Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArata Isozaki
IN THE NEWS

Arata Isozaki

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Of all the arts, architecture has the most direct practical effect on daily urban life. We live and work inside it. It contains all the other arts in its museums, concert halls and theaters. It is womb, cave and sepulcher. Not only does it protect and nurture (or stifle and repress), its arrangement determines our movements and its look affects our sense of well-being. Are we welcome here or excluded?
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW
The Museum of Contemporary Art has begun its annual "Summer Nights at MOCA" program, a monthly series of evening events featuring free museum admission, live music, complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a no-host bar. On June 6, MOCA will feature flutist Eileen Holt and viewing and discussion of "Arata Isozaki 1960/1991 Architecture." The July 11 event will feature the improvisational music trio Submedia, and viewing and discussions of "High and Low : Modern Art and Popular Culture." On Aug.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1985 | BARBARA ISENBERG
The grand opening of the Museum of Contemporary Art's permanent home isn't expected for a full year, but the downtown showplace's sandstone facade, green aluminum panels and pyramid-shaped skylights are already drawing plenty of attention. So is its architect, Arata Isozaki, whose prior commissions had been exclusively in his native Japan. While the 54-year-old Tokyo-based architect had long been prominent at home, he's only recently begun accumulating a roster of major U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Of all the arts, architecture has the most direct practical effect on daily urban life. We live and work inside it. It contains all the other arts in its museums, concert halls and theaters. It is womb, cave and sepulcher. Not only does it protect and nurture (or stifle and repress), its arrangement determines our movements and its look affects our sense of well-being. Are we welcome here or excluded?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, William Wilson is The Times' art critic. and
Japanese architect Arata Isozaki seems to be a quintessential child of his time, molded and buffeted by great events. As a boy he saw his hometown flattened by American bombs. "I have a strong image that everything I do will always be destroyed or ruined," he says. "That image became my hidden trauma. . . . I never had the idea of becoming an architect, but in some way I thought, 'We have to reconstruct this destroyed situation.'
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1991
Japanese architect Arata Isozaki ("Arata Isozaki's Global Village," March 17) recalled collapsing and not working for two years after his work on "Tokyo's Expo '70." I hope it wasn't all in vain; Expo '70 was in Osaka. ALLEN ARATA Hathorne
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A lofty collection of architect superstars, academicians, art collectors and dealers turned up last weekend for a private viewing of the retrospective "Arata Isozaki: Architecture 1960-1990," which opened to the public Sunday, and tried to get close to the quiet man in the Issey Miyake tuxedo. Friday evening's event at the Museum of Contemporary Art, which Isozaki designed, also was billed as a birthday party for the Japan-based architect.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1991 | SHAUNA SNOW
The Museum of Contemporary Art has begun its annual "Summer Nights at MOCA" program, a monthly series of evening events featuring free museum admission, live music, complimentary hors d'oeuvres and a no-host bar. On June 6, MOCA will feature flutist Eileen Holt and viewing and discussion of "Arata Isozaki 1960/1991 Architecture." The July 11 event will feature the improvisational music trio Submedia, and viewing and discussions of "High and Low : Modern Art and Popular Culture." On Aug.
REAL ESTATE
January 20, 1985 | Sam Hall Kaplan
These are good times for architecture in Los Angeles, but not necessarily for local architects. Judging from letters and telephone calls, and comments heard at various gatherings, there seems to be a healthy rise in the design consciousness of developers, public officials and citizens. This, in turn, has prompted a healthy questioning of proposed projects, such as the effect of their height, scale, massing and details on the street scape and skyline, as well as simply how they function.
