Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsArgentina Economy
IN THE NEWS

Argentina Economy

NEWS
August 19, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Nineteen Latin American leaders rallied behind cash-strapped Argentina at a summit in Santiago, urging international lenders to come up with more emergency aid to ease the nation's debt crisis. Separately, Chilean President Ricardo Lagos, host of the two-day Rio Group gathering in the capital, also asked his partners to find a common front on hemispheric free trade and World Trade Organization talks.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
August 15, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
Argentine Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo on Tuesday urged citizens to return almost $10 billion they have pulled from domestic banks since the end of June, saying it would help the country avoid a currency devaluation and debt default. That money, he told a group of economists and students, remains in Argentina and could help make the financial system stable.
BUSINESS
August 13, 2001 | MARK EGAN, REUTERS
Argentine Finance Secretary Daniel Marx said Sunday that ongoing talks with the International Monetary Fund were productive, but cautioned it could take several weeks to secure a new loan. Marx and a delegation from Buenos Aires have spent the last three days locked in marathon meetings with IMF staffers.
BUSINESS
August 9, 2001 | Reuters
Argentina is negotiating with the International Monetary Fund on an aid package worth as much as $9 billion, a top Economy Ministry official said. "We're working [with the IMF] on a hypothesis that goes between $6 billion and $9 billion," Treasury Secretary Jorge Baldrich was quoted as saying by local wire services. A high-ranking official within the Economy Ministry confirmed that Baldrich had made the statement earlier.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2001 | SIMON GARDNER, REUTERS
Argentine Economy Minister Domingo Cavallo was confident Sunday that a visit by U.S. Treasury official John Taylor would help secure aid from the International Monetary Fund to boost confidence and stave off fears of a debt default. But in an interview with leading daily La Nacion Sunday, Cavallo was evasive about whether he had sought new cash on top of pre-agreed disbursements from multilateral lenders such as the IMF and what kind of IMF help he meant. "I am sure . . .
NEWS
August 5, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
John Taylor, international point man for the U.S. Treasury Department, concluded a visit to Argentina saying he was impressed with its measures to erase its budget deficit and spur growth. In a U.S. Embassy statement issued shortly before he was due to fly back to the United States, the Treasury undersecretary for international affairs said his meetings with top Argentine government officials had been "fruitful and detailed."
BUSINESS
August 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
The International Monetary Fund said Friday that it was prepared to accelerate a $1.2-billion loan to Argentina and establish a $15-billion line of emergency credit for Brazil in an effort to keep economic troubles in the two South American nations from spreading. IMF Managing Director Horst Koehler said he will recommend the actions.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2001 | Associated Press
The Bush administration signaled support for accelerating planned loans to Argentina, which is struggling to contain a financial crisis. The Treasury Department's top international official was heading to Argentina on an emergency fact-finding trip. Undersecretary John Taylor said before his departure for meetings in Buenos Aires that he believed there was a good chance the disbursement of new loans to Argentina by the International Monetary Fund would be approved soon.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2001 | LAURENCE NORMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Argentina's troubled economy suffered another glum day Wednesday, as stock and bond prices continued their downward slide despite the latest government attempt to relieve its debt financing burden for this year. The Merval stock index sank 4.3% to 307.80, bringing its year-to-date loss to 26%. Argentine bonds also got a pounding by foreign investors, sending yields soaring. The sell-offs occurred despite a steady stream of positive news emanating from Argentina's political world this week.
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Argentine government's key austerity bill was finally passed by Congress in a move seen as vital to quash fears of imminent default and help the economy out of crisis. After an all-night debate, the opposition-dominated Senate approved the unpopular bill to end deficit spending and slash state salaries and some pensions by as much as 13%, in an eagerly awaited predawn vote.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|