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Archeology Egypt

NEWS
March 20, 1992 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The recent discovery of the remains of a 4,500-year-old bakery on the Giza Plateau may be a key element in determining the sociopolitical structure of Egypt in the 27th Century BC. The bakery, along with a massive wall that cordoned off part of the site, suggests further that Egypt's rulers also lived there for much of the year. This gives the scientists hope of finding a palace nearby.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1990 | MIMI MANN, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Ancient, precious gold coins stolen by workmen from their hiding place behind a wall in a medieval house have been recovered by police and turned over to a Cairo museum. Three-quarters of the 3,611 medieval coins in the priceless collection were minted in Europe, mainly in Italian city-states that produced the money of international commerce in the Middle Ages. Such coins never had been found in Egypt. Stashed for centuries, the cache contained nearly 28 pounds of gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1991 | MIMI MANN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Egypt was an ancient, religious land under the stranglehold of Nero's Rome when the first strains of Christianity came quietly and swiftly across the Sinai Desert from Judea. How did the new religion arrive, who were the first Christians, what were the early teachings and how did the message spread and change? Legends and stories are far more plentiful than facts. German archeologist Peter Grossmann, who specializes in early Christian sites of the Near East, is trying to unlock the mysteries.
NEWS
December 2, 1998 | From Associated Press
Using magnetic sensors and computers, Egyptian experts have located and mapped an important Pharaonic city in the Nile Delta, officials said Tuesday. Ahmed Gouda Husain of the Geophysical Research Center said the experts have been able to create detailed images of Qantir, which was a capital of one of Egypt's most famous kings, Ramses II. Ramses II, a pharaoh in the so-called New Kingdom era, ruled Egypt from 1304 to 1237 BC.
NEWS
October 29, 1995 | Associated Press
Archeologists have found what they believe is the world's oldest paved canal, built about 4,500 years ago near the pyramids of Giza, an Egyptian scholar said Saturday. The canal was probably used to carry water from the Nile for the ritual bathing of the body of Pharaoh Chephren, who ruled from 2558 BC to 2532 BC and whose pyramid is the second largest of the three at Giza, said Zahi Hawass of the Egyptian Antiquities Authority.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1999
The mummy of a priest and the skeleton of a grave robber were the chief findings in the televised opening of two Egyptian tombs Tuesday evening. The skeleton was found inside the pyramid of Queen Khamerernebty II but was clearly not the queen's, said archeologist Zahi Hawass. "The entrance and the chambers were unfinished and the queen was never buried here," he said after the show. The mummy was found in the Tomb of the Unknown, recently unearthed by Hawass.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The discovery of the remains of the long-sought city occupied by pyramid workers more than 4,000 years ago is providing new details about how pyramids were constructed and giving archeologists their first glimpse into an important facet of life in ancient Egypt. The remains were unearthed by workers digging trenches to install a sewage system in a community now settled by Egyptian peasants who service the tourist industry on the historic Giza Plateau in Egypt.
NEWS
October 29, 1998 | Reuters
A granite sphinx with the head of Cleopatra's father emerged Wednesday from the choppy waters of Alexandria harbor after 1,600 years underwater. Divers led by French marine archeologist Franck Goddio winched the superbly preserved sphinx, bolted into a steel frame, onto the deck of the research vessel Princess Dudu.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Egyptologist Howard Carter chipped a small hole into the wall guarding the inner chamber of the tomb of the young Pharaoh Tutankhamen, he poked his head in for a first look. Could he see anything? his sponsor, standing behind him, wanted to know. "Yes," Carter replied. "Wonderful things." "As my eyes grew accustomed to the light," he wrote later, "details of the room within emerged slowly from the mist, strange animals, statues and gold--everywhere the glint of gold."
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