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NEWS
January 14, 1992
The "Frontline" of black-ruled countries, linked for so long by their proximity to--and disdain for--apartheid South Africa, meet Wednesday in the Zambian capital to elect a new chairman and also to ponder serious questions about their collective future. With apartheid and white-minority rule beginning to crumble in South Africa, the question these days is whether the Frontline still has a reason to exist. One by one, African countries are removing sanctions on Pretoria.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2011 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former U.S. Rep. Howard Wolpe, a Michigan Democrat who played a key role in the 1986 passage of the federal anti-apartheid act that imposed economic sanctions on South Africa, has died. He was 71. Wolpe, who had been ill with a heart condition, died Tuesday at his home in Saugatuck, Mich., said Ken Brock, a former staff member. As chairman of the Foreign Affairs subcommittee on Africa, Wolpe was a main sponsor of the Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act, which demanded the end of apartheid and mandated sanctions against South Africa for its system of white-minority rule.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 1988 | John Voland, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Repudiating a history of production in the apartheid regime, executives of the Cannon Film Group announced Tuesday that they would stop filming in South Africa and thus avoid the wrath of a coalition of film industry and political groups opposed to the policyof racial separation. "In support of the United Nations' call for the cultural boycott of South Africa," Cannon said in a prepared statement, "the executive committee of Cannon Film Group Inc.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
For Athol Fugard , the playwright's pilgrimage can be a long, tortuous slog. But the trek is less daunting and more companionable if that road happens to pass through L.A.'s Fountain Theatre . Since 2000, when the intimate Hollywood playhouse staged the Los Angeles premiere of Fugard's "The Road to Mecca," the 78-year-old South African playwright has regarded the Fountain as something of an artistic home away from home. It will be again starting Saturday, when the Fountain will host the U.S. premiere of Fugard's latest work, "The Train Driver," a succinct, one-act, two-character drama that deals with Fugard's pivotal theme of the last two decades: South Africa's quest to shake off the ghosts of apartheid's dehumanizing legacy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2008 | The Associated Press
Es'kia Mphahlele, 88, a politically active South African writer celebrated for his vivid autobiography about the hardships of apartheid, died Monday at a hospital near his home in Lebowakgomo, in northern South Africa, family friend Raks Seakhoa told the Associated Press. The cause of death was not given, but Seakhoa said in an interview Tuesday that the writer had been in poor health for some time.
OPINION
November 3, 2006 | David Goodman, DAVID GOODMAN is the author of "Fault Lines: Journeys Into the New South Africa," and the just-published "Static: Government Liars, Media Cheerleaders and the People Who Fight Back."
WHEN I WAS protesting apartheid as a college student in the 1980s, South African President P. W. Botha, who died Tuesday at the age of 90, was the embodiment of racist evil. But when my car broke down near his house in South Africa a decade ago, I was sufficiently brash and morbidly curious that I decided to call the "Great Crocodile" and invite myself over for tea. I was in South Africa in 1996 and 1997 researching a book about the country's transformation from apartheid.
NEWS
July 3, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As President Frederik W. de Klerk and black leader Nelson Mandela met separately with President Clinton in Washington on Friday, their negotiators joined forces back home to ram through formal approval of a 1994 election date. The maneuver by government and African National Congress negotiators, over the vociferous objections of key black and white opponents, set April 27 for South Africa's first multiracial elections.
NEWS
March 22, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cavernous courtroom was nearly empty, with only four spectators and reporters watching as a DNA expert patiently explained the techniques of his trade. Even the defendant, 32-year-old Moses Sithole, appeared bored. Smartly dressed in a double-breasted suit, he adjusted his gold-rimmed glasses and read a newspaper as the witness droned on. So goes the trial of the man accused of being South Africa's worst known serial killer.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The government on Thursday lifted its ban on "Witness to Apartheid," a documentary nominated for an Academy Award. The film, made by Kevin Harris of Johannesburg and Sharon Sopher of New York, portrays the impact of the country's continuing civil unrest on various South Africans and features such prominent anti-apartheid campaigners as Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu, the 1984 Nobel Peace laureate.
NEWS
August 4, 1985 | United Press International
The South African government agreed Friday to hold talks with three European foreign ministers to discuss concerns over 10 months of racial violence that has killed about 500 people. The move follows the European Economic Community's decision to recall all its ambassadors for consultation, an action that was joined Friday by Australia as a "gesture of protest" against apartheid.
