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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1986 | STEPHEN J. SOLARZ, Stephen J. Solarz (D-N.Y.) is a member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee
Last February, in stirring scenes that will be remembered so long as men and women cherish freedom, the Filipino people cast off two decades of despotism and proudly reclaimed their democratic birthright. But today in Manila the talk is of coups and counter-revolution. Juan Ponce Enrile, President Corazon Aquino's minister of defense, has become more and more brazen in openly courting opponents of the government while supporters of the exiled Ferdinand Marcos noisily call for his return.
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BUSINESS
March 9, 1992 | From Reuters
The Philippine government's decision to settle out of court a bribery suit against Westinghouse over a nuclear power plant came under fresh attack over the weekend, with one newspaper calling it a "dirty deal." Legislators attacked President Corazon Aquino's decision to operate the mothballed plant, and anti-nuclear activists called it a "shameless midnight deal." At one time, Aquino's government had called the plant--near an earthquake fault line--unsafe.
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NEWS
October 24, 1986 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Stephen W. Bosworth made it clear Thursday that the United States stands firmly behind Philippine President Corazon Aquino in her dispute with Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile over how to handle the country's Communist insurgency. "There is no ambiguity in the U.S. position," Bosworth said in a speech here. "We support the government of President Corazon Aquino firmly, totally and unequivocally."
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ABBY TAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Philippines and the United States face an uphill fight to win approval of a military bases agreement that would allow continued American use of Subic Bay Naval Base for another decade. President Corazon Aquino's government appears unable to muster the required 16 votes in the 23-member Philippine Senate to get the bases treaty--signed Tuesday by Philippine Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus and U.S. Ambassador Frank Wisner at Malacanang Palace--ratified by Sept.
OPINION
May 20, 1990 | A. R. Magno, A. R. Magno is associate professor of political science at the University of the Philippines; he directed UP's research into alternative uses for the U.S. bases
All of Manila's 28 dailies bannered the news that the Philippines had served notice on the United States that the 43-year-old Military Bases Agreement would be terminated on Sept. 16, 1991. The move surprised most Filipinos, as it did the U.S. panel headed by special negotiator Richard L. Armitage. Even by the usual Philippine interpretation of the bases agreement, the notice of termination was not due until September this year.
NEWS
August 28, 1991 | ABBY TAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Philippines and the United States face an uphill fight to win approval of a military bases agreement that would allow continued American use of Subic Bay Naval Base for another decade. President Corazon Aquino's government appears unable to muster the required 16 votes in the 23-member Philippine Senate to get the bases treaty--signed Tuesday by Philippine Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus and U.S. Ambassador Frank Wisner at Malacanang Palace--ratified by Sept.
NEWS
January 22, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, renewing its support for Philippine President Corazon Aquino after the latest shake-up in the armed forces, said Thursday that the Manila government "has made important strides toward solving the daunting problems" it faces.
NEWS
February 29, 1988 | Associated Press
President Corazon Aquino said today she sent two relatives to meet Ferdinand Marcos in Hawaii, and her ousted predecessor said he wants to negotiate his return. Aquino said she is not ready to let Marcos come back, but a senator hinted that Marcos may be allowed to come home if he swears allegiance to the government and meets other terms. Presidential spokesman Teodoro Benigno told reporters that Aquino recently sent her uncle, Rep. Francisco Sumulong, and cousin, Rep.
NEWS
June 26, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Corazon Aquino has agreed to allow ousted ruler Ferdinand E. Marcos to return to the Philippines so that the government can try him on charges of stealing billions of dollars during his 20 years in power, a spokesman for her confirmed Saturday. It was the strongest indication yet that the Aquino government is willing to risk the security threat posed by Marcos' return to put him on trial.
