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WORLD
October 10, 2009 | Jeffrey Fleishman
The Arab world greeted President Obama's Nobel Peace Prize with praise for his efforts at reaching out to Muslims but also with frustration -- and sometimes sharp criticism -- that the president's eloquence and charisma have not forced dramatic change on the ground. Bloodshed continues in Iraq, Afghanistan drifts in violence and uncertainty, and talks to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict have stalled. Obama inspired the region in his Cairo address to Muslims in June, regarded as a wise and conciliatory gesture to erase the combative years of the Bush administration and mend relations with the Arab world.
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WORLD
November 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Rising expectations of newlyweds living in their own homes and broader use of family planning in certain parts of the Arab world have drastically changed population dynamics in the region, with women marrying later and having few children, the statistics firm Gapminder reported Friday. In a series of graphics compiled and posted on the company website, the sharp demographic trends in Tunisia and Libya are offered as examples of the shift away from early marriage and frequent childbirth in Arab nations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As change sweeps across the Arab world, there are a variety of lenses through which to examine these changes: religious, cultural, political, economic. Shereen El Feki has chosen a decidedly less conventional lens with her new new book “Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World” (Pantheon, $29), due out Tuesday. The book takes a close look at the sexual lives of men and women in the Middle East. Combining original research with first-person stories from housewives, young virgins, activists and sex therapists, “Sex and the Citadel” provides a detailed account of a veiled and sensitive aspect of Arab society.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2013 | By Susan King
The Arab Film Festival, which opens Friday at the Harmony Gold Theatre in Los Angeles and continues through Oct. 20, is the largest independent annual showcase of Arab films and filmmakers in the United States. Founded in San Francisco in 1996, the festival is marking its seventh edition in Los Angeles. Besides San Francisco and L.A., it also visits Berkeley, Oakland and San Diego. "Arab culture is a rich feast of cultures and textures, with many stories to tell," Jordan Elgrably, director of the Levantine Cultural Center, one of the local organizations supporting the festival, said in a statement.
WORLD
November 1, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Rising expectations of newlyweds living in their own homes and broader use of family planning in certain parts of the Arab world have drastically changed population dynamics in the region, with women marrying later and having few children, the statistics firm Gapminder reported Friday. In a series of graphics compiled and posted on the company website, the sharp demographic trends in Tunisia and Libya are offered as examples of the shift away from early marriage and frequent childbirth in Arab nations.
WORLD
June 26, 2011 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
Few countries are as active in courting international opinion as Israel. An entire ministry is devoted to a kind of global PR called hasbara , the Hebrew word for "explaining. " Israelis studiously track public opinion in the United States and Europe, and Israel's military has taken to using YouTube, Twitter and an army of bloggers to disseminate real-time updates around the world, sometimes in the middle of battle. But the public diplomacy campaign, which has largely focused on the West, has ignored the Arab world, which many in Israel have viewed as a lost cause.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2012 | By Morgen Witzel
"The Arab World Unbound: Tapping Into the Power of 350 Million Consumers" opens in a Hezbollah-controlled grocery shop in south Beirut, where people are drinking Red Bull. From there on, it just gets better and better. Most of us know the Middle East and North Africa only from what we see on our television screens and read in the newspapers. The daily tale of riots and protests, bombs and bullets can leave us feeling profoundly depressed about the entire region and its prospects.
WORLD
May 2, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
The austere image of a tall, turbaned man battling the West from a cave inspired young Islamist warriors for years. But when Osama bin Laden died, his virulent brand of jihad had been all but extinguished by the "Arab Spring" that found more potent and peaceful ways to reshape the world. Al Qaeda-inspired militants still roam the mountains of Yemen and along the dangerous coast of Somalia. For many Arabs, though, Bin Laden's appeal had waned in the lexicon of Facebook and Twitter; he had become akin to an oldies rock 'n' roll act, an antiquated icon in a new era of revolution.
OPINION
August 10, 2013 | Doyle McManus
The "Arab Spring" may not have succeeded in bringing democracy to the Middle East. But it has provided powerful evidence of a different phenomenon: the illusion of U.S. influence over governments we once considered our clients. Take Egypt. Before 2011, the Bush and Obama administrations tried to nudge the autocratic Hosni Mubarak toward democracy; Mubarak ignored the advice. Last year, the Obama administration pleaded (gently) with the freely elected Mohamed Morsi to make his Muslim Brotherhood government more inclusive; Morsi ignored the advice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1985
What a pleasure it was to read a series of thoughtful, well-written articles on the Arab world, devoid of many of the typical stereotypes and misinformation. This is not to say that the articles were all positive, but that is natural, as this is journalism and not public relations. David Lamb's exploration of the different problems in the Arab world today not only contributes to American understanding but also forces Arabs in this country and Arab-Americans to take an incisive and closer look at an area of the world that is of special significance.
