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Area Codes

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2003 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Arguing that the Inland Empire is running out of phone numbers, the California Public Utilities Commission voted Thursday to give western Riverside County a new area code while allowing San Bernardino County to keep its area code. Residents of much of western Riverside County will switch to the 951 area code in July, though people calling them who mistakenly dial 909 will have a three-month grace period after that. The commission voted 3 to 1 to approve the split.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2003 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
In a victory for local businesses and residents, a divided California Public Utilities Commission on Thursday voted not to impose a new area code on the South Bay -- at least not in the foreseeable future. Telephone service carriers, saying they were rapidly running out of numbers in the 310 area code, sought the change that would have affected the communities south of Los Angeles International Airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2003 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
Western San Bernardino County would keep the 909 area code, and nearly all of western Riverside County would be switched to a new 951 number, under a draft decision released Tuesday by the California Public Utilities Commission. The eastern parts of the counties are in the 760 area code and are unaffected by the proposal. But both counties may hang onto the 909 code a bit longer if a plan proposed by one commissioner is adopted instead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2003 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
The California Public Utilities Commission granted another short reprieve on Thursday to South Bay telephone users by again delaying a vote on an unpopular proposal to split the 310 area code. The postponement, until the PUC's Oct. 16 meeting, gave the commission more time to assess whether recent and pending actions by the Federal Communications Commission would free up enough telephone numbers to avoid the need for a new area code in the region.
NEWS
July 16, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
The Board of Supervisors voted last week to oppose a plan to assign a new area code to several communities. Supervisor Dennis Hansberger pressed his colleagues to oppose the plan under consideration by the California Public Utilities Commission that would put Oak Glen, Forest Falls and parts of Yucaipa and Angelus Oaks in a new 951 area code. The rest of San Bernardino County would remain in the 909 area code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2003 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
The San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted to oppose a plan to split off several communities into a new area code. Supervisor Dennis Hansberger pressed his colleagues to oppose the plan under consideration by the California Public Utilities Commission that would put Oak Glen, Forest Falls and portions of Yucaipa and Angelus Oaks in a new 951 area code. The rest of the county would remain in the 909 area code.
OPINION
July 2, 2003
Loretta Lynch makes several excellent points regarding the senselessness of the proposed split of the 310 and 909 area codes, as well as the shenanigans perpetrated by the cellular providers behind the scenes in order to push through their long-desired plans (Voices, June 28). Unfortunately, she never discusses the question of how the 310 split will be implemented. The Public Utilities Commission has stated that the South Bay (south of Imperial Highway) will be burdened with an area code change (to 424)
NEWS
June 28, 2003 | Loretta Lynch, Loretta Lynch is a commissioner on the California Public Utilities Commission.
The California Public Utilities Commission is poised to split the 310 and 909 area codes this summer based on the "Chicken Little" threat that we are running out of phone numbers. We have seen these tactics before, in 1999 when residents in 310 were threatened with an area-code split that proved unnecessary. Just as we discovered then, today there are more than enough phone numbers left in 310 to allow the PUC to hold off on splitting this area code.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2003 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
State regulators will wait until at least Aug. 21 before deciding whether South Bay residents and businesses between Los Angeles International Airport and Long Beach will get a new area code. Though opponents of the split in the 310 area code would have preferred to see the California Public Utilities Commission vote down the proposal, they nonetheless applauded the delay.
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