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Argentina Economy

BUSINESS
July 18, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Argentines, fearful that the government might abandon their currency's peg to the dollar, have pulled $2.6 billion out of the banking system, figures released Tuesday showed. The data raise concerns over a possible exodus of capital if the withdrawals are not halted. The statistics cover withdrawals during the five banking days ended Thursday. Because of delays in reporting, figures for Friday, which was considered another difficult day during the current crisis, were due to be released today.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move designed to reassure nervous investors, President Fernando de la Rua reached agreement Monday night with the main opposition governors to back a plan that would cut the budget. The agreement was announced hours after the stock market continued its plunge. The pact's details are to be announced today. "We have arrived at an agreement in fundamental concepts to arrive at zero deficit," Cabinet chief and lead negotiator Chrystian Colombo told reporters. Salta Gov.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2001 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Friday refused to help Argentina with its growing financial crisis. President Bush's national security advisor said Argentina should work to stabilize its economy, South America's second largest, and adhere to a course of fiscal responsibility that it had already set with the International Monetary Fund.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This week's Latin American market sell-off turned into a headlong rush to the exits Thursday as investors dumped stocks, bonds and currencies, fearful that Argentina lacked the political will and financial resources to avoid financial disaster. Fiel, a think tank affiliated with the government, estimated depositors pulled $1 billion in pesos from accounts on Thursday in anticipation that Argentina might devalue the currency, breaking the 1-to-1 peg to the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American currencies and bonds dropped Wednesday as contagion from Argentina's deepening financial crisis spread. Argentina's stocks were whipsawed, with the Merval exchange average plummeting 7.1% before ending the day down 2.2%. Shaken by a treasury auction Tuesday in which Argentina was forced to sell short-term notes at exorbitant rates to refinance its debt, investors bailed on bonds across the hemisphere.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stocks in Argentina slid to their lowest level since 1999 on Tuesday amid a new wave of doubts that the country can solve its economic ills. The plunge also drove down stocks and currencies in other Latin American countries. Argentina's main stock index, the Merval, fell 6.1% after the government was forced to pay investors more than 14% interest on 91-day treasury bills to help refinance $850 million in dollar-denominated debt.
BUSINESS
June 20, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Latin American stocks continued to fall Tuesday as officials pushed to defend a new policy on Argentine exchange rates that many feared could lead to a devaluation. After a decade of pegging its currency, the peso, to the U.S. dollar on a one-to-one basis, Argentina announced late Friday that it was setting up a separate exchange for trade transactions, making imports 7% more expensive.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stocks across Latin America and in Spain plunged Monday after Argentina stunned the financial community with a new policy on exchange rates that some analysts saw as a de facto devaluation. The policy changes, announced over the weekend, obliterated much of the confidence earned when Argentina exchanged $29 billion in debt this month, a move that seemed to give the country some breathing room from worried creditors.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2001 | From Reuters
Argentina surpassed expectations by swapping nearly $29.5 billion of old debt for new in its drive to stamp out investors' fears of a debt default, Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo said Sunday. Argentina's much-awaited exchange of short-term debt for longer-term issues will defer debt service costs by $16.04 billion through 2005, Cavallo said. The government hopes the swap will provide financial stability to help end the economy's nearly three-year funk.
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