WORLD
June 7, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon
At 60, he walks like an old man, hobbling slowly out of his room, sitting stiffly on a plastic chair in the house he grew up in, with its corrugated tin roof, cheap furniture and glass cabinet crowded with faded mementos. He absently touches his swollen right knee, the old soccer injury that cut short his career and sent him home to Atteridgeville and a life spent selling shoes in a sporting goods store. But here in the township outside Pretoria where he was born, he will always be a hero.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2009 | By Reed Johnson
Real Hollywood tough guys can wear Nike trainers or tasseled loafers. Tough guys -- the old-school variety, that is, as opposed to today's preening, pumped-up action heroes who yell out for a digital avatar when the going gets sticky -- don't bark their thoughts in drill-sergeant cadences. They speak them in low, self-assured tones, befitting their muscular résumés. Tough guys, at least those of a certain age, can be very mellow cats, sitting in the bar of the Carlyle Hotel, listening to jazz and munching peanuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2009 | Scott Kraft
Some two decades ago, as this newspaper's correspondent in South Africa, I watched apartheid crumble and Nelson Mandela walk free from prison. It was a reporter's dream, covering the final gasps of an unjust system that was vilified around the world. And it had all the ingredients of a wonderful story, with courageous and malevolent characters on both sides. "Endgame," a British docu-drama on PBS this Sunday night, is an ambitious effort to turn the events leading up to that historic moment into a political thriller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2008 | The Associated Press
Es'kia Mphahlele, 88, a politically active South African writer celebrated for his vivid autobiography about the hardships of apartheid, died Monday at a hospital near his home in Lebowakgomo, in northern South Africa, family friend Raks Seakhoa told the Associated Press. The cause of death was not given, but Seakhoa said in an interview Tuesday that the writer had been in poor health for some time.
OPINION
November 3, 2006 | David Goodman, DAVID GOODMAN is the author of "Fault Lines: Journeys Into the New South Africa," and the just-published "Static: Government Liars, Media Cheerleaders and the People Who Fight Back."
WHEN I WAS protesting apartheid as a college student in the 1980s, South African President P. W. Botha, who died Tuesday at the age of 90, was the embodiment of racist evil. But when my car broke down near his house in South Africa a decade ago, I was sufficiently brash and morbidly curious that I decided to call the "Great Crocodile" and invite myself over for tea. I was in South Africa in 1996 and 1997 researching a book about the country's transformation from apartheid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hilda Bernstein, 91, an anti-apartheid activist and author who was a founding member of the Federation of South African Women, the first nonracial women's organization in South Africa, died of heart failure Friday at her home in Cape Town, South Africa. Bernstein, whose husband was tried for treason along with Nelson Mandela, was born in London in 1915 and emigrated to South Africa in 1932, working in advertising, publishing and journalism.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1990 | PHILIPPA FLETCHER, REUTERS
Each time Abdullah Ibrahim sits down at the piano to play jazz, his South African audience gets a glimpse of life beyond apartheid. The sight--familiar enough in the clubs of New York--of the tall, willowy figure dressed in flowing white robes has been denied them for many years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hilda Bernstein, 91, an anti-apartheid activist and author who was a founding member of the Federation of South African Women, the first nonracial women's organization in South Africa, died of heart failure Friday at her home in Cape Town, South Africa. Bernstein, whose husband was tried for treason along with Nelson Mandela, was born in London in 1915 and emigrated to South Africa in 1932, working in advertising, publishing and journalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2004 | Ann M. Simmons and Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writers
Daniel Matemotja arrived in the United States with one goal in mind: Get a good education and return to his native South Africa -- as soon as the white minority government could be dislodged and replaced by black majority rule. That was almost 30 years ago. In the intervening years, Matemotja, 56, has become a doctor, built a family practice in Compton and raised three children.
WORLD
March 22, 2003 | Nita Lelyveld, Times Staff Writer
The final volume of the report of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission is 976 pages long and heavy to hold. Heavy, too, are its contents: the names of thousands of South Africans, followed by brief, chilling descriptions of how they were killed, tortured or left maimed or scarred in the three turbulent decades leading up to the country's first democratic election, in 1994. On Friday, the commission's chairman, retired Anglican Archbishop Desmond M.
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