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BUSINESS
September 5, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Comcast Corp. is appealing a Federal Communications Commission ruling that the company is improperly blocking customers' Web traffic, triggering a legal battle that could determine the extent of the government's authority to regulate the Internet. Comcast challenged the decision in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The Comcast case arose from complaints by users of a type of file-sharing software often used to download large data files, usually video.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
April 11, 2014 | By Alice Short
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Two of the top destinations on a recent trip to Charleston - Ft. Sumter and the Confederacy's H. L. Hunley submarine - transcend the label of "Civil War attraction. " These sites appeal to students of U.S. history, to devotees of military archives and to those who value peace over war. After a 30-minute ferry trip from the city to the man-made island that is the site of Ft. Sumter, my tour group encountered park ranger Dennis Birr, who proved to be a combination of historian, carnival barker and motivational speaker.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2001 | TWILA DECKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying he wanted to do the right thing, the man convicted of killing Bill Cosby's only son, Ennis, has written a letter to the California attorney general's office confessing to the crime and asking that his 1998 appeal be dropped. "It is based on falsehood and deceit. I am guilty and I want to do the right thing," Mikail Markhasev, 22, wrote in the letter. "More than anything, I want to apologize to the victim's family.
SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Camarillo and Newbury Park have filed appeals with the CIF Southern Section challenging their placement in a new league for the coming sports season. Each is citing competitive equity concerns. Both schools would be placed in a new football league with Oaks Christian, St. Bonaventure, Thousand Oaks and Westlake.   Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
NEWS
December 24, 2000 | MAURA DOLAN and MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Only rarely does a judge in a criminal case overturn the verdict reached by jurors in her own courtroom. Still rarer is the judge who admits to committing an error so serious it taints a verdict. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Connor did both Friday night in an extraordinary ruling that overturned the convictions of three Rampart Division police officers, impressing legal scholars with both her tightly reasoned legal arguments and her unusual candor.
NATIONAL
February 24, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court has turned down a pair of 2nd Amendment appeals lodged by the National Rifle Assn., keeping in place laws that restrict those under 21 years old from buying or carrying a handgun. Without comment, the justices dismissed claims by NRA attorneys who argued limits on those who are 18 to 20 infringe the “fundamental right” to have firearms for self-defense. In one case, the court refused to hear a challenge to a 1968 federal law that bars federally licensed gun dealers from selling handguns to those who are under 21. Sales of shotguns or rifles are permitted to those who are 18 or older, however.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
In a big win for a little fish, a federal appeals court Thursday upheld delta smelt protections that have cut deliveries of Northern California water to the Southland and the San Joaquin Valley. A panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals concluded in a 2-1 decision that a number of environmental provisions that federal and state water contractors have disputed as ill-founded were in fact justified. In effect, the court backed pumping limits. Written by Judge Jay S. Bybee, a George W. Bush appointee, the opinion is a major blow to the agricultural and urban agencies that have spent years challenging endangered species protections that have curbed water exports from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.
SPORTS
April 3, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Camarillo and Newbury Park have filed appeals with the CIF Southern Section challenging their placement in a new league for the coming sports season. Each is citing competitive equity concerns. Both schools would be placed in a new football league with Oaks Christian, St. Bonaventure, Thousand Oaks and Westlake.   Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik and John Horn, Los Angeles Times
When the Motion Picture Assn. of America voted to uphold the R rating for the documentary "Bully" several weeks ago, the film's distributor, Harvey Weinstein, kicked up a dust storm of protest and publicity. But it's not just Weinstein keeping the appeals board busy these days — the organization is facing a significant increase in the number of filmmakers seeking to overturn the initial ratings for their movies. The MPAA, which administers the ratings system via its Classification and Rating Administration, has already heard eight appeals for films scheduled for release this year.
NEWS
November 12, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Senate Republicans blocked another of President Obama's nominees to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, the latest chapter in a long-running battle between the parties over seats on the influential court. The 56 to 41 vote for Cornelia "Nina" Pillard, a Georgetown law professor, was shy of the 60 needed to end a Republican filibuster. One senator voted present. Pillard was one of three nominees Obama announced in June to fill out the court, considered second only to the U.S. Supreme Court in its importance in the judicial branch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2014 | By Anh Do
A San Gabriel Valley couple who moved to Qatar to help the tiny country ready itself for hosting the 2020 World Cup games were sentenced Thursday to three years in prison for the death of their adopted daughter, a verdict that stunned those who have followed the case. Matthew and Grace Huang have been detained in the country's capital, Doha, for nearly a year on charges they murdered the girl - one of three children they adopted from Africa. The couple contend Gloria, 8, died from an eating disorder.
