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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1994 | JON NALICK
Inside a 60-foot trailer decorated to resemble a typical Southern California canyon, Liz Lamarre, 12, plunged her plastic trowel into a small plot of earth and began looking for historic artifacts. After rooting around unsuccessfully for a few moments, she cried out, "Oh, I did find something!" and pulled out an abalone shell. Liz was one of about 30 students at Frank N.
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NATIONAL
July 2, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Several Native American tribes are lamenting the damage to sacred land and archeological sites caused by the largest fire in New Mexico state history. The Las Conchas fire has charred about 13,000 acres within the Santa Clara Canyon, an area of great significance to those who live in Santa Clara Pueblo, a Native American community north of Santa Fe. "This is a fire like we've never seen before," said Santa Carla Pueblo Gov. Walter Dasheno. The burned area accounts for nearly 25% of the reservation's 55,000 acres, and the blaze is expected to consume more land in the coming days.
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SCIENCE
October 12, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archeologists have found a large cache of early 17th century armor deep in a well in historic Jamestown, Va., a hint as to the military readiness of the New World's first permanent English settlement. The pieces, found about 10 feet below the surface, include body armor and possibly breast plates, back plates and helmets. "Most archeologists will go their whole lives and not find a single piece of armor," archeologist Eric Deetz said as each new piece emerged from the narrow, brick-lined shaft.
NATIONAL
June 9, 2011 | By Ashley Powers, Nicholas Riccardi and Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of Arizona residents fled a voracious wildfire Wednesday that has devoured a stretch of sparsely populated pinelands the size of Phoenix and shows no sign of stopping. The Wallow fire, which began May 29, has blackened nearly 389,000 acres, making it the second-largest blaze in state history. It seemed poised to surpass the record-holder from 2002: Because of high winds and bone-dry terrain, the fire was 0% contained, meaning firefighters had not even begun to hem it in, much less get it under control.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1993 | CARMEN VALENCIA
Rather than reading about ancient civilizations, sixth-graders at Telfair Avenue Elementary School in Pacoima are brandishing trowels and sifting through a make-believe archeological site for clues to the past. Since last week, 23 students from teacher Michael West's classroom have painstakingly excavated six dirt pits to unearth 2,000-year-old artifacts representing the remains of an ancient village.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1993 | SHELBY GRAD
Three consulting firms have been chosen to help city officials determine how new developments affect the city's "archeological resources." The consultants were selected from among seven firms last month by a special panel that included members of the city's new Archeological Advisory Committee. The City Council approved the selections last week. The firms are Chambers Group Inc. of Irvine, Environmental Research Archeologists of Los Angeles and Interdisciplinary Research Inc. of Altadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1995 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Skene has big plans for his piece of Malibu. On five wind-swept acres, he envisions a $1-million chateau with rose gardens overlooking the winding coastline. But Skene, 43, has yet to break ground more than a year after buying the vacant site for his dream home. The mortgage broker has been battling the city over a law requiring property owners to conduct archeological studies before construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1993 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Contrary to previous beliefs, Mayan society had a large and prosperous middle class built upon the spoils of internecine warfare, two Florida archeologists reported Monday. Although scientists once believed that the Mayan civilization collapsed as a result of the stratification between the royal elite and the very poor, new tombs discovered in Belize strongly support the emerging consensus that it fell instead as the result of increasingly fierce warfare.
SCIENCE
October 19, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Construction workers building a wall on the edge of Nicaragua's capital have unearthed by accident graves believed to date back 1,000 years, experts said. The pre-Columbian cemetery on the shores of Lake Xolotlan in Managua contained the graves of about 20 men, women and children who were buried with pottery and other artifacts, archeologist Jorge Espinosa said. The remains are being sent to the United States for study, he said.
