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Anton Chekhov

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Anton Chekhov is always with us in the theater. But this summer his work has been especially prevalent, serving as an inspirational model for such contemporary playwrights as Tracy Letts, Andrew Upton and Annie Baker. Having recently returned from a stifling hot busman's holiday in New York where I saw two productions of "Uncle Vanya," the Baker adaptation at Soho Rep and the Upton adaptation courtesy of the Sydney Theatre Company at the Lincoln Center Festival starring Cate Blanchett, I can't help pondering the meaning of this Chekhovian preponderance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Yes, he even falls with grace. Mikhail Baryshnikov doesn't get much opportunity to dance in "Man in a Case," a performance piece that has been adapted from the Anton Chekhov short stories "The Man in a Case" and "About Love. " The most he offers is a few moves wreathed in air quotes. But there's a point in the production, which opened Thursday at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica, when he slides down a steep flight of steps that is more revealing of his character than anything thus far in his portrayal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The month of March has seen an odd phenomenon in the theater scene in Orange and Los Angeles counties: Stagings of eight plays by Anton Chekhov have popped up--sort of an unheralded Chekhov festival--including "Uncle Vanya" at Cal State Fullerton, "The Three Sisters" at Orange Coast College and the one-act "The Brute" at Saddleback College. This year does not mark the birth or death of the Russian playwright; he was born in 1860 and died of tuberculosis in 1904.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Barbara Isenberg
NEW YORK - A few years ago, playwright Christopher Durang began wondering "what if" a bunch of Anton Chekhov's characters lived in Bucks County, Penn., as he did. And what if two of the older ones lived in a nice stone farmhouse like his for not just in midlife, as he does, but for their entire lives? "Even when I studied Chekhov's plays in college, I felt empathy for his older characters, often regretful and unhappy," says Durang. "Now that I'm older, I wanted to do something triggered by Chekhov but put in the present day. My farm house, which is on a little hill, made me think of a lot of the sets I've seen in 'The Seagull.'" The result of such musing is "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1995 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic.
W hile watching Louis Malle's "Vanya on 42nd Street"--an unusual filmed version of Anton Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" just released on video--I experienced an intense sensation that is probably familiar to anyone who has seen a well-acted Chekhov play. Somewhere in the first 20 minutes of the story, I felt as if I had been endowed with a fantastic power.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Nicholas Delbanco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Anton Chekhov A Brother's Memoir Mikhail Chekhov, translated from the Russian by Eugene Alper Palgrave Macmillan: 230 pp., $25 Anton Chekhov's life is well documented: When he died of consumption in 1904 at age 44, he was honored all over the world. His short stories, plays and journalism are still upheld as models of humane perception and imaginative compassion. That their short fiction is "Chekhovian" is the compliment we pay to contemporary masters such as Alice Munro and William Trevor.
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A winter's night, a traveler, a story: a classic combination, as the great Italian storyteller Italo Calvino reminded us. For untold centuries, long before the Internet, the television or the shopping mall, people have gathered round the fire on long dark nights and exchanged the gift of stories. Tales of awe and wonder, of course, are appropriate to the holiday season.
BOOKS
May 24, 1998 | SIMON KARLINSKY, Simon Karlinsky is the editor of "Anton Chekhov's Life and Thought: Selected Letters and Commentary," translated from the Russian by Michael Henry Heim in collaboration with Karlinsky
As the talent of Anton Chekhov blossomed and matured in the mid-1880s, his stories and plays presented Russian literary critics with a near-insuperable challenge. During the second half of the 19th century, Russian criticism was dominated by radical utilitarians who demanded that literature be a school of good morals and a catechism for social improvement.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 1998 | David Ives
David Ives's evening of six one-act comedies collectively titled "All in the Timing" opens on June 3 at the Geffen Playhouse in Westwood. The show, which portrays subjects like three chimpanzees attempting to write "Hamlet" and Philip Glass buying a loaf of bread, ran for more than 600 performances off-Broadway, has been seen abroad in many cities, and in the 1995-96 season was the most-produced play in America after Shakespeare productions.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"Ivanov," the play in which Anton Chekhov was still testing the formula for his dramatic breakthrough, is usually revived in somberly autumnal shades. So the opportunity to see the play thrillingly brought to life in brazen color, courtesy of director Bart DeLorenzo, is one that no serious aficionado of modern classics should pass up. A co-production between DeLorenzo's the Evidence Room and the Odyssey Theatre, where the show opened last weekend, this deliciously vivid, deliriously accelerated staging respects both the gravity and gaiety of Chekhov's 1889 play (nimbly translated by Paul Schmidt)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2013 | By Martin Tsai
