam War movement as an 18-year-old college student, a freshman at Columbia University. It was the fall of 1965, just months after the U.S. began sending ground combat troops to Southeast Asia. The older members of the Columbia chapter of Students for a Democratic Society explained to me that unlike World War II, Vietnam was an imperial war, a war of occupation whose purpose was the repression of a national liberation movement.
NATIONAL
September 23, 2005 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
They left Crawford, Texas, three weeks ago, eager to build on the momentum created by Cindy Sheehan's antiwar vigil outside President Bush's ranch. After passing through 51 cities on the "Bring Them Home Now Tour," three busloads of protesters arrived at the National Mall on Wednesday, the vanguard of a movement that Iraq war protesters hope will bring 100,000 people to the capital this weekend.
WORLD
July 3, 2005 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
In a war of horrors, it was one of the worst chapters. On the morning of Feb. 5, 2000, more than 100 Russian contract soldiers and riot police entered the village of Novye Aldi in Chechnya, sweeping from house to house in a futile search for separatist rebels. What followed was what human rights investigators would later describe as "an orgy of killing, arson and rape." More than 55 civilians, ranging in age from 1 to 82, were shot, strangled or burned in their homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2003 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
As a prominent New York University protest leader against the Vietnam War, Leslie Cagan remembers men telling women to sit and listen quietly during meetings. Because they were not subject to the draft, female activists were told, they were not qualified to talk on the issue. "I, like other women, was outraged, and at one such meeting all the women got up and left the room," Cagan said. "That's when many women first started saying, 'Maybe we need a women's movement.'
OPINION
March 29, 2003
In "Democrats' Deja Vu (Commentary, March 24), David Frum scolds Democrats for past hatred of Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, Newt Gingrich and George W. Bush. "Hate," "hated" or "hatred" appear six times. Democrats are hate, hate, hating all the live-long day, and those who are in the antiwar movement are "more ambitious and more sinister -- than the antiwar movement of the 1960s." People who want soldiers to come home and not be killed just hate Bush. People who want clean air and clean water just hate Bush.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2005 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
The Navy announced Friday that it planned to court-martial a sailor, now a vocal member of the antiwar movement, who refused deployment to the Persian Gulf because he opposed the U.S. mission in Iraq. Petty Officer 3rd Class Pablo Eduardo Paredes will face charges of being absent without leave and missing his ship, the Navy said. Paredes, 23, refused to board the amphibious assault ship Bonhomme Richard when it left Dec. 6 for the Persian Gulf.
OPINION
January 2, 2005
As a former Woodstocker who still likes to think in utopian terms, I feel we may indeed need to reconsider the draft -- but in a different way: All high school grads, male and female, or upon reaching the age of 18, would be required to serve a two-year mandatory term (no deferments this time!). Each draftee would be given a choice to serve in the armed forces or in a domestic/international public service corps. We could give the world what it sorely needs -- human capital to help with infrastructures in Second and Third World countries and assist in times of disasters.
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