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NEWS
February 18, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hanan El-Farra's sister lives in Kuwait with her husband and four little girls. She also has family in Iraq and in the West Bank. "About a week ago, I wanted to kill myself," said the Palestinian-born American, who has had "broken nerves" since the Persian Gulf War began. "I was driving my car like a crazy (person), talking to myself, afraid to speak on the phone because of the FBI." However, she found the strength to tell herself, "OK. We have to live our lives. We have to do something."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of people lined the streets near the Federal Building on Saturday to protest U.S. aid to Israel and to garner support for Palestinian liberation. At 2 p.m, the crowd chanted, "Free Palestine," and waved signs calling for an end to the violence that some Palestinians in the United States said they doubt will end. Some said the recent surge in violence forced them to join the protest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2001 | NEDRA RHONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of people lined the streets near the Federal Building on Saturday to protest U.S. aid to Israel and to garner support for Palestinian liberation. At 2 p.m, the crowd chanted, "Free Palestine," and waved signs calling for an end to the violence that some Palestinians in the United States said they doubt will end. Some said the recent surge in violence forced them to join the protest.
NEWS
February 18, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hanan El-Farra's sister lives in Kuwait with her husband and four little girls. She also has family in Iraq and in the West Bank. "About a week ago, I wanted to kill myself," said the Palestinian-born American, who has had "broken nerves" since the Persian Gulf War began. "I was driving my car like a crazy (person), talking to myself, afraid to speak on the phone because of the FBI." However, she found the strength to tell herself, "OK. We have to live our lives. We have to do something."
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley said Monday there is no evidence that any organized effort is behind a series of bomb threats and an arson attack that have been directed against Arab-Americans in the city since the outbreak of the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein gained popularity in some Arab nations after U.S. troops arrived in the Middle East, but the Iraqi president is finding few oases of support among local Arab- and Iranian-American journalists. "Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait and it's wrong," said Joseph Haiek, publisher of the Glendale-based Arab-American monthly magazine The News Circle. "If you have a legitimate grievance, you work it out. You do not occupy and put down the dignity of an entire nation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1994
We do take exception to the second to last paragraph in an article by Tyler Marshall (April 14). In a report from Strasbourg dealing with a speech by PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat, he mentions Russian ultranationalist Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky was also present at the parliamentary assembly of the Council of Europe. He writes: "Despite what might appear to be shared anti-Jewish sentiments, the two (Arafat and Zhirinovsky) seemed to have little interest in each other." This is very misleading.
OPINION
October 22, 1989
Once more I read in your paper a letter from Jack Newman, president of the Regional Anti-Defamation League, listing all the hard-line Israeli reasons why Yasser Arafat shouldn't be granted a visa to address the United Nations (Oct. 17). There's an old adage that people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones. If Newman is going to tag Arafat as a terrorist for the criterion that he shouldn't enter the United States, then why in blue blazes has the U.S. allowed Menachem Begin (the leader of a terrorist organization that slaughtered 250 Palestinians at Deir Yassin)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1989
I was astonished to read Reich's column in which he inferred the Tibetans' intifada has not succeeded because of a lack of adequate media coverage or an enlightened occupation. May I remind Reich that the so-called "legions of reporters" have never been allowed to cover an actual confrontation between rock-throwing Palestinians and armed Israeli troops and settlers--only a cleansed aftermath. Indeed, it is doubtful that the Chinese ever stooped to disguise themselves as reporters as Israeli settlers have done to swoop down upon dissidents and perpetrate bloodshed.
OPINION
March 25, 2003
As the war in Iraq began last week, state and local leaders put police forces and emergency workers on alert against terrorist attacks. In Los Angeles, they also announced they would beef up their investigation and prosecution of hate crimes, a clear message that homeland security extends to Muslims and Arab Americans. The Los Angeles area has the largest population of Arab Americans in the country, a demographic feature that went little noticed in this polyglot region until the Sept.
NEWS
January 29, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley said Monday there is no evidence that any organized effort is behind a series of bomb threats and an arson attack that have been directed against Arab-Americans in the city since the outbreak of the Persian Gulf War.
NEWS
August 29, 1990 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saddam Hussein gained popularity in some Arab nations after U.S. troops arrived in the Middle East, but the Iraqi president is finding few oases of support among local Arab- and Iranian-American journalists. "Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait and it's wrong," said Joseph Haiek, publisher of the Glendale-based Arab-American monthly magazine The News Circle. "If you have a legitimate grievance, you work it out. You do not occupy and put down the dignity of an entire nation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2002 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The initial post-Sept. 11 violence against American Arabs and Muslims, or people mistaken for them, often took place in public spaces: on the street, at a convenience store, near a mosque. But some advocates of these groups say a quieter backlash also took place in people's homes--and they worry that it may still pose a threat. It can be a neighbor's hostility, an unwarranted eviction notice or a wild accusation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1990 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an open letter to President Bush, Ron Kovic--the highly decorated Vietnam War veteran turned disabled anti-war hero--called Wednesday for an immediate withdrawal of all U.S. troops sent overseas to counter Iraqi aggressors. Kovic, whose autobiography was the basis for the movie "Born on the Fourth of July," was met by several counterdemonstrators who burned an Iraqi flag, picketed the rally and called the former Marine sergeant a traitor to his country.
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