"Hollywood Seagull" isn't the first movie adaptation of Anton Chekhov's "The Seagull. " Nor is novelist-turned-filmmaker Michael Guinzburg the first to think of updating the classic Russian play. The film's conceit of reimagining 19th century playwrights as modern-day filmmakers has likewise been beaten to the punch by Claude Miller's 2003 treatment of the same manuscript, "La Petite Lili. " Guinzburg's effort skews toward the old. He appoints the protagonist's frail grandfather - originally an uncle per Chekhov - as the narrator.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 2013 | By Hector Tobar
Welcome to Russia, Edward Snowden! Here's a disturbing Russian novel, just to give you a sense of what you've gotten yourself into. The NSA leaker, stuck in a legal limbo in Moscow's international airport for a month now, was able to meet a Russian lawyer for the first time today. The lawyer came bearing a gift : a copy of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's classic 1866 novel “Crime and Punishment.” Said novel, for the uninitiated (and it really is one of those books you have to read before you die)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Six months after her husband's death, Olga Knipper, famed actress and widow of Anton Chekhov, is gearing up to face an audience again. In a dimly lighted rehearsal hall in St. Petersburg, Russia, with two other actors, she prepares to resume her life onstage. Her monologue from "The Cherry Orchard," though, is not coming out right. She fears that grief has destroyed her capacity to feel. Outside a graver crisis is erupting. A march of workers ended in a massacre. Actors from this company may have been killed.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Could the theater artist of 2012 really be … Samuel Beckett? Well, the 1969 Nobel Prize winner had stiff competition this year from Anton Chekhov, dead for more than a hundred years but more alive than ever onstage. Chekhov's early play "Ivanov" received a sensational Bart DeLorenzo production at the Odyssey Theatre in April, and I caught "Uncle Vanya" twice last summer in New York, once at Soho Rep with a cast of offbeat luminaries directed by Sam Gold and once at New York City Center in a Sydney Theatre Company production starring the preternaturally luminous Cate Blanchett.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - Anton Chekhov is always with us in the theater. But this summer his work has been especially prevalent, serving as an inspirational model for such contemporary playwrights as Tracy Letts, Andrew Upton and Annie Baker. Having recently returned from a stifling hot busman's holiday in New York where I saw two productions of "Uncle Vanya," the Baker adaptation at Soho Rep and the Upton adaptation courtesy of the Sydney Theatre Company at the Lincoln Center Festival starring Cate Blanchett, I can't help pondering the meaning of this Chekhovian preponderance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
"Ivanov," the play in which Anton Chekhov was still testing the formula for his dramatic breakthrough, is usually revived in somberly autumnal shades. So the opportunity to see the play thrillingly brought to life in brazen color, courtesy of director Bart DeLorenzo, is one that no serious aficionado of modern classics should pass up. A co-production between DeLorenzo's the Evidence Room and the Odyssey Theatre, where the show opened last weekend, this deliciously vivid, deliriously accelerated staging respects both the gravity and gaiety of Chekhov's 1889 play (nimbly translated by Paul Schmidt)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1986
Why do the ads for "Wild Honey" call it "a comedy by Michael Frayn, from the play . . . by Anton Chekhov." When I saw the play three summers ago in London, it was billed as "by Anton Chekhov, in a version by Michael Frayn." Although I have a great respect for Frayn's talent, the story, characters and most of the dialogue were created by Chekhov. Although Frayn did substantial editing, focusing and rewriting, even he admitted (in his preface to the plays) that "any virtues must be credited towards Chekhov's account, not mine."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2010 | By Nicholas Delbanco, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Anton Chekhov A Brother's Memoir Mikhail Chekhov, translated from the Russian by Eugene Alper Palgrave Macmillan: 230 pp., $25 Anton Chekhov's life is well documented: When he died of consumption in 1904 at age 44, he was honored all over the world. His short stories, plays and journalism are still upheld as models of humane perception and imaginative compassion. That their short fiction is "Chekhovian" is the compliment we pay to contemporary masters such as Alice Munro and William Trevor.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2010
'Anton Chekhov's The Duel' MPAA rating: Unrated Running time: 1 hour, 35 minutes Playing: At Music Hall, Beverly Hills; Playhouse 7, Pasadena; Town Center 5, Encino; Westpark 8, Irvine
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