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August 22, 1993 | PETER H. KING
These are days of siege at the South Coast Air Quality Management District. The caissons of commerce, fresh from the workers' comp wars, are at the gates, carrying familiar ammunition. The AQMD, the war cries go, has become a drain on the economy, poisoning the California business climate. If something is not done, firms will flee en masse to less regulated environs. And so on. The campaign started quietly about a year ago, but now appears to be reaching full pitch.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2013 | By Jill Cowan and Anthony Clark Carpio, Los Angeles Times
Bowing to public pressure, air-quality regulators are floating a compromise on a proposed ban on wood-burning fire rings on beaches in Orange and Los Angeles counties. The proposal made public last week would soften the proposed ban by creating buffer zones between fire rings and homes and allowing for greater local control. Officials of the South Coast Air Quality Management District said they are working with Newport Beach on a test run of "alternative fuel" fire rings, which would probably run on propane or natural gas. Newport Beach officials have pushed to remove their city's rings on grounds they pose a health risk to nearby residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
The South Coast Air Quality Management District will consider on July 12 whether to give the city of Los Angeles additional time to install a $1-million system to burn off gas generated by Lopez Canyon Landfill, where two workers were overcome by gas earlier this year. However, the AQMD legal department has recommended that if the city gets an extension, the board add a warning that it will take the city to court if the city does not meet the new deadline. The city already had been given a six-month extension, which ends July 1. "We're not asking for them to be shut down immediately or at any time," said AQMD spokesman Bill Kelly.
NEWS
November 17, 1985 | RENATE ROBEY, Times Staff Writer
Partly because of protests from a San Dimas parents' group, the South Coast Air Quality Management District is considering amending regulations to require companies in four Southern California counties to get permits if they use cyanide tanks. But the Concerned Citizens Committee is unhappy because its target, a tool manufacturing company located next to an elementary school, will be allowed to continue operating the tanks that company officials say are essential to the business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1989
The business community has a single response to questions about its schemes to inaugurate enterprises, challenges to its management of existing enterprises, and demands to undo the consequences of abandoned enterprises. Garcia and Weinstein trot out the specter of "people and jobs" to slow much needed realignment of priorities in urban planning. Garcia and Weinstein and the industries they defend created the problems the AQMD and others are proposing to correct. Industry's noises evoking sympathy for displaced minorities will become persuasive only when it acknowledges culpability and sincerely participates in planning timely fixes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1987
South Coast Air Quality Management District investigators were unable Friday to pinpoint the source of an odorous cloud that worked its way across the Long Beach area and into Orange County on Thursday night. AQMD spokeswoman Jeanne Randol said the agency suspected that the smell originated at a refinery and might have resulted from the opening of a pressure valve.
NEWS
July 26, 1992
The San Gabriel Valley Commerce and Cities Consortium supports the findings of the Special Commission on Air Quality and the Economy. As a coalition of both the public and private sectors, we have a vested interest in the quality of life within the region--not only for ourselves, but for our children. However, we agree that there must be a balance created between the desire for clean air (and the speed by which we get it) and a sound, healthy economy. The professionals at AQMD are charged with improving air quality, period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1998
Re "Air Quality Fight Far From Over," editorial, Oct. 7: U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp never said that the South Coast Air Quality Management District could not or should not revise its clean air plan. State law requires AQMD to revise its clean air plan every three years, based on the latest scientific data and technology. The 1997 plan revised the 1994 plan, and we now are working on the year 2000 revision. The disputed measures proposed in 1994 were dropped or delayed in the 1997 plan because further analysis found them to be infeasible or otherwise unavailable.
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