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WORLD
October 22, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - A key group of Arab states and Western nations, including the United States, urged the “moderate opposition” in Syria to attend peace talks aimed at ending the country's civil war, but underlined their insistence that Syrian President Bashar Assad could have no role in any new government formed as a result. “It is imperative that we try to get to the negotiating table and try to save the lives and save the existence of the state of Syria itself. The only alternative to a negotiated settlement is continued, if not increased, killing,” U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry said.
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WORLD
October 22, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - A key group of Arab states and Western nations, including the United States, urged the “moderate opposition” in Syria to attend peace talks aimed at ending the country's civil war, but underlined their insistence that Syrian President Bashar Assad could have no role in any new government formed as a result. “It is imperative that we try to get to the negotiating table and try to save the lives and save the existence of the state of Syria itself. The only alternative to a negotiated settlement is continued, if not increased, killing,” U.S. Secretary of State John F. Kerry said.
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WORLD
September 3, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi and Julia Damianova, Los Angeles Times
Arab countries are stepping up efforts to pry open Israel's nuclear program, according to letters by diplomats accompanying a new report by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The documents obtained by The Times reveal a behind-the-scenes battle between the West and developing countries over whether to place the Israeli nuclear program under international controls, as demanded by an Arab-sponsored resolution adopted by the IAEA's 151 member states last year. Israel said then that it would not comply "in any way" with the resolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
"He who makes a beast of himself," Samuel Johnson famously observed, "gets rid of the pain of being a man. " His subject is, of course, inebriation and the way that, in the derangement of the senses, we might escape, however briefly, what Lawrence Osborne calls "a loneliness that otherwise cannot be so easily dislodged. " And yet, if Osborne's delightfully idiosyncratic "The Wet and the Dry: A Drinker's Journey" has anything to tell us, it's that there is more to drinking than derangement, that it may lead to a transcendence more profound.
NEWS
October 27, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three days after brokering an important new step in the Middle East peace process, the Clinton administration Monday gave a not-so-subtle diplomatic shove to Arab states to support the accord, both politically and economically.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Raytheon Co., BAE Systems and rivals said they expected six Persian Gulf Arab states, including Saudi Arabia, to buy more military equipment such as missiles and drones this year amid local leaders' rising concern over Iran. Raytheon, BAE, Lockheed Martin Corp. and Boeing Co. are among 900 defense exhibitors at International Defense Exhibition being held this week in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates.
NEWS
March 27, 1990 | Reuters
Arab states said Monday they fully support Iraq against Western criticism of its execution of London-based journalist Farzad Bazoft after his conviction on spying charges. "The council (of the Arab League) proclaims its complete solidarity with Iraq in the defense of its sovereignty and national security," said a statement issued after a meeting of Arab ambassadors in Tunis.
WORLD
July 29, 2004 | From Reuters
Egypt and the Arab League tried to put the brakes on a campaign for sanctions against Sudan on Wednesday as the Sudanese government blamed rebels in the Darfur region for the humanitarian crisis there. But U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said that time was running out for the victims of the conflict and the international community should keep up the pressure on Khartoum. "It is not enough of an excuse to say, 'Well, we don't want to put sanctions on this regime.
NEWS
November 8, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If President Clinton decides on a military strike to punish Iraqi President Saddam Hussein for blocking U.N. weapons inspections, he might want at least verbal support from U.S. allies in the Arab world. If so, it may be hard to find. Although friendly Arab states like Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia may sympathize with the U.S. position in the dispute, believing that Hussein has been deliberately provocative, there has been only muted public backing for the United States and chief U.N.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The Iran Air office in downtown Kuwait recently underwent a face lift, an apt symbol of the improving relations between Iran and Kuwait and a foretaste, perhaps, of expanding trade and business links between the two countries. Such changes were unthinkable only a year ago, when Iran was firing Silkworm surface-to-surface missiles at vital Kuwaiti installations, and this tiny sheikdom in the northwest corner of the Persian Gulf anxiously placed half of its oil tanker fleet under a protective U.S.
