Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAnxiety Disorders
IN THE NEWS

Anxiety Disorders

HEALTH
March 1, 1999 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
They don't write checks in public because they fear people watching them write. They don't go shopping. They have problems with authority figures, so they are typically underemployed or unemployed. They don't visit doctors for the same reason, so they are rarely identified and treated. The mysterious illness that afflicts them is a syndrome called social anxiety disorder.
Advertisement
HEALTH
April 27, 1998
"Anxiety Disorders" A public service announcement produced by the National Institute of Mental Health 30 seconds In widespread release, television and radio This new PSA campaign brings much-needed attention to anxiety disorders, a group of illnesses that affects about 23 million Americans. The PSA features three scenarios depicting how someone with panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder or post-traumatic stress disorder might act in an otherwise normal situation.
HEALTH
September 29, 1997 | SHARI ROAN
www.nimh.nih.gov/anxiety People with anxiety disorders often find it difficult to reach out for help. Some people become so overwhelmed by feelings of fear and anxiety that they become housebound. That's why this new Web site is an important addition to the National Institute of Mental Health's arsenal of tools to help people with anxiety disorders.
NEWS
May 2, 1995
Feeling anxious or fearful? Wondering if you might need help? The New York-based Freedom From Fear--together with other national mental health advocacy groups--will host National Anxiety Disorders Screening Day on Wednesday at about 1,180 sites nationwide, including more than 70 sites in California.
NEWS
May 29, 1994 | MARY ESCH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ben Lazarus spent most of his adolescence hiding. He never dated, seldom spoke in class, and ate alone in the library, shunning the social clamor of the cafeteria. "I kept a low profile," Lazarus said. "I didn't really see myself as having a problem." It wasn't until his mother took him to Albany's Phobia and Anxiety Disorders Clinic in 1990 that Lazarus was diagnosed with social phobia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1994
A nationwide effort to heighten awareness about anxiety disorders comes to Orange County this week with a free screening day. The Neuropsychiatric Center at the UCI Medical Center will offer a free educational presentation and screening for anxiety disorders on Wednesday at 7 p.m., sponsored by the Anxiety Disorders Assn. of America, the Obsessive Compulsive Foundation and Freedom from Fear.
NEWS
December 2, 1990 | HEIDI NOLTE BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Thousands of Americans are too afraid to get into their cars, shop at the mall or even venture out of the house, worried they'll suffer a panic attack. "It's a horrible feeling," said Ann, a 51-year-old Richmond real estate agent. "I feel like I'm losing control. I feel like the world around me doesn't exist and I feel like I'm going to die." Ann, who asked that her last name be withheld, said the panic attacks began when she was about 8, but she was too afraid to tell anyone.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
It was a typical stressful situation--the kind experienced by people every day. Brent, an artist, then age 40, was in rush-hour traffic on the San Diego Freeway heading north from Irvine with just enough time to make his son's awards banquet in Los Alamitos. Traffic slid to a halt. Brent remembers the scene vividly. Two large trucks towered on either side of his car. He heard a traffic report describing a 12-car pileup ahead. He would arrive late for the banquet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1990 | SUSAN FAHLGREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Merrell Scott was afraid to leave her house. "When you have a panic attack, you feel like you're going to die. Your hands and feet get tingly, you feel nauseated, the room spins, you have hot and cold flashes. It's awful," said Scott, 35, who suffers from agoraphobia, the fear of open spaces. "For me, outside pressures or just anything can start it and once it starts, it just starts rolling and takes off." But she and other anxiety-prone worriers are finding help.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|