WORLD
September 29, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Amro Hassan
CAIRO - One aunt cursed him to hell, another accused him of murder. The intense family passions were roused when Ahmed Samir posted on Facebook his support for Egypt's deadly crackdown against the Muslim Brotherhood. The proclamation drew Samir and his irate relatives deeper into the nation's battles over politics and conscience after nearly three years of unrest. "My one aunt calls me a liar and prays for me to go to hell. She says I am covered with blood of those who were killed," said Samir, a customer relations representative for a bank.
WORLD
September 28, 2013 | By Radhouane Addala and Laura King
TUNIS, Tunisia -- Shaken by weeks of massive street protests, Tunisia's Islamist-led government has edged closer to stepping aside, agreeing Saturday to enter talks aimed at setting up a caretaker administration, participants in the negotiations said. Tunisia's popular uprising nearly three years ago threw off decades of autocratic rule and touched off protest movements that rolled across the Arab world. But, as also happened in Egypt, the Islamist-dominated coalition that subsequently came to power proved deeply unpopular, triggering large-scale unrest.
OPINION
September 7, 2013
Re "Senate panel supports U.S. strike on Syria," Sept. 5 It's time to call everyone's bluff on the Syrian chemical issue to smoke out the contending parties. Whether it be Bashar Assad's regime, the rebels, the U.S. and its allies, Arab states, the Russians or the Iranians, all claim they are against chemical weapons use in Syria. Leaving aside the wink-wink involved - obviously, some party (think the Assad regime) used the weapons in the August attack - let's put the representations to the test.
WORLD
August 11, 2013 | By Nabih Bulos
BEIRUT - With his pouty lips and soulful eyes, he was a stylish figure known as the King of Romance, a crooner of amorous ballads often seen cavorting with would-be starlets in MTV-style videos filmed on yachts, in upscale cafes and in swank homes. But Fadel Shaker's latest video - without a note uttered - may become his swan song, portraying the balladeer in a new and disturbing incarnation: hunkered down defiantly with a militant sheik and his armed followers, holding out against Lebanese soldiers he derided as dogs and pigs.
OPINION
August 10, 2013 | Doyle McManus
The "Arab Spring" may not have succeeded in bringing democracy to the Middle East. But it has provided powerful evidence of a different phenomenon: the illusion of U.S. influence over governments we once considered our clients. Take Egypt. Before 2011, the Bush and Obama administrations tried to nudge the autocratic Hosni Mubarak toward democracy; Mubarak ignored the advice. Last year, the Obama administration pleaded (gently) with the freely elected Mohamed Morsi to make his Muslim Brotherhood government more inclusive; Morsi ignored the advice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2013 | By Jasmine Elist, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
As change sweeps across the Arab world, there are a variety of lenses through which to examine these changes: religious, cultural, political, economic. Shereen El Feki has chosen a decidedly less conventional lens with her new new book “Sex and the Citadel: Intimate Life in a Changing Arab World” (Pantheon, $29), due out Tuesday. The book takes a close look at the sexual lives of men and women in the Middle East. Combining original research with first-person stories from housewives, young virgins, activists and sex therapists, “Sex and the Citadel” provides a detailed account of a veiled and sensitive aspect of Arab society.
WORLD
November 20, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The Gaza conflict has pressured Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi on many fronts: Each rocket Hamas fired into Israel has been a test of Morsi's loyalty. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has also been gauging how much damage he can inflict on Hamas before Morsi responds with more than public statements and diplomacy. And the United States and the West, the source of billions of dollars in aid and possible investment that Egypt desperately needs, are watching to see whether the Egyptian president emerges as a formidable and trusted regional voice.
WORLD
November 8, 2012 | Jeffrey Fleishman
President Obama faces a more volatile Middle East than the one he brought a sense of promise to nearly four years ago when he delivered his seminal "new beginnings" speech here to an intrigued, if suspicious, Muslim world. Unpopular Western-friendly autocrats no longer run Egypt and Tunisia, and in Libya, the mercurial Moammar Kadafi is dead and gone. But the White House has to contend with an aggressive political Islam that rose from "Arab Spring" movements even as it grapples with ongoing bloodshed in Syria, terrorist attacks on Americans and the persistent tinderbox that is Iran.
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