Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArcheologists
IN THE NEWS

Archeologists

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When archeologist John Foster started peeling the asphalt from a parking lot in downtown Ventura, he knew he wouldn't have to dig deep to find a cache of long-buried relics. He just didn't realize how many he'd find and from how many different eras. "It was layer upon layer," he said this week as he surveyed the emerging foundations of a long-buried, 3-foot-thick mission wall, a span of 200-year-old terra cotta floor tiles laid by Chumash laborers, and a channel fashioned from inverted roof tiles that irrigated a long-dead garden.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
When archeologist John Foster started peeling the asphalt from a parking lot in downtown Ventura, he knew he wouldn't have to dig deep to find a cache of long-buried relics. He just didn't realize how many he'd find and from how many different eras. "It was layer upon layer," he said this week as he surveyed the emerging foundations of a long-buried, 3-foot-thick mission wall, a span of 200-year-old terra cotta floor tiles laid by Chumash laborers, and a channel fashioned from inverted roof tiles that irrigated a long-dead garden.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1997 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
After several months of searching for an archeological firm to reevaluate the importance of identified archeological sites on the Hellman Ranch property, the city this week hired KEA Environmental of San Diego. The decision will allow the city to proceed with the public comment period for the recently released environmental impact report for the Hellman property, for which development is proposed. The city Environmental Quality Control Board will meet Tuesday to hear public input.
NATIONAL
July 14, 2010 | Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Workers excavating at the World Trade Center site have unearthed the 32-foot-long hull of a ship probably buried in the 18th century. The vessel probably was used along with other debris to fill in land to extend lower Manhattan into the Hudson River, archeologists said. Archeologists Molly McDonald and A. Michael Pappalardo were at the site of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on Tuesday morning when workers uncovered the artifacts. "We noticed curved timbers that a backhoe brought up," McDonald said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 21, 2002 | SALAH NASRAWI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
As researcher Ann Macy Roth excavates a burial site just behind the Great Pyramid in the wind-swept desert near Cairo, her time is spent peering into her work, not over her shoulder. Some American and other Western archeologists are concerned that anti-American sentiment since the Sept. 11 attacks might put them at risk in the Middle East. But Roth, who over the last 14 years has excavated, studied and mapped out Pharaonic tombs, is mostly concerned with the heat and the dust.
NEWS
May 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
Archeologists say they have discovered the first slave dwelling ever found in New York City, a hidden garret in a 300-year-old former farmhouse in Brooklyn. The space may also have been used years later as a pre-Civil War stopover for slaves escaping via the Underground Railroad. The results of a three-year search by archeologists H. Arthur Bankoff, Christopher Ricciardi and Alyssa Loorya were published in the May/June issue of Archaeology magazine.
NEWS
November 30, 1986 | JOYCE A. VENEZIA, Associated Press
Archeologists digging through knee-deep mud were searching not for prehistoric dinosaur fossils but for common, ordinary sawdust. For those who practice industrial archeology, a relatively new branch of the science of studying ancient cultures, sawdust and old beams can be the basis of learning about the beginnings of a country. In this case, the archeologists are unearthing the remains of one of southern New Jersey's first sawmills, a water-powered relic that could be more than a century old.
NEWS
September 21, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Archeologist Mike Mitchell picked up charred bone fragments along the ancient Indian trail in this remote stretch of Riverside County desert. "These are deer or bighorn sheep bones more than likely barbecued and eaten by Indians a long, long time ago," mused Mitchell, 48, an archeologist with the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Mitchell was following what he described as a footpath, "perhaps 1,000 to 2,000 years old," that snakes across the barren desert landscape.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1994 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The archeologist who unearthed what some believe to be ancient Native American bones in the Bolsa Chica Wetlands reported to police that she received a 3-inch bullet in the mail, engraved with a Native American slogan and her name. "I was shocked," said Nancy Whitney-Desautels, the archeologist hired by the Koll Real Estate Group to excavate a 7.4-acre site near the wetlands in preparation for a proposed housing development. "I went numb for at least half an hour.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1995 | Hunter Drohojowska-Philp, Hunter Drohojowska-Philp is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Indiana Jones notwithstanding, when the subject of ancient Egypt comes to mind, whether it is the opening of King Tut's tomb or the deciphering of hieroglyphics, Europeans have most often been in the spotlight. But during the 20th Century, Americans have had more than their share of the action. That is the subject of "The American Discovery of Ancient Egypt," opening today at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.
