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SPORTS
July 4, 1994 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The religious cross that Romanian Coach Anghel Iordanescu clutches tightly in his hand during soccer matches is as much an inspiration as it is for luck. He had never revealed the giver of the gift or the habit to the outside world, only to his wife and children. Sunday, Iordanescu wanted the whole world to know shortly after his Romanian soccer team announced its arrival among the world's elite, advancing to the World Cup quarterfinals with a 3-2 victory over Argentina.
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SPORTS
December 19, 2000 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Which nation will win soccer's World Cup in 2002? It may seem too early to ask that question, but for the fact that one of the few countries with a realistic chance will play at the Coliseum on Wednesday night. Argentina, whose domestic league is increasingly beset by fan violence, nevertheless has managed to piece together a national team that shows every sign of being a serious contender in the Japan-South Korea World Cup.
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SPORTS
March 12, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a fading resort city attempting to reclaim its title as Argentina's favorite seaside retreat, many of the half-million residents began celebrating the XII Pan American Games days before Saturday night's opening ceremony at Estadio Ciudad de Mar del Plata. While bands playing Argentine tangos, Spanish torch songs and even Yanqui rock 'n roll turned the promenade alongside the Atlantic Ocean into their stage, hundreds of visitors to the beach sang and danced in the sand.
SPORTS
April 9, 2000 | From Associated Press
Argentina withdrew Saturday from the Davis Cup American Zone series against Chile after violence by an angry crowd at Santiago, Chile, forced cancellation of the second singles match the day before. "Our players do not have the necessary mental and psychological conditions to continue to play," said Enrique Morea, president of the Argentine Tennis Federation. Referee Tony Hernandez declared Chile the winner, 5-0.
SPORTS
November 3, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Representatives from Mar del Plata, Argentina, will try in meetings this week at Acapulco, Mexico, to inspire confidence in the resort city's ability to organize the 1995 Pan American Games. They face a challenge not only because of their own lack of progress since being awarded the games three years ago.
SPORTS
July 8, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty days and 51 games ago, Argentina opened soccer's World Cup against Cameroon with a 1-0 loss that appeared at the time, before the Indomitable Lions proved themselves, to be the beginning of the end for the defending champions. The Argentines were written off in the media and told off by their president, Carlos Menem. Not even the country's No. 1 citizen, and the world's No. 1 player, Diego Armando Maradona, came to the team's defense.
SPORTS
July 9, 1990 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One month and 52 games after it began, soccer's World Cup was decided in a most anti-climactic fashion--on a controversial penalty kick six minutes from the end of the championship game at the Olympic Stadium. Although the referee's call that produced the game's only goal might not have been just, it was justice that prevailed when West Germany beat Argentina, 1-0, Sunday. West Germany, as it has been throughout the tournament, was the dominant team from start to finish of the 90-minute game.
SPORTS
June 3, 1994 | Associated Press
Diego Maradona, disgusted over suggestions that he dictates the team's roster, threatened Thursday to quit Argentina's World Cup team. The soccer star spoke in response to a radio interview with the mother of defender Dario Franco, who was left off the team. Franco's mother told radio station La Red her son was not placed on the team because Maradona "dictates the lineup to (Coach Alfio) Basile." Basile said Franco was excluded because of a leg injury.
SPORTS
July 4, 1994 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
We cry for you, Argentina. You played in a soccer game for the ages Sunday, played with what your coach called "fire and vigor" and still, despite the wondrousness of a Romanian team that just gets better and better, you kept trying. The truth is, you never left us. You were a team that came as one of the favorites to win World Cup '94, and you had to persevere through injury and the distraction of the loss of your superstar, Maradona, to yet another drug scandal.
SPORTS
July 1, 1994 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Diego Armando Maradona, the pudgy Argentine soccer star, was suspended from the World Cup on Thursday, the day he would have set a record for most games played in tournament history. In a sad ending to what had been a remarkable World Cup comeback, Maradona, 33, was withdrawn from the tournament by the Argentine Football Federation after testing positive for five types of banned substances under the umbrella name of ephedrine.
