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Aquaculture

NEWS
August 30, 1998 | DIANA MARCUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Add one more desert incongruity to the list. Already there is the Salton Sea, where the ranger at the state recreation area is promoting pleasure boating and water-skiing even as the lake makes headlines as an environmental disaster. Lush green fields of watermelon, squash and cantaloupe checkerboard with barren stretches of sand and rocks. Communities called resorts and spas are actually trailer parks where retirees stay inside all day running swamp coolers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1990 | KAREN McKEAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a small laboratory next to Southern California Edison's Ormond Beach generating plant in Oxnard, a marine researcher is trying to make abalone forget about sex and channel their energy toward growing faster. The lab has produced sexless abalone as part of an experiment being conducted by Tom McCormick of Berkeley and financed by the National Science Foundation.
NEWS
April 26, 1992 | DONALD J. FREDERICK, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Pump cold water up from the Pacific depths, and oysters, lobsters and salmon can thrive on a stretch of barren black lava coast in the tropics. The cold seawater is "nutrient-rich and free of pollutants, perfect for aquaculture," said Thomas H. Daniel, technical director of the Natural Energy Laboratory here on the West Coast of the island of Hawaii.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2002 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cindy Fernandez assumed that the Atlantic salmon she bought at her neighborhood supermarket came from fishing boats off the East Coast. She was surprised to learn it was farmed, grown in pens off the Chilean and Canadian coastlines. The word "farmed" never appeared on signs or labels with the farm-raised salmon, trout, catfish and shrimp at the grocery. "I would never have known," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ivar Southern's infatuation with the sea began as a toddler, when he watched his father tending lobster traps off Newport Beach. This week, he resumes his role in what has become a three-decade family legacy of lobster fishing off the Orange County coast. Southern loaded his boat Friday with traps near the Balboa Pavilion. By Wednesday, the start of the commercial lobster season, Southern will have scattered 280 traps along rocky outcroppings between Dana Point and Huntington Beach.
NEWS
August 3, 1997 | ELAINE KURTENBACH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The seas around this northeastern fishing port have been swept almost clean. Gone are the yellow croakers and cuttlefish. Even the usually plentiful sardines are in danger. Inside Zhang Rihuan's nets, however, gleams a shimmering harvest of sea bass. For Zhang, like many others in Yantai, is farming his fish.
NEWS
January 11, 1998 | JON MARCUS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
There was a time when all Boston Harbor seemed able to produce was stink and slime. Now they want to raise fish there. In the first such urban aquaculture project in the nation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientists are raising a tasty type of fish called red drum in a tiny trailer on an old Navy pier, using untreated harbor water--so far, with no ill effects.
NEWS
December 29, 1991 | WILLIAM C. HIDLAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A decade ago, this historic port, the easternmost city in the United States, was a picture of desolation. One Maine tour guide said it had "a haunting, end-of-the-world feel." Most storefronts downtown were boarded up, and a Maine humorist joked that Eastport's biggest event was its empty-building festival. The once-thriving sardine industry was virtually dead, its canneries crumbling. Eastport's largest employer had laid off 175 workers, and panic set in.
NEWS
July 1, 2000 | REX W. HUPPKE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jim Bradley emerges from a humid warehouse, escaping the unmistakable scent of fish and welcoming an early spring breeze. The son of a son of a farmer turns to a dilapidated barn, remnants of the family hog farming operation. "That," he said, "is our house of broken dreams." Behind him, the new warehouse is gurgling, its giant water tanks nurturing the fish that are now his livelihood. "Water farming," he said, shaking his head. "Who would have thought?"
FOOD
July 21, 2011 | By Adam Yamaguchi and Zach Slobig, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Scrawled on the white board hung behind the bar at Noshi Sushi in Los Angeles, the word " otoro " (fatty tuna) beckons seafood lovers. For the connoisseur, this is the main attraction, the filet mignon of sushi. Atop a small mound of rice, a heavily marbled slice of fish sits precariously — so oily that it's on the verge of falling apart. With one bite, the exquisite cut of bluefin will melt into oblivion. Bluefin tuna may not be a household name, but its taste and texture are famous — and increasingly infamous — among sushi aficionados across the world.
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