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | MAGGIE JACKSON, Associated Press
Japan's top architects have tasted freedom and found it heady. Now their own masters, they worship no ideologies of past style or futuristic form. "We are free from icons, free from gods," said Kisho Kurokawa, with the jumbled silhouette of Tokyo stretching below his studio windows. "It's a new age, a dynamic situation." Architectural critics and Kurokowa's colleagues agree.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1991
Japanese architect Arata Isozaki ("Arata Isozaki's Global Village," March 17) recalled collapsing and not working for two years after his work on "Tokyo's Expo '70." I hope it wasn't all in vain; Expo '70 was in Osaka. ALLEN ARATA Hathorne
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A lofty collection of architect superstars, academicians, art collectors and dealers turned up last weekend for a private viewing of the retrospective "Arata Isozaki: Architecture 1960-1990," which opened to the public Sunday, and tried to get close to the quiet man in the Issey Miyake tuxedo. Friday evening's event at the Museum of Contemporary Art, which Isozaki designed, also was billed as a birthday party for the Japan-based architect.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1991 | WILLIAM WILSON, William Wilson is The Times' art critic. and
Japanese architect Arata Isozaki seems to be a quintessential child of his time, molded and buffeted by great events. As a boy he saw his hometown flattened by American bombs. "I have a strong image that everything I do will always be destroyed or ruined," he says. "That image became my hidden trauma. . . . I never had the idea of becoming an architect, but in some way I thought, 'We have to reconstruct this destroyed situation.'
NEWS
November 26, 1987 | MAGGIE JACKSON, Associated Press
Japan's top architects have tasted freedom and found it heady. Now their own masters, they worship no ideologies of past style or futuristic form. "We are free from icons, free from gods," said Kisho Kurokawa, with the jumbled silhouette of Tokyo stretching below his studio windows. "It's a new age, a dynamic situation." Architectural critics and Kurokowa's colleagues agree.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"The Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art may soon be the country's best known unbuilt art museum," Patricia Failing wrote three years ago in ArtNews magazine. MOCA had already held that position for four years, according to Lewis MacAdams in California magazine: "Probably no museum has ever been as thoroughly dissected before it opened, or had pinned on it the artistic/aesthetic hopes of so many people, as has MOCA."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1985 | BARBARA ISENBERG
The grand opening of the Museum of Contemporary Art's permanent home isn't expected for a full year, but the downtown showplace's sandstone facade, green aluminum panels and pyramid-shaped skylights are already drawing plenty of attention. So is its architect, Arata Isozaki, whose prior commissions had been exclusively in his native Japan. While the 54-year-old Tokyo-based architect had long been prominent at home, he's only recently begun accumulating a roster of major U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"The Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art may soon be the country's best known unbuilt art museum," Patricia Failing wrote three years ago in ArtNews magazine. MOCA had already held that position for four years, according to Lewis MacAdams in California magazine: "Probably no museum has ever been as thoroughly dissected before it opened, or had pinned on it the artistic/aesthetic hopes of so many people, as has MOCA."
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
The UCLA Art Council and Bullocks Wilshire are collaborating on a "Night and Day" dinner-dance July 13 to honor David Hayes, one of First Lady Nancy Reagan's designers. During the black-tie evening, Hayes will present his first collection of evening clothes and preview his designs for fall. The whole affair takes place in the landmark Bullocks Wilshire building. Heading up the Art Council's benefit are Mrs. Gerald Aronson, Mrs. Robert S. Berger, Mrs. Paul Selwyn, Mrs.
NEWS
June 28, 1985 | Jody Jacobs
The UCLA Art Council and Bullocks Wilshire are collaborating on a "Night and Day" dinner-dance July 13 to honor David Hayes, one of First Lady Nancy Reagan's designers. During the black-tie evening, Hayes will present his first collection of evening clothes and preview his designs for fall. The whole affair takes place in the landmark Bullocks Wilshire building. Heading up the Art Council's benefit are Mrs. Gerald Aronson, Mrs. Robert S. Berger, Mrs. Paul Selwyn, Mrs.
REAL ESTATE
January 20, 1985 | Sam Hall Kaplan
These are good times for architecture in Los Angeles, but not necessarily for local architects. Judging from letters and telephone calls, and comments heard at various gatherings, there seems to be a healthy rise in the design consciousness of developers, public officials and citizens. This, in turn, has prompted a healthy questioning of proposed projects, such as the effect of their height, scale, massing and details on the street scape and skyline, as well as simply how they function.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|