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April Glaspie

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February 5, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When April C. Glaspie was named U.S. ambassador to Iraq in 1987, she was, it seemed, a rising diplomatic star. Only 45, and one of a handful of U.S. experts on the Arab world, she was the first woman to head an American embassy in the Middle East. Today, Glaspie is a bureaucratic non-person. Although the State Department maintains that she is handling important special assignments, Glaspie is effectively being held incommunicado--forbidden to talk either to the press or to Congress.
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NEWS
June 28, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
APRIL IN MOGADISHU: Remember the rap against April Glaspie? That as U.S. ambassador to Iraq, she didn't stand up to Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein just before his troops invaded Kuwait? Well, what better way to save a career that's been nose-diving ever since than to face down a group of Somali warlords? Sources say Glaspie, now a U.N. political aide in Mogadishu, persuaded a dozen of them to disarm after the U.N. attack on warlord Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid. . . .
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NEWS
April 27, 1991 | Reuters
The State Department on Friday denied a broadcast report that April Glaspie, the ambassador to Iraq accused by some of failing to deter President Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait, is resigning. "She's not leaving. I talked to her this morning. She does intend to spend a year as a diplomat in residence at a U.S. university. This is a very common follow-on assignment for many returning ambassadors," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | ROGER SIMON
One of the services performed by Ross Perot in the recent election was to reintroduce the name April Glaspie to the American public. When Perot mentioned her in the final presidential debate, no doubt a fair number of citizens scratched their heads and tried to remember just who she was. They should not blame themselves. Glaspie was a reasonably obscure diplomat--except for one brief shining moment when she changed the course of world history.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
April Glaspie, the former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, will take a leave of absence for one year to teach at a university in the United States, the State Department said. Glaspie, 49, has been working on Persian Gulf matters at the State Department since leaving Iraq shortly before the invasion of Kuwait last August. A department official said that Glaspie will then return to her diplomatic duties.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | ROGER SIMON
It was a turning point in history. Two people meet in a room for two hours. Afterward, a war is launched. A half-million Americans go to battle, billions of dollars are spent, tens of thousands of people die. So what happened in that room? What really happened in that two-hour meeting last year between Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and American Ambassador April Glaspie? We are just now finding out the truth of it. Secret cables have been released. Charges are flying. Defenses are being readied.
NEWS
June 28, 1993 | PAUL HOUSTON
APRIL IN MOGADISHU: Remember the rap against April Glaspie? That as U.S. ambassador to Iraq, she didn't stand up to Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein just before his troops invaded Kuwait? Well, what better way to save a career that's been nose-diving ever since than to face down a group of Somali warlords? Sources say Glaspie, now a U.N. political aide in Mogadishu, persuaded a dozen of them to disarm after the U.N. attack on warlord Gen. Mohammed Farah Aidid. . . .
NEWS
March 22, 1991 | Reuters
The U.S. ambassador to Iraq, April Glaspie, said Thursday that she believes President Saddam Hussein was convinced last July that the United States would go to war in the Persian Gulf if necessary but might have believed he could win. Glaspie's testimony to a House subcommittee was sharply challenged by the chairman, Rep. Lee Hamilton (D-Ind.), who cited a series of Administration statements to try to show that the United States gave conflicting signals.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | From Reuters
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein did not believe that U.S. envoy April Glaspie had given him a green light to seize Kuwait and expected a severe U.S. reaction, an Iraqi leader said in an interview published Thursday. Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Tarik Aziz told the Turkish daily Milliyet that he was present at a controversial meeting between Hussein and Glaspie just before the Aug. 2 invasion.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | ROGER SIMON
One of the services performed by Ross Perot in the recent election was to reintroduce the name April Glaspie to the American public. When Perot mentioned her in the final presidential debate, no doubt a fair number of citizens scratched their heads and tried to remember just who she was. They should not blame themselves. Glaspie was a reasonably obscure diplomat--except for one brief shining moment when she changed the course of world history.
NEWS
July 21, 1991 | ROGER SIMON
It was a turning point in history. Two people meet in a room for two hours. Afterward, a war is launched. A half-million Americans go to battle, billions of dollars are spent, tens of thousands of people die. So what happened in that room? What really happened in that two-hour meeting last year between Iraqi President Saddam Hussein and American Ambassador April Glaspie? We are just now finding out the truth of it. Secret cables have been released. Charges are flying. Defenses are being readied.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Key senators demanded Friday that Secretary of State James A. Baker III explain why the State Department did not set the record straight after April Glaspie, the former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, allegedly misled Congress about her talks with President Saddam Hussein shortly before his troops invaded Kuwait.
NEWS
July 12, 1991 | KAREN TUMULTY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Classified State Department cables show that April Glaspie, the former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, misled Congress in March when she insisted that she had warned President Saddam Hussein not to take military action against Kuwait, congressional sources said Thursday. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Claiborne Pell (D-R.I.) has sent a letter to Secretary of State James A. Baker III demanding an explanation for the inconsistency.
NEWS
May 31, 1991 | From Reuters
Iraqi President Saddam Hussein did not believe that U.S. envoy April Glaspie had given him a green light to seize Kuwait and expected a severe U.S. reaction, an Iraqi leader said in an interview published Thursday. Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Tarik Aziz told the Turkish daily Milliyet that he was present at a controversial meeting between Hussein and Glaspie just before the Aug. 2 invasion.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | Reuters
The State Department on Friday denied a broadcast report that April Glaspie, the ambassador to Iraq accused by some of failing to deter President Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait, is resigning. "She's not leaving. I talked to her this morning. She does intend to spend a year as a diplomat in residence at a U.S. university. This is a very common follow-on assignment for many returning ambassadors," said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
April Glaspie, the former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, will take a leave of absence for one year to teach at a university in the United States, the State Department said. Glaspie, 49, has been working on Persian Gulf matters at the State Department since leaving Iraq shortly before the invasion of Kuwait last August. A department official said that Glaspie will then return to her diplomatic duties.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Key senators demanded Friday that Secretary of State James A. Baker III explain why the State Department did not set the record straight after April Glaspie, the former U.S. ambassador to Iraq, allegedly misled Congress about her talks with President Saddam Hussein shortly before his troops invaded Kuwait.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ambassador April Glaspie, answering criticism that she led Saddam Hussein to think he could take Kuwait with impunity, broke months of public silence Wednesday and told Congress that she warned the Iraqi leader that the United States would come to the defense of its allies in the Persian Gulf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1991
Given the resources of the State Department, officials could have rewritten the history of civilization in eight months, let alone Glaspie's explanation of her memos to Saddam. I prefer the truth to the tooth fairy. MAX SHULDINER, Los Angeles
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