Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArctic Environment
IN THE NEWS

Arctic Environment

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six miles out on the polar ice pack--rising out of the silent, frozen sea--stands a 5-acre island and an army of backhoes gouging a massive trench into the ocean floor. Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, workers race to complete the first undersea oil pipeline ever attempted in the formidable moonscape of the Arctic Ocean. Delay a few weeks and the ice supporting the heavy cranes will give way to the spring thaw. Hurry and the pipeline won't get buried properly.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 29, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six miles out on the polar ice pack--rising out of the silent, frozen sea--stands a 5-acre island and an army of backhoes gouging a massive trench into the ocean floor. Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, workers race to complete the first undersea oil pipeline ever attempted in the formidable moonscape of the Arctic Ocean. Delay a few weeks and the ice supporting the heavy cranes will give way to the spring thaw. Hurry and the pipeline won't get buried properly.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1995 | BRUCE BABBITT, Bruce Babbitt is secretary of the Interior
The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the last protected fragment of the great coastal plain where North America slopes down to the polar ocean. More than 85% of this unique area is already open to oil exploration and development. But apparently that is not enough.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton will veto the massive budget bill nearing completion in Congress if it includes a plan to allow oil and gas drilling in a biologically rich Alaskan wilderness, the White House said Thursday.
NEWS
September 22, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton will veto the massive budget bill nearing completion in Congress if it includes a plan to allow oil and gas drilling in a biologically rich Alaskan wilderness, the White House said Thursday.
NEWS
June 16, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States and seven other countries with territory north of the Arctic Circle signed a non-binding agreement to cooperate in monitoring pollution of the arctic environment and to protect the region's plant and animal life. The pact, signed in Finland, calls for cooperative programs to monitor pollution by oil, radiation, metals, acid and noise. Signers are the United States, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden and the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1988
Your editorial "Secret in the North" (March 20) is based on a couple of faulty premises, which I'd like to correct. - The confidentiality period you refer to is provided by state law and does not involve the federal government. - The regular 25-month confidentiality period expires on May 24. However, provisions in state law allow for an extension in the confidentiality period--at the request of a well's operator--pending the disposition of unleased land in the vicinity. Chevron intends to apply for extended confidentiality prior to the expiration of the 25-month confidentiality period.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1991
After reading your article about government oversight of the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS), "Alaska Pipeline Regulators Were Lax, GAO Says," (Aug. 5), we at Alyeska are concerned that your readers might regard the General Accounting Office audit as a criticism of the pipeline's operation these past 14 years. The record is clear on this matter--TAPS--has been an efficient, safe and environmentally sound means to transport oil from Alaska's North Slope--one-quarter of America's domestic production.
OPINION
April 15, 2002
The Bush administration has found a new excuse for exploring and drilling for oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge--Saddam Hussein's cutoff of oil exports. But this argument is just as weak as all that came before. Even the White House acknowledged Thursday that the Iraqi cutoff had not affected the oil market. ''The point is why take the risk?'' Bush spokesman Ari Fleischer said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1995 | BRUCE BABBITT, Bruce Babbitt is secretary of the Interior
The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the last protected fragment of the great coastal plain where North America slopes down to the polar ocean. More than 85% of this unique area is already open to oil exploration and development. But apparently that is not enough.
SCIENCE
March 14, 2014 | By Amina Khan
How's this for "death by cute?" Paleontologists have dug up a fearsome new dinosaur in a surprising place: Nanuqsaurus, a pygmy tyrannosaur that lived far away from its larger sharped-toothed cousins - in what is now Alaska. The newly named Nanuqsaurus hoglundi fossil, described in PLoS ONE, reveals that dinosaurs lived in the Arctic 70 million years ago, during a much warmer period in Earth's history. “The discovery of Nanuqsaurus hoglundi provides new insights into tyrannosaurid adaptability and evolution in an ancient greenhouse Arctic,” wrote study authors Anthony Fiorillo and Ronald Tykoski of the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2010 | By Kim Murphy, Los Angeles Times
With the BP oil well blowout in the Gulf of Mexico successfully contained, Shell Alaska announced Wednesday that it had filed an application to proceed with exploratory offshore drilling in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska. The Obama administration suspended all offshore operations in the remote, fragile Arctic seas this year after the BP spill, but Shell officials said they had prepared a more robust oil blowout containment plan and were ready to proceed next summer with a single well 17 miles off the North Slope.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|