SPORTS
April 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Davis Cup competition between Argentina and Chile at Santiago, Chile, might be completed behind closed doors without fans. A singles match Friday between Argentina's Mariano Zabaleta and Chile's Nicolas Massu was suspended when angry fans pelted the court with plastic chairs, bottles and other items. Officials decided to complete the best-of-five American Zone match in private. That decision, however, could meet opposition from the players.
SPORTS
July 5, 1998 | MIKE PENNER
All the World Cup's a stage, and if Argentina is no longer in the running for the golden globe that is soccer's greatest prize, its captain has already laid claim to Best Actor, no vote required. The versatile Diego Simeone, accomplished defensive midfielder and thespian, nearly stole a spot in the World Cup semifinals for Argentina by hamming up two minor fouls into hysterical red-card rulings against second-round and quarterfinal opponents England and Holland.
SPORTS
December 25, 1997 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once there was a boy with a magic left foot. His name was Diego Armando Maradona. He was a poor boy from a poor neighborhood. At 10, he dazzled stadiums with juggling exhibitions during halftime at professional soccer games. He danced with the ball, making it float with his foot, his knee, his head, lost in impish rapture. When the referees tried to stop the boy and resume the games, the crowds booed. At 19, he led Argentina's national youth team to a world championship.
SPORTS
March 24, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Going to Argentina without checking out Diego Armando Maradona would be like going to Pisa without visiting the Leaning Tower. He might have a serious design flaw, but, Dios mio , is he one of a kind. One of the greatest soccer players of all time when he was not sulking or suspended, Maradona is in his eighth--and perhaps last--week as coach of Racing Club, a first-division team in Buenos Aires.
SPORTS
March 12, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a fading resort city attempting to reclaim its title as Argentina's favorite seaside retreat, many of the half-million residents began celebrating the XII Pan American Games days before Saturday night's opening ceremony at Estadio Ciudad de Mar del Plata. While bands playing Argentine tangos, Spanish torch songs and even Yanqui rock 'n roll turned the promenade alongside the Atlantic Ocean into their stage, hundreds of visitors to the beach sang and danced in the sand.
SPORTS
August 4, 1994 | JEFF WONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Racquetball is the kind of fast-paced, high-octane sport that sometimes seems a blur to its spectators. There are the 180-m.p.h. serves that crack against the walls like bullets fired from a gun. Then there are the players, crashing into walls and each other while flailing at the speeding ball. Lose concentration for a split-second and that point, and perhaps the match, is lost. Tony Jelso lost that focus not only for a second but for several months.
SPORTS
August 6, 1991 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the U.S. women's basketball team finished its players-only meeting Sunday night--it had been called to discuss the loss hours earlier to Brazil, which ended the United States' 42-game, nine-year winning streak--Coach Vivian Stringer of Iowa asked if anyone had anything to share with her. "They said no, that they wanted to demonstrate by their actions," Stringer said.
SPORTS
August 7, 1991 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
No doubt motivated by the chance that a victory Tuesday would earn them two days of R&R in Miami, the U.S. men's basketball team remained unbeaten in the Pan American Games with an 87-81 victory over a capable and equally motivated team from Argentina. U.S. Coach Gene Keady told his players that they might be able to spend their days off before the next game Friday night against the Bahamas in the relative luxury of a Miami hotel if they won their first three games here.
SPORTS
July 4, 1994 | BILL DWYRE, TIMES SPORTS EDITOR
We cry for you, Argentina. You played in a soccer game for the ages Sunday, played with what your coach called "fire and vigor" and still, despite the wondrousness of a Romanian team that just gets better and better, you kept trying. The truth is, you never left us. You were a team that came as one of the favorites to win World Cup '94, and you had to persevere through injury and the distraction of the loss of your superstar, Maradona, to yet another drug scandal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 1994 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the frenzied play in what some called the most exciting game yet of World Cup '94, much of the emotional energy was focused on two of soccer's fallen heroes Sunday, as Romania scored a 3-2 victory over Argentina at the Rose Bowl.
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