WORLD
November 5, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
King Tut's mummified face was unveiled for the first time in public -- more than 3,000 years after the Egyptian pharaoh was shrouded in linen and buried. Archeologists carefully lifted the fragile mummy out of a quartz sarcophagus decorated with stone-carved protective goddesses in his tomb in Luxor, momentarily pulling aside a beige covering to reveal a leathery black body.
SCIENCE
September 1, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Excavations at a 6,000-year-old archeological mound in northeastern Syria called Tell Brak are providing an alternative explanation for how the first cities may have grown. Archeologists have thought cities generally began in a single small area and grew outward -- but evidence indicates that the urban area at Tell Brak was a ring of small villages that grew inward to become a city. The finds, reported Friday in the journal Science, provide insight into political development in the region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2007 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
On an autumn day 125 years ago, photographer John Calvin Brewster climbed to the top of a scrubby hill above San Buenaventura Mission and did future historians a big favor. Pointing a bulky camera, he took a photograph of the pioneer town so precise that researchers still pore over it to glean information about a horse-and-buggy society that was about to undergo dramatic change.
NATIONAL
July 19, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Conservationist Marjory Stoneman Douglas once famously grumbled that Lake Okeechobee, the liquid heart of her beloved Everglades, had been poisoned by man's careless disposal of "pesticides, fertilizer, dead cats and old boots." She didn't know about the 1920s steamship, rusty anchors, tractor tires, fishing-boat motors, settlers' stovepipes, Native American tools and jewelry, and the bones of man and beast dating back thousands of years. All were hauled from the lake bottom this summer.
WORLD
May 9, 2007 | Ken Ellingwood, Times Staff Writer
For more than three decades, Israeli archeologist Ehud Netzer scraped at the ancient man-made hillock. He searched the top. He dug at the bottom. Finally Netzer carved into the midsection and there, he says, found his prize: the grave of Herod the Great. The evidence, in the form of shards of decorative stonework that may have been a coffin and pieces of a structure thought to have been the mausoleum, is still far from ironclad proof. Archeologists have not found a body.
SCIENCE
March 2, 2007 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Archeologists have solved the mystery of the Thirteen Towers, a line of low stone structures that have spanned an arid Peruvian slope like a massive set of prehistoric teeth for 2,400 years. The towers lined up outside the citadel at Chankillo are a massive solar observatory that marks not only the summer and winter solstices, but also the days and weeks of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2004 | Robert Hollis, Special to the Times
For the first time since the 1850 wreck of the Frolic was discovered on the rugged Mendocino County coast south of here, archeologists are seeking help from private divers who over the years have collected artifacts from the cargo-laden vessel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2000 | JESSICA GARRISON and DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wiping tears from her eyes and clutching a post for support, Vonsheena Flannagan leaned over the fence around Woodlawn Cemetery in Compton and tried desperately to spot her mother's grave. "That's where she's supposed to be," Flannagan said Wednesday, pointing to a tidy row of headstones. "But we don't know for sure." The 25-acre cemetery was shut down Tuesday by state inspectors who reported finding pieces of bones and caskets scattered across its grounds.
NEWS
January 7, 2007 | Nicholas Paphitis, Associated Press
Unlike its larger, postcard-perfect neighbors in the Aegean Sea, Keros is a tiny rocky dump inhabited by a single goatherd. But the barren islet was of major importance to the mysterious Cycladic people, a sophisticated pre-Greek civilization with no written language that flourished 4,500 years ago and produced strikingly modern-looking artwork.
SCIENCE
November 14, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Following directions in the Dead Sea Scrolls, archeologists have found the latrines used by the sect that produced the scrolls, discovering that efforts to achieve ritual purity inadvertently exposed members to intestinal parasites that shortened their lives. The young male zealots who established their sect at Qumran chose a life of austerity and isolation, but they could not have foreseen the hardships created by their religiously imposed toilet practices, researchers said Monday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|