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SCIENCE
July 18, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Great apes have a lot in common with Marcel Proust, it turns out. Their long-term memories can be provoked by the equivalent of dipping a madeleine in a cup of tea. In this case, chimpanzees and orangutans remembered how to find tools that would help them get a banana or frozen yogurt, three years after being exposed to the task just four times, according to a study published Thursday in the review Current Biology. The apes also were able to remember a similar scenario from two weeks earlier, even though it was presented only once, the researchers found.
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NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
Bart Simpson and Baby Milo are playmates -- kind of -- in a new collection of apparel and accessories that melds the cartoonish vibe of Japanese cult brand A Bathing Ape (aka BAPE) with 20th Century Fox  Television's first family of animation, "The Simpsons. " The collection, which can be seen on BAPE's website, includes key chains, baby bibs and snapback ball caps depicting BAPE's Baby Milo mascot peeking out from behind Bart Simpson, beer mugs, throw pillows and T-shirts featuring the whole Simpson clan piled on the family couch or crowding around a doughnut (again with Milo in the mix)
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SCIENCE
May 29, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Ever let out a groan, bang your fist or scratch your head in frustration when life didn't go your way? Maybe you were forced to wait in line for a restaurant table, or you raced to the movie theater and found the show sold out. Well, the same holds true for our closest living animal relative, the chimpanzee. In a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One , researchers concluded that chimps and bonobos both get emotional when life serves up bummers. A three-minute wait for food, or a surprise helping of boring old lettuce instead of delicious banana slices, can inspire an epic tantrum of moans, screams, body scratching and hand banging, according to Duke University researchers.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2013 | By Cara Mia DiMassa
APELDOORN, NETHERLANDS - Dozens of black-and-yellow squirrel monkeys scampered around us, some running above on high ropes, others swooping in close to us as we walked. This was one of the many delights of the Apenheul, a primate park in rural Netherlands where monkeys, apes and lemurs are allowed to run free. The squirrel monkeys hopped easily onto the arms and shoulders of park visitors, who snapped pictures of the spectacle with cameras and phones. Our daughters, ages 4 and 8, squealed.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2001
So Kevin Smith thinks that Tim Burton's ending for "Planet of the Apes" was lifted (Morning Report, Aug. 11). Well, it was, but not from Smith, from Pierre Boulle. The movie's ending is just about all that it has in common with Boulle's original novella, in which astronaut Ulysse Merou escapes the ape-world, makes it back to Earth and finds that Earth is now run by apes as well. DAVID JAMES Long Beach
OPINION
January 19, 2013
Responding to The Times' editorial on Wednesday, "Morsi's hateful speech," which condemned Egypt's president for a 2010 speech in which he attacked Zionists, UC Irvine historian Jon Wiener wrote in a letter published Friday : "Your editorial calling on Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi to apologize for describing Zionists as 'descendants of apes and pigs' is only half right. We are all descendants of apes, more or less. "Morsi is to be congratulated for embracing the theory of evolution at a time when so many of our own Christian leaders reject it. No apology is necessary there; it's the pigs that are the problem.
NEWS
February 28, 2013 | By Rosemary McClure
Armchair travelers and adventurer-seekers who dream of getting off the grid will find a taste of the exotic in a new trip being organized by Asia Transpacific Journeys called The Wild Jungles of Borneo . The April 8-21 trip will explore the Southeast Asian island's national parks and wildlife sanctuaries, known for their variety of species. The tour promises a chance to search for tigers, rhinos, elephants and leopards from treetop aerial walkways and to observe nocturnal wildlife and birds on a night safari.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Rise of the Planet of the Apes" does it right. Smart, fun and thoroughly enjoyable, it's a model summer diversion that entertains without insulting your intelligence. Adroitly blending the most modern technology with age-old story elements, it's also an origin story that answers the question that's been hanging in the air since 1968: How did it happen that apes rule? That year's Charlton Heston-starring "Planet of the Apes" (based on a novel by Pierre Boulle) posited a world where simians were in charge and people were in cages.
SCIENCE
May 15, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Scientists have added two species of ape and monkey to the evolutionary tree, filling in a 10-million-year gap in the fossil record from a period when apes and Old World monkeys diverged. Fossil specimens of jaws and teeth, collected by Ohio University researchers in the Rukwa Rift Basin of Tanzania, date the primates to about 25.2 million years ago. Each was probably  evolving separately by then, according to the scientists, whose work was published in the journal Nature. Rukwapithecus fleaglei was identified as a hominoid predecessor to the modern ape or chimpanzee, and Nsungwepithecus gunnelli was believed to be an early cercopithecoid, or Old World monkey, similar to a baboon or macaque.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2011 | Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
After this weekend's box-office receipts are tallied, "The Change-Up" will wish it could trade places with "Rise of the Planet of the Apes. " A prequel to the 1968 cult classic that shows how simians took over Earth, "Apes" is expected to swing to the top of the box office with a pretty good start of about $35 million, according to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys. "The Change-Up," an R-rated comedy about two men who accidentally switch bodies, is expected to bring in a modest $13 million to $15 million.