NEWS
October 13, 1995 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There, far below, are the tightly packed, flat-roofed houses. Swoop down and an entrance can be found--a hole pierced through the ceiling of one home. Clamber down a ladder and, suddenly, a room comes into view. Along the walls, there are benches lined with cattle horns. The columns are decorated with bulls' heads. In a central spot, positioned like a shrine, rests a molded relief that may represent the bosomy Anatolian "Mother Goddess."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Britney Barnes, Los Angeles Times
Despite the environmental community's pleas to "save it, don't pave it," the Huntington Beach City Council has approved plans to convert a former 5-acre archeological site near the Bolsa Chica wetlands into the city's first "green" housing development. "I'm sure every community has its cross to bear, and Bolsa Chica has been Huntington's for a long time," said Councilman Don Hansen, who voted to approve the project. "I find all the findings that were presented tonight adequate." But environmentalists who packed Tuesday's meeting raised concerns about building a 22-home development so close to the wetlands and argued that the area is of great ecological and historical importance.
SCIENCE
February 14, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archaeologists have found a mass grave in Mexico City with 49 human skeletons laid out in neat lines that could reveal clues about the 16th century Spanish conquest that killed millions. The investigators found the skeletons, all lying face up with arms crossed, as they searched for a palace complex in the Tlatelolco area, once a major religious and political center for the ancient Aztec elite. It is likely the indigenous people buried in the grave died in battle against the Spanish or during plagues that killed many in the native population in 1545 and 1576, said Salvador Guilliem, director of the site for the National Institute of Anthropology and History.
WORLD
July 20, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Archaeologists will excavate hundreds of fragments of an ancient wooden boat entombed in an underground chamber next to Giza's Great Pyramid and try to reassemble the craft, Egyptologists announced Saturday. The 4,500-year-old vessel is the sister ship of a similar boat removed in pieces from another pit in 1954 and painstakingly reconstructed. Experts believe the boats were meant to ferry in the afterlife the pharaoh who built the Great Pyramid.
SCIENCE
April 12, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Excavation of two graves in the Mixtec Indian village of Tayata, in the Mexican state of Oaxaca along the Pacific Coast, have revealed evidence that the Mixtec cremated some of their dead as early as 3,000 years ago, researchers reported Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The find represents the earliest evidence for cremation, a practice that was later reserved for Mixtec kings and Aztec emperors. Evidence from the graves indicates that Mixtec elite may have emerged as early as 1100 BC, and that the elite consumed dogs as part of their diet.
SCIENCE
January 26, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The victims of human sacrifice by Mexico's ancient Mayas were likely boys and young men, archaeologists said this week. Maya priests in Chichen Itza on the Yucatan peninsula sacrificed children by throwing them into sacred water-filled sinkhole caves known as cenotes. Archaeologist Guillermo de Anda from the University of Yucatan pieced together the bones of 127 bodies and found that more than 80% were likely boys between the ages of 3 and 11. The rest were mostly men.
SCIENCE
December 29, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archeologists have discovered the ruins of an 800-year-old Aztec pyramid in the heart of the Mexican capital that could show the ancient city is at least a century older than previously thought. Mexican archeologists found the ruins, which are about 36 feet high, in the central Tlatelolco area, once a major religious and political center for the Aztec elite.
NEWS
July 31, 1997 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Marine archeologists using an undersea robot to prowl the Mediterranean Sea floor discovered what may be the largest concentration of ancient shipwrecks ever found in the deep sea, one of them a Roman ship dating from before the time of Christ, the researchers announced Wednesday. The discovery, which spans more than 2,000 years of human history, offers an unusual glimpse into mankind's maritime past, experts in marine archeology said.
NEWS
September 27, 1993 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the movies, archeologists are usually professors in pith helmets, whacking trails through the jungle. In real life, though, they're as likely to have a Chamber of Commerce membership and a payroll to meet. These days, archeology--the science of "gods, graves and scholars"--is a half-billion-dollar-a-year business. The boom started 24 years ago when the federal government began demanding environmental impact reports on federal projects.
SCIENCE
July 7, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chinese researchers say they have found a strange pyramid-shape chamber while surveying the huge underground tomb of China's first emperor. Remote sensing equipment has revealed what appears to be a 100-foot-high room above Emperor Qin Shihuang's tomb near the ancient capital of Xi'an in Shaanxi province, the state-run New China News Agency reported this week. The room has not been excavated.
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