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March 2, 2014
Re "Swift LAFD hiring cutoff limits pool," Feb. 27 In 2011, Los Angeles voters passed Measure Q, which substantially changed civil service rules for the city. Measure Q eliminated a charter provision requiring the examination process, which includes interviews, to be open to all qualified applicants. The League of Women Voters of Los Angeles opposed Measure Q because of this change. Efficiency should not be allowed to trump fairness and merit in hiring. A "first applications submitted" policy with a 60-second cutoff is not fair to the applicants, who had no idea that their futures depended on being ready to hit the "send" button right at 8 a.m. It is also not fair to Los Angeles residents, who want their Fire Department to hire the best-qualified applicants.
October 27, 1997 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
In California, phlebotomists who draw blood for lab testing must be trained and issued a certificate by the training physician or clinical laboratory bioanalyst in charge of the program, according to state regulations, or they can take state-approved college or university courses or other approved training programs. Applicants to the school programs are advised to ask to see the school's approval letter from the state of California.
September 18, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
United Colors of Benetton has a habit of launching controversial ads. Remember the campaign last year showing world leaders such as President Obama and the pope lip-locked with each other? This time, the clothing brand is focusing on the unemployed - specifically those younger than 30. Its newest ad campaign will feature portraits of suit-clad young people without jobs who also aren't in school or training. The company is also launching a competition dubbed “Unemployee of the Year,” inviting unemployed applicants ages 18 to 30 to submit proposals for projects to cause “concrete social impact in their community.” The hope?
July 4, 1985 | JERRY HICKS, Times Staff Writer
On a Saturday morning last month at a Holiday Inn on the outskirts of Omaha, Neb., Julie Kearns and Debby Simmons were passing out written examinations to 67 area residents who wanted to be police officers. Except they didn't want to be police officers in Omaha. They wanted to work in Orange County, Calif. Kearns and Simmons are Orange County sheriff's deputies. The applicants had responded to newspaper ads that Sheriff Brad Gates had run in the Omaha and Lincoln, Neb., newspapers: " . . .
Position: Island caretaker. Duties: Lazing around Australia's Great Barrier Reef for six months. Salary: $100,000. It sounds too good to be true, but it's for real. Billing it the "Best Job in the World," Queensland state tourism officials say they are seeking one lucky person to spend six months on Hamilton Island, while promoting the destination on a blog. Within 24 hours, more than 200,000 prospective applicants had clicked onto the website While the advertisement is a publicity stunt by tourism officials, the job is genuine.
March 14, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER
Female students at College of the Canyons are being offered two scholarships, one for $500 and the other for $800 to $1,000. The $500 scholarship is being awarded by Delta Gamma Society International, ETA RHO Chapter. Applicants for this scholarship must be sophomores majoring in English. Other criteria include scholastic achievement, letters of reference and school and community activities. A written essay is also required. The deadline for this scholarship is April 1, 1993.
November 3, 1985 | Andy Rose
A combination of cash and sweat can translate into affordable homes for people with moderate to low incomes through a program offered by the Civic Center Barrio Housing Corp. The organization helped 20 families complete construction of homes on Raitt Street last January. A second phase of the owner-builder projects is now ready to begin and organizers are inviting applications for 21 homes.
March 7, 2013 | By Shan Li
Despite an improving economy, employers are waiting longer to fill job openings in their companies even when they receive many applications to a vacancy. Employers now take an average of 23 business days to hire someone for a position, more than a week longer than the 15 days it took in 2009, according to a study conducted by University of Chicago and University of Maryland economists cited by the New York Times. The news is not exactly new. Corporate profits are soaring, but with millions still out of work and an unemployment rate at 7.9%, companies feel little incentive to give raises or hire new workers.
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