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NEWS
September 11, 1989 | DAN FISHER, Times Staff Writer
The mood was festive that memorable night in 1984 as members and guests gathered at the 16th-Century palace of King Henry VIII for an elaborate candlelight dinner marking the 150th anniversary of the Royal Institute of British Architects.
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REAL ESTATE
May 18, 1986
The Atrium, now completed in Irvine, is an office building with a highly unusual architectural design, incorporating--as its name implies--an atrium. But more than the usual atrium. The twin, 10-story towers are roughly triangular and stepped back away from each other in such a way that the central space is enclosed in glass to form the Atrium's 130-foot-high atrium. A development of the French & McKenna Co., the building at 19100 Von Karman Ave.
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | LEON WHITESON
In an age when select designers are singled out as "starchitects," celebrated in magazines and in art gallery retrospectives, it is easy to overlook the good gray brigade who set the style for much of what is being built around us. The spectrum of mainstream designers is wide, ranging from those in large offices with staffs of more than 50 to others who prefer small and highly personal practices with only a few associates.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | SCOTT HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
When the New York architect first showed off his big, bold scheme to expand Los Angeles' historic Central Library, the city's official design connoisseurs thought it was, well, certainly big and bold. True, they asked for A Statement, but this seemed, to them, more like A Shout. Try again, they told the architect. This is a library, after all. Some months later, the Cultural Affairs Commission again found fault, this time over plans for Fire Station No.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you want to peer into the future of post-Sept. 11 America, few projects offer a better lens than the recently unveiled plan for a $9.6-billion renovation of Los Angeles International Airport. Designed by Landrum & Brown, a Los Angeles firm that specializes in airport design, the plan has been touted by Mayor James K. Hahn as a safer, more efficient transportation hub for the new century. It would require the demolition of four terminals and the removal of all existing parking structures.
NEWS
May 3, 2001 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Talk about good neighbors. Architect and urban planner Barton Myers, who lives in Montecito, entrusted his professional archive to the nearby University Art Museum at UC Santa Barbara. "It is great that I found a home for it," Myers said from his office in Beverly Hills. "This way you can see 30 years of an architect's work. There are a lot of beautiful drawings." A lot means about 700,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1990 | DIRK SUTRO
In the 1990s, the best San Diego architects will let a changing society lead them to fresh designs. People came to San Diego in record numbers during the '80s. As the city grew, architects produced designs on tight deadlines, with little room for careful, innovative thinking. The leading architects of the '90s will have to do much more than crank out buildable plans. They will have to carefully consider changing "programs"--the client agendas that serve as the starting point for designs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About six months ago, Robert Imber was out driving when he stumbled across the answer to his dreams: a vacant multi-hexagonal commercial building here known as Alto Capistrano. "I drove by it on a weekend and my 'architect magnet' went off," said Imber, 47, of San Clemente. "There it was in front of me. I turned the corner and boing! It was as though it came to me." What better place to house an International Museum of Architecture?
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | LEON WHITESON, Leon Whiteson is a Los Angeles-based architecture writer and critic.
If any individual can be credited with creating modern architecture in Los Angeles, it would be William Pereira. A heroic figure at a time when the city was becoming a regional metropolis, Pereira was featured on the cover of Time magazine in 1963 for his work as master planner of Orange County's 93,000-acre Irvine Ranch. When he died in 1985, he had chalked up an Oscar-worthy list of design credits in a practice that spanned more than 50 years.
NEWS
January 2, 1989 | LEON WHITESON
What's an architect to do when designing a building for a socially undesirable or an aesthetically ugly activity? "Do you disguise, say, a sewage treatment plant's function by prettying it up with fake mansard roofs and roses 'round the door?" architect Anthony Lumsden asked. "Or do you take the more sophisticated route of developing a design that honestly expresses what goes on inside, and find a way to turn that action into interesting architecture?"
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