NEWS
October 31, 1986
Between 8,000 and 10,000 Filipinos marched through Manila's Makati financial district in support of President Corazon Aquino's peace initiatives with Communist rebels. Yellow confetti poured from windows of office buildings festooned with ribbons and banners. Some marchers carried signs that read, "Give Peace a Chance." Another sign read "Rambo, Go to Hawaii," a suggestion that Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile, who has criticized Aquino, join ex-President Ferdinand E. Marcos in exile.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | From Associated Press
More than 20,000 protesters demanded Wednesday that President Corazon Aquino resign, in a rally that brought together leftists, rightists and former supporters of the Philippine leader. Speakers charged that Aquino betrayed the "people power revolution" that swept her into office on Feb. 25, 1986. The largest anti-government rally in years brought together former Aquino Administration officials, leftists and rightist supporters of the late President Ferdinand E. Marcos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1990 | WILLIAM C. REMPEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imelda Marcos, after negotiating directly with secret emissaries of the Philippine government, claimed through her Los Angeles attorneys Monday that Manila has agreed to drop its multibillion-dollar damage suit against her in exchange for 60% of whatever funds remain in various Hong Kong banks. Her claim was disputed by lawyers for the Philippines. U.S. District Judge Mariana R.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | From United Press International
The fugitive leader of mutinous soldiers announced Sunday a new campaign to "steadily wear down" President Corazon Aquino's government after last week's short-lived rebellion in the southern Philippines. The statement by renegade army Col. Gregorio (Gringo) Honasan was issued to news agencies hours after bombs exploded outside two government buildings in Manila. Officials said mutinous soldiers were trying to strike back after the defeat of army Col.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three international human rights organizations have issued reports criticizing President Corazon Aquino's government and the Philippine armed forces for widespread human rights abuses, including murder, torture and illegal arrest. Philippine officials say reports of such abuses have declined over the last two years. But they acknowledge that despite hundreds of cases, no member of the military or militia has been convicted of a human rights offense since Aquino took office in February, 1986.
NEWS
August 22, 1990 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nestor Ilarde's tale of terror is emblazoned on his jacket: "Iraq War Victim." Ilarde, a 35-year-old Philippine mechanic working in Kuwait, was caught in the middle when Iraq invaded Aug. 2. He saw three Egyptian friends shot to death, he had to walk 12 miles across the blazing desert when his car gave out and he abandoned all he owned to save his life. "Everything is lost," he said. "But I am alive."
OPINION
May 20, 1990 | A. R. Magno, A. R. Magno is associate professor of political science at the University of the Philippines; he directed UP's research into alternative uses for the U.S. bases
All of Manila's 28 dailies bannered the news that the Philippines had served notice on the United States that the 43-year-old Military Bases Agreement would be terminated on Sept. 16, 1991. The move surprised most Filipinos, as it did the U.S. panel headed by special negotiator Richard L. Armitage. Even by the usual Philippine interpretation of the bases agreement, the notice of termination was not due until September this year.
NEWS
July 8, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The United States said today it has barred former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos from leaving his exile in Hawaii because of concerns that he is trying to destabilize the Aquino government in Manila. State Department spokesman Charles E. Redman said U.S. laws give the Immigration and Naturalization Service authority to bar an alien from departing from the United States. "Such an order has been issued for Mr. Marcos," he told reporters.
NEWS
July 10, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A close friend of Philippine President Corazon Aquino was freed on bail Thursday and given almost unlimited travel rights after the Aquino government vouched that he would return to face trial on explosives charges stemming from his 1981 activities against ousted President Ferdinand E. Marcos. U.S. Magistrate Joan Brennan issued the unusual order freeing Steven E. Psinakis after one of Psinakis' friends signed over a $50,000 cashiers' check as bail.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | ROBIN WRIGHT and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration dispatched Deputy National Security Adviser Robert M. Gates to Manila on Wednesday after U.S. officials privately concluded that President Corazon Aquino's position is so fragile that she may not be able to survive in office through this year. Officially, White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater told reporters at a White House briefing that Gates' mission is "to convey to President Aquino President Bush's continuing strong commitment to democracy in the Philippines."
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the beginning of this century, when the United States acquired the Philippines from Spain, humorist Finley Peter Dunne summed up the American attitude toward its first overseas territory. "We propose f'r to l'arn ye the uses of liberty," Dunne wrote, as the fictitious Mr. Dooley. "We can't give ye any votes . . . but we'll threat ye th' way a father shud threat his childern if we have to break ivry bone in y'er bodies."
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