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Apj Abdul Kalam

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WORLD
July 1, 2002 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choosing a president is India's way of putting its best face forward, and the likely election of a national hero known as the Missile Man sends a message to the world. India's Parliament and state assemblies are expected to vote on the largely ceremonial post in mid-July, and the power brokers appear to have settled on their candidate: A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, 71, the father of India's nuclear missile program.
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WORLD
July 1, 2002 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choosing a president is India's way of putting its best face forward, and the likely election of a national hero known as the Missile Man sends a message to the world. India's Parliament and state assemblies are expected to vote on the largely ceremonial post in mid-July, and the power brokers appear to have settled on their candidate: A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, 71, the father of India's nuclear missile program.
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WORLD
October 20, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Indian government has deferred the hanging of its most notorious criminal, Mohammed Afzal, convicted for his role in the December 2001 attack on Parliament that killed 14 people. A Home Ministry spokesman said the delay of the execution scheduled today was required to give President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam time to consider a clemency petition. Afzal, a Kashmiri Muslim, is the only person condemned to death for the attack on Parliament.
WORLD
August 11, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
An Indian minister implicated in the killings of thousands of Sikhs after the assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi in 1984 resigned after the current prime minister pledged to further investigate. Jagdish Tytler, the minister of state for overseas Indian affairs, told reporters, "I want my name to be cleared." Tytler was implicated by a government commission that investigated the massacres. The minister's resignation was accepted by President A.P.J.
WORLD
July 26, 2002 | From Associated Press
A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, a missile scientist who advocates nuclear weapons as a war deterrent, was sworn in as India's president Thursday. In his acceptance speech, Kalam said India should brace itself to face the growing threats posed by terrorism, internal conflicts and unemployment. Kalam was elected July 18.
WORLD
July 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
A missile scientist who advocates nuclear weapons as a war deterrent was elected India's ceremonial president Thursday. A.P.J. Abdul Kalam won 89.58% of the votes cast by 4,896 members of Parliament and state legislatures. The only other candidate was Lakshmi Sehgal, an 87-year-old woman proposed by leftist parties. Although born to Muslim parents, Kalam, 71, does not describe himself as Muslim. He reads Hindu scriptures each day and is a vegetarian.
OPINION
March 1, 2007
Re "Film on an India pogrom boycotted," Feb. 25 Having lived in India for several years as an expatriate, I have to say I am shocked by The Times' India coverage. Believe me, I have been to several countries in the Middle East and in the neighborhood of India. Indians -- who are majority Hindu -- are the most tolerant people on this planet when it comes to religion. The Times tries to paint the picture otherwise. Just note that the president of India is a Muslim (A.P.J. Abdul Kalam)
OPINION
August 16, 2002
The president of India plays a largely ceremonial role, subordinate to the prime minister, but a smart politician can create power from symbolism. The new occupant of the office, A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, displayed that skill in picking a state torn by religious rioting for his first official visit, signaling his concern for the nation's Muslim minority. More than 1,000 people, most of them Muslims, were killed in riots in the western state of Gujarat in February and March.
WORLD
May 17, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Italian-born Sonia Gandhi plans to be sworn in as India's prime minister this week even as Hindu nationalists threaten to launch street protests if she becomes the country's leader. Gandhi's Congress Party and its allies elected her leader of an alliance that will form the core of a new government, one of her top party officials, Manmohan Singh, told reporters here Sunday. Gandhi is set to visit Indian President A.P.J.
WORLD
May 23, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh's new coalition government took power Saturday, promising more money for social programs and more taxes to pay for them. Singh, India's first Sikh prime minister, was sworn in by President A.P.J. Abdul Kalam, the Muslim father of the country's nuclear missile program.
WORLD
May 18, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
India's main stock exchange suffered its worst crash ever Monday as fears that economic reforms may stall under Sonia Gandhi's incoming government set off panicked selling. Financial markets fell as much as 17% before recovering some of their losses after government institutions reportedly bought shares.
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