SCIENCE
August 21, 2013 | By Melissa Pandika
Although our human ancestors climbed down from the trees millions of years ago, our feet have retained the type of flexibility seen in today's tree-dwelling primates, new research shows. For about 80 years at least, scientists have been under the impression that human feet are special.  Studies comparing human and chimpanzee footprints in the 1930s suggested that human feet were much stiffer than those of other apes. Humans have arches in the mid-foot region, as well as rigid outer edges, leading scientists to conclude that our mid-foot regions weren't capable of touching the ground, unlike those of our ape relatives.
SCIENCE
July 18, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Great apes have a lot in common with Marcel Proust, it turns out. Their long-term memories can be provoked by the equivalent of dipping a madeleine in a cup of tea. In this case, chimpanzees and orangutans remembered how to find tools that would help them get a banana or frozen yogurt, three years after being exposed to the task just four times, according to a study published Thursday in the review Current Biology. The apes also were able to remember a similar scenario from two weeks earlier, even though it was presented only once, the researchers found.
SCIENCE
June 7, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
What do a chimpanzee, a bonobo and a toddler all have in common? They all use gestures to communicate. By studying hours of video of a female chimp named Panpanzee, a female bonobo named Panbanisha and a little girl with the initials GN, a team of psychologists hope to gain some insight into how spoken language evolved in humans. Skeletons can be fossilized, but language cannot, the researchers noted in a study published this week in Frontiers in Psychology. To figure out how it came to be, they looked for similarities between the three closely related species to infer ways that our common ancestor would have communicated more than 5 million years ago. Science and Health: Sign up for our email newsletter “This is one line of evidence for the gestural foundation of human language evolution,” the wrote.
SCIENCE
June 6, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
A 55-million-year-old fossil of a mouse-sized primate has been identified as a crucial evolutionary link in the chain that led to apes and humans. Four inches long, with a 5-inch tail and protruding eyes, Archicebus achilles probably thrived for millions of years during a warm period of Earth's history, feasting on insects and leaping around in canopies of trees that surrounded a tropical lake in what now is China, according to a report published online Wednesday by the journal Nature.
SCIENCE
May 29, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Ever let out a groan, bang your fist or scratch your head in frustration when life didn't go your way? Maybe you were forced to wait in line for a restaurant table, or you raced to the movie theater and found the show sold out. Well, the same holds true for our closest living animal relative, the chimpanzee. In a study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One , researchers concluded that chimps and bonobos both get emotional when life serves up bummers. A three-minute wait for food, or a surprise helping of boring old lettuce instead of delicious banana slices, can inspire an epic tantrum of moans, screams, body scratching and hand banging, according to Duke University researchers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of May 19 - 25, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES Invasion In this new series, wildlife ecologist Karl Malcolm leads a team on missions to stop dangerous animals that are encroaching on human territory. In the opener they're in Florida on the hunt for a giant Burmese python, the Nile monitor lizard and a small but deadly snail.
NEWS
August 13, 2001
Regarding "Monkeying Around With Sequel Ideas," Aug. 7: The "Planet of the Apes" sequels won't end yet. After that there may be Broadway musicals. In "The Apes and I," a schoolteacher from England travels by ship to Southeast Asia and is shipwrecked on an uncharted island ruled by orangutans. She whistles a happy tune while the king of the apes orders her to teach his many offspring. "Apes," Andrew Lloyd Webber's next musical, is about the chimps' annual ball, where one chimp is chosen to be reborn.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2011 | Noel Murray
Rise of the Planet of the Apes 20th Century Fox, $29.98; Blu-ray, $39.99 -- One of the happiest surprises of 2011, the prequel "Rise of the Planet of the Apes" doesn't just provide an explanation for how the humans of Earth fell to simian rule; it tells its own thrilling and unexpectedly emotional story about a chimpanzee named Caesar (played in motion-capture by Andy Serkis), who develops superior intelligence and uses it to lead a group of imprisoned apes on a rampage through San Francisco.
SCIENCE
May 15, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
Scientists have added two species of ape and monkey to the evolutionary tree, filling in a 10-million-year gap in the fossil record from a period when apes and Old World monkeys diverged. Fossil specimens of jaws and teeth, collected by Ohio University researchers in the Rukwa Rift Basin of Tanzania, date the primates to about 25.2 million years ago. Each was probably  evolving separately by then, according to the scientists, whose work was published in the journal Nature. Rukwapithecus fleaglei was identified as a hominoid predecessor to the modern ape or chimpanzee, and Nsungwepithecus gunnelli was believed to be an early cercopithecoid, or Old World monkey, similar to a baboon or macaque.
SCIENCE
March 20, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
A new United Nations report estimates that roughly 3,000 great apes are taken from the wild every year as part of an illegal international trade that is growing increasingly sophisticated. The report, “Stolen Apes,” calls for greater law enforcement and more investigations into the organized trafficking of chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos and orangutans. Capture in the wild is often a byproduct of land clearance or bushmeat hunting. But the report found evidence that illicit trade had shifted “to a more sophisticated business driven by demand from international markets.” The authors cited orders from zoos and private individuals in Asia that led to the export under falsified permits of more than 130 chimpanzees and 10 gorillas from Guinea, “an enterprise that requires a coordinated trading network through Central and West Africa.” Law enforcement is virtually nonexistent.
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