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Appointments

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Abby Sewell and Jack Dolan
Los Angeles County supervisors are slated to appoint a new acting head in the assessor's office, which has been rocked by allegations that Assessor John Noguez and others traded bribes for lower property tax bills. Noguez, who was elected assessor in 2010, still officially holds the top position but has been on paid leave for more than a year since the district attorney opened an investigation that led to charges against him, one of his top aides and a tax consultant. Noguez is charged with 30 felony counts, including accepting bribes, perjury and misappropriation of public funds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Seeking to assuage concerns about management stability at Digital Domain, the new owners of the struggling visual effects company announced promotions of two veteran executives. Following the recent resignation of the respected Ed Ulbrich as chief executive officer, the Venice-based studio, which now goes by the name Digital Domain 3.0, said Monday it has promoted Terry Clotiaux to president of its feature film production division and Rich Flier to president of its advertising and games division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Kim A. Wilcox, a former top official at Michigan State University, was appointed as the ninth chancellor of UC Riverside at a special meeting of the UC Board of Regents on Thursday. The board voted unanimously for the appointment, with regents praising Wilcox's commitment to top-tier research and student diversity. But his compensation of $354,000 drew strong objections from Gov. Jerry Brown, who questioned the propriety of such a salary when so many in California and elsewhere are struggling.
WORLD
August 4, 2013 | By Batsheva Sobelman
JERUSALEM -- When Stanley Fischer announced in January that he planned to step down from his post as governor of the Bank of Israel, commentators suggested that replacing the iconic economist credited with the country's economic performance could be a challenge -- but no one thought it would be so difficult, or dramatic. After two candidates graciously accepted the prestigious nomination only to back out under graceless circumstances, the issue is fast becoming a public and political fiasco, raising questions about government judgment and chronic procedural problems in top public appointments.  The first, Yakov Frenkel , who already filled the post in the 1990s, withdrew his candidacy after allegations arose of a shoplifting incident seven years earlier at the Hong-Kong airport's duty-free shop.  The second veteran economist, Leonardo Leiderman, cited "personal reasons" for his withdrawal amid local press murmurs of a past sexual harassment claim . The appointments, made by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Finance Minister Yair Lapid, were subject to the approval of an advisory committee on senior positions headed by a retired Supreme Court justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Gov. Jerry Brown has appointed film industry veteran Eve Honthaner as deputy director of the California Film Commission to help lead its efforts to retain and grow movie, TV and commercial production in the state, the group said Monday.  Honthaner, who joined the commission as a consultant in February, is replacing Jim Fitzpatrick, who retired last year. Her duties include managing film-permitting operations, troubleshooting production issues, working with regional film offices and supporting marketing and outreach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2013
During a meeting interrupted by protesters, t he UC regents Thursday confirmed U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security  Janet Napolitano  as the next president of the 10-campus system. Times education writer Larry Gordon will join L.A. Live at 9 a.m. Friday to discuss two high-profile appointments by the University of California: the naming of Napolitano as the new president and the confirmation of Sadia Saifuddin as the first Muslim to be named a student regent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Laura J. Nelson
Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Thursday appointed three Los Angeles representatives to the board of the county's transportation agency, one of the biggest decisions the new mayor has made so far that will influence his administration's transportation projects. Garcetti's appointees to the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority are Los Angeles City Council members Mike Bonin and Paul Krekorian and South Los Angeles housing advocate Jackie Dupont-Walker. As mayor, Garcetti automatically has a seat on the board.
WORLD
July 16, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO - Fear of a fresh wave of violence gripped Egypt on Tuesday as a new Cabinet was sworn in to try to stem years of economic turmoil and move the polarized nation beyond the Islamist-led government of deposed President Mohamed Morsi. Seven people were killed and more than 260 injured late Monday and early Tuesday when Morsi loyalists battled police on streets strewn with stones and burning garbage. The fighting followed last week's army attack on Islamists in front of the Republican Guard headquarters that killed at least 51 supporters of Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood movement.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Sanford Police Chief Cecil Smith was hired to lead the central Florida department just as it was thrust into the national spotlight by the George Zimmerman case. And this week, after a jury acquitted Zimmerman, sparking a new round of national protests, it fell to Smith to keep the peace in town. The previous chief had been fired by city commissioners for failing to arrest Zimmerman for the fatal shooting of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager, in February 2012. Soon after, protesters rallied online and in streets across the country for Zimmerman's arrest.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid asserted his determination to end the use of the filibuster to block presidential appointments Monday, saying the change was needed to “save the Senate from becoming obsolete.” “This is really a moment in history when circumstances dictate the need for change,” the Nevada Democrat said in a morning speech at the Center for American Progress, a liberal think tank. “All we want to do is what the Constitution says we should do. Filibusters are not part of the Constitution.” Reid's remarks represented a further escalation in his rhetoric in the dispute with the Senate's Republican minority over procedural maneuvers that have left a number of President Obama's choices to executive branch postings unconfirmed nearly a half year into his second term.
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