WORLD
June 22, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Hezbollah's march into the Syrian civil war on behalf of President Bashar Assad is adding to tension along sectarian fault lines in a region increasingly roused by geopolitical maneuverings that are fueled by religious passions. Popular uprisings that overthrew secular autocrats in Egypt and other countries once enthralled Shiite and Sunni Muslims alike. But the replacement of fallen leaders by Islamist parties has further provoked the age-old vitriol between the sects, threatening to turn the Syrian battleground into a wider religious war. Hezbollah, long a proxy for Shiite-dominated Iran, is helping battle largely Sunni rebel forces seeking to overthrow Assad, a fellow ally of Iran whose Alawite faith is a spinoff of Shiite Islam.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2013 | By John Horn
Director Ziad Doueiri hoped his movie “The Attack” might start meaningful conversations about terrorism, especially in the Middle East, where the film is set. Instead, the Lebanese-born filmmaker has seen his drama banned in almost every Arab country, a consequence, he says, of filming in Israel. Doueiri, whose film premiered at the Telluride Film Festival last year, said “The Attack” was scheduled to roll out in nearly two dozen Arab countries in the weeks ahead of its U.S. premiere on June 21. But last week he said the League of Arab States, also known as the Arab League, asked all of its 22 member nations to boycott the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Mitchell Landsberg
The great Yogi Berra is said to have observed, "Predictions are difficult, particularly about the future" (or something very close to that). When UCLA history professor James Gelvin quoted Berra to that effect on Saturday, it served as a capstone to a wide-ranging discussion of the Middle East in the aftermath of the Arab Spring. Wait, scratch that. The term preferred by the panel of Mideast experts speaking at the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books was Arab Uprisings, not Arab Spring.
OPINION
March 24, 2013
Re "Israel needs a new map," Opinion, March 21 Ian S. Lustick suggests that early Israeli Zionist goal of building a "modern secular democracy" that would eventually exist in an Arab region that had also become modern and secular hasn't been met. Anyone who studies the history of Israel knows that it was built by the exigencies of political brutality, not a plan. The Russian Jews escaping the pogroms and the European Jews escaping Hitler had only one plan in mind: survival.
OPINION
June 23, 2012
Re "Two states for two peoples," Opinion, June 18 Israeli President Shimon Peres says the "defining moment" for his people is their exodus from Egypt "and journey to freedom in our homeland. " Similarly, he cites "the Pilgrims who sailed aboard the Mayflower" and "sought freedom in their new promised land. " Peoples define themselves by their own narratives. These two foundation myths are powerful ones for Jews and Americans. On Passover and on the Fourth of July, I myself celebrate these milestones that define my identity.
OPINION
March 1, 2012 | By Aaron David Miller
For the better part of the last century, three Arab states - Egypt, Iraq and Syria - dominated Middle East politics in matters of war and peacemaking and shaped the region's relations with the great powers. The kings of Jordan and Morocco - and, of course, Saudi Arabia (and the Persian Gulf states) when it came to oil - had their say too. But it was the three pseudo-republics, authoritarian military regimes really, that threw their collective weight around. Not anymore.
NEWS
April 23, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 22 members of the Arab League committed themselves Wednesday to fighting terrorism, by signing an accord designed to ensure that their governments will not tolerate or give support to groups or individuals mounting terrorist attacks in other Arab countries. "This treaty will allow Arab countries to shatter the networks of terrorism . . .
NEWS
December 5, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese have asked the Arab nations to suspend their boycott of trade with Israel, a move that brings Japan's Middle East policy in line with that of the rest of the industrial world and that could boost its potential role as a peacemaker in the region.
OPINION
November 13, 2011 | By Aaron David Miller
All Gaul was divided into three parts, Julius Caesar wrote in his "De Bello Gallico. " For America, the Arab world had been divided into two: adversarial and acquiescent Arab authoritarians. Until now. The last eight months have witnessed profound changes. The willing and unwilling Arab autocrats have gone or are going the way of the dodo. What remains — Arab states without strong and authoritative leaders and caught up in lengthy, messy transitions, monarchies trying to co-opt and preempt transformational change (Saudi Arabia, Morocco and Jordan)
WORLD
January 30, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
A wall of fear has come down. Across the Arab world, people living under the thumb of repressive leaders are rising up against the rulers who once seemed omnipotent. They are using the Internet to network and spread the word. They are watching themselves on satellite television. They are drawing strength from the hyperactive energy of the frustrated young people dismissed and discarded by their governments. It is a contagious spirit. "I lost all the fear when I saw people killed by cops during the demonstrations," said Ahmad Chibel, a 30-year-old technology consultant who took part in the protests that overthrew Tunisian strongman Zine el Abidine ben Ali. "I had courage when I saw people on the streets.
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