NEWS
March 26, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
Detroit's efforts to once again become a vibrant and self-sustaining city has gained some cachet with L.A. residents, says Detroit native Tiffany Allison. She sees that with her jewelry line,  Detroit Trash . She is the granddaughter of an antiques dealer and learned from him the value of lots of tiny items, "little bits of history," as she calls them. They include Masonic star pendants from a jewelry store that burned down, keys to auto workers' lockers and metal ID tags for the workers' tools, high school class rings, carnival prizes and miniature license plates.
SPORTS
March 26, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Northwestern University football players have the right to form a union, a regional director of the National Labor Relations Board ruled Wednesday, setting the stage for potential dramatic change to the college sports landscape. Peter Sung Ohr, in Chicago, ruled that "players receiving scholarships from the employer are 'employees'" and ordered that an election be conducted to determine whether Northwestern players wanted representation by the College Athletes Players Assn. for the purposes of collective bargaining.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
A Federal Reserve rule allowing banks to charge retailers 21 cents to process debit-card transactions has been upheld by a federal appeals panel, a blow to big merchants such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Target Corp. A lower court judge invalidated the fee cap in July, ruling that the Fed's formula included costs that weren't allowed under the Dodd-Frank regulatory reforms that Congress passed in the aftermath of the financial crisis. But in a ruling Friday for a three-judge panel, Judge David Tatel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington said the central bank's rules “generally rest on reasonable constructions of the statute.” GAS: See latest prices in Southland, nation Merchants, who had argued that they were entitled to a lower cap, expressed disappointment, while financial firms said they were relieved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Law enforcement in California may continue to collect DNA from people arrested for felonies - even if they are never formally charged - and store the genetic profiles in a criminal database, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday. An 11-judge panel of the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a district court decision that refused to shut down the state's practice of swabbing individuals for DNA upon arrest. The 9th Circuit said California's practice was "clearly" constitutional under a Supreme Court decision last year that upheld a similar, but narrower, program in Maryland.
OPINION
March 18, 2014 | By K.C. Cole
What's wrong with this picture? Exonerations of wrongly convicted prisoners are at an all-time high. Last month, the governor of Washington put executions on hold because, since 1981, when the state last updated its capital punishment laws, a majority of the 32 death sentences that were imposed were overturned. More than a dozen other states have also called a halt to executions, for various reasons. And yet, three former California governors - George Deukmejian, Pete Wilson and Gray Davis - are urging the state to speed up a clearly flawed process of deciding who's to die. Their approach could theoretically limit the state appeals process, which now generally takes 12 to 15 years, to five years.
SPORTS
May 8, 2013 | By Jim Peltz
An appeals board sided with Joe Gibbs Racing on Wednesday and substantially reduced penalties levied against the team for having an illegal part in Matt Kenseth's engine when Kenseth won at Kansas Speedway last month. Kenseth initially was stripped of 50 Sprint Cup Series championship points, but the three-member National Stock Car Racing Appeals Panel reduced the penalty to 12 points. That lifted Kenseth back up to fourth from 11th in the Sprint Cup title standings. In addition, Kenseth crew chief Jason Ratcliff saw his suspension pared to one race from six, although a $200,000 fine against Ratcliff was left intact.
BUSINESS
December 3, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
Herbalife Ltd. said a Belgian appeals court has overturned a lower court finding that the company operated an unlawful pyramid scheme. Critics of the Los Angeles nutritional products company had said the 2011 ruling in Belgium was evidence that the company improperly rewards its independent sales people for recruiting others into the business. Herbalife said in a statement that a Belgian appeals court ruled that the company's sales model "is in full compliance with the law. " PHOTOS: Top 10 Southern California companies "Herbalife always believed that the first judgment contained factual errors and was based on misinterpretations of its direct-selling sales method, and was confident that the original judgment would be overturned on appeal," Herbalife said in a statement Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Gale Holland
The developer of a skid row apartment building that houses recovering alcoholics and drug addicts said Friday he would appeal a zoning decision that denied a beer and wine permit for a restaurant planned for the ground floor of the complex. Mike Alvidrez, executive director of Skid Row Housing Trust, said the planned restaurant, a former food truck called Great Balls on Tires, could not open with its present business plan unless it gets the permit to operate on the ground floor of the six-story New Genesis Apartments.
SCIENCE
March 14, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A California appeals court has sided with landowners fighting the state over test drilling for a proposed water tunnel system in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. In a 2-1 decision, an appeals panel ruled Thursday that the state needed to go through the eminent domain process to gain access to private property on which it wanted to take soil samples and conduct environmental surveys. The testing is necessary for the design and construction of two 30-mile tunnels that the state proposes to build as part of a